WMRA News

Jordy Yager

When most of us think of an artist in residence, we think of painters, potters, or maybe even poets. But what about an artist whose medium is sound? Well, that perked the ears of WMRA’s Jordy Yager, who has this report.

Marguerite Gallorini

Most of us learn about the global refugee crisis through news coverage rather than personal experience.  WMRA has been telling the stories of many refugees who have settled in Virginia. But what is the refugee experience in quieter parts of the world, far from the global media's attention? WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini takes us to her rural hometown in the east of France, called Saint-Loup.

Jordy Yager

Participants at the Black Male Town Hall Tuesday night, August 16, signed up to focus on key areas aimed at promoting change in Charlottesville’s African-American community. WMRA’s Jordy Yager reports.

Courtesy of Ashley Twiggs

Earning an MBA may give you the credentials you need to run a business, but does it really prepare you for the uncertainty you’ll face in that role?  Professors at UVa’s Darden School of Business thought they could do more to help students prepare for a life of executive decision making.  WMRA's Emily Richardson-Lorente has the story.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

According to the FBI, from 2000 until 2013 in the United States, 486 people were killed in 160 active shooter situations, defined as when a shooting is in progress and “law enforcement personnel and citizens have the potential to affect the outcome of the event based upon their responses.” Last week in Harrisonburg, various local law enforcement and emergency agencies practiced responding to such a situation. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz attended, and filed this report. A note of caution: While the scenario you are about to hear is staged, it also can be frightening.

Emily Richardson-Lorente

If you’ve driven through the UVa campus recently, you may have noticed a mural going up on the side of the Graduate Hotel. It’s a collaboration with the Charlottesville Mural Project, a Philadelphia artist and a prize-winning poet.  WMRA’s Emily Richardson-Lorente has the story.

Marguerite Gallorini

Chihamba's 27th African-American cultural arts festival just ended in Charlottesville last week. If you missed it, that's okay: WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini was there and has this report on the annual gathering that mixes social activism with good fun.

Jordy Yager

Tucked deep within Afton Mountain is a 19th century train tunnel engineered by Cladius Crozet that’s sat dormant for the last 70 years. WMRA’s Jordy Yager went inside both the tunnel and local efforts to bring it back to life.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

The global craze over the new augmented reality game Pokémon GO, which was released in the U.S. early this month, has also caught on in the Valley. On a recent hot afternoon, players were out and about in Harrisonburg, smartphones in hand, willingly sharing their personal information in exchange for fun. WMRA's Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

Over the years the push for biking and walking paths connecting neighborhoods and schools in Harrisonburg has grown; they’ve come to be expected in the city’s planning. But progress has a lot of moving parts including cost, engineering concerns, and reluctant landowners, as WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

Courtesy Woody McKenzie

So you missed the Red Wing Roots Music Festival. Or you went, but couldn’t get to see everyone you wanted to see. Well don’t worry, our special correspondent Kara Lofton was there and she introduces us to a couple of the artists to watch for in the coming year.

Courtesy Doah Fest 2015

We are well into music festival season this summer, but there’s one you may not have heard about. It’s Doah Fest, near Luray. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

Jordy Yager

Last month, a Charlottesville organization to mentor young men of color beat out more than one hundred other groups across the country to get the 100 Black Men of America’s chapter of the year award for mentoring.  WMRA’s Jordy Yager talked with some of the young men who have excelled in the program, and their mentors.

A special concert in Charlottesville is paying homage to late, great recording artist Prince, while also raising funds for a special cause. WMRA's Sefe Emokpae explains.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

Maybe you’ve seen one around--it wouldn’t be surprising. It’s the season in Virginia for nuisance bear activity, as WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

Virginia’s wind resources are largely untapped, but a two-day symposium next week at James Madison University aims to stimulate dialogue about and facilitate development of this energy source. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

Jessie Knadler

Nearly 30% of Virginia teenagers are either obese or overweight, and many of those calories come from sugary beverages. A statewide campaign is underway to encourage Virginia teens to forego the sodas and energy drinks for water. WMRA's Jessie Knadler heads to the high school in Buena Vista to find out if the campaign is effective and whether teens would ever consider ditching soda pop and energy drinks for a healthier alternative.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

For refugees trying to establish themselves in a strange land, just like for the rest of us, reliable transportation can be the key to landing a job, or simply being independent. One Harrisonburg bicycling enthusiast is not only teaching refugees how to ride bikes; she is also providing them with their own bicycles. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz attended the most recent class and has this report.

Jessie Knadler

Activists who helped bring an end to the Keystone XL pipeline from crossing Nebraska have come to Virginia to help local landowners do the same with Dominion’s Atlantic Coast pipeline. The alliance is staging six protests across Virginia and West Virginia, planting sacred corn along the route of the proposed pipeline. WMRA's Jessie Knadler attended one event in Stuarts Draft to learn more about these “seeds of resistance.”

Jessie Knadler

With the Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County slated to become a state park this year, local artist Mark Cline has been asked to move his plastic foam replica of England’s famous Stonehenge, dubbed Foamhenge, because it sits on property that will become part of the new park. Jessie Knadler talks to the artist about his quirky foam attraction, what it means to Rockbridge County and where he plans to move it.

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