WMRA News

On this weekend's Second Look, we compile our first three installments in our series on Refugees in Virginia, by Jessie Knadler and Jordy Yager.... and, Christopher Clymer Kurtz talked to the woman with the first confirmed case of imported Zika in Virginia.

Jessie Knadler

Last month, the Senate voted on legislation that would have enforced even stricter background checks on refugees from Syria and Iraq. The bill failed by only five votes, but it underscored an increasingly common narrative in some parts of the media – that asylum seekers from Middle Eastern countries potentially pose a threat. What doesn’t get as much attention are all the people in the Shenandoah Valley and beyond who want to help refugees if and when they arrive.  In the third installment of our series, WMRA’s Jessie Knadler explores what it means to be a volunteer.

Mary Plank

In our second installment on refugees in Virginia, WMRA’s Jordy Yager takes a look inside a new non-profit group in Charlottesville that pairs Americans with refugee families in an effort to strengthen community by doing something revolutionary… being a good neighbor.

Jessie Knadler

The world migration crisis has brought more attention to the plight of refugees.  But global terrorism and other concerns have fueled a national debate over whether America’s promise of welcoming those fleeing violence and persecution can be maintained. In the first of a month-long series on refugees, WMRA’s Jessie Knadler looks at who is being resettled in the Shenandoah Valley, who’s helping them, and whether local communities are welcoming them.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

In just a few weeks, Zika has gone from being a little known virus to a rather infamous one. The disease, new to the Western Hemisphere last year, is being closely watched internationally, and the World Health Organization has declared its spread a global public health emergency. Just last week, the Centers for Disease Control confirmed the first case of the Zika virus disease here in Virginia, in McGaheysville. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

We devote much of this week's Second Look to action in the General Assembly, where legislators debated concealed carry and cops in classrooms.  We also meet the Virginia Tech researcher who may be saving Flint, Michigan's water supply.... and we've got this week's episodes of The Spark and Our Island Universe, too!

  On this episode of Second Look, we focus on the Harrisonburg backyard fight club known on YouTube as "Streetbeefs," with a report from Christopher Clymer Kurtz, and an in-depth profile of the fight club's founder, Chris Wilmore with Martha Woodroof.... Also, a few of the "18 Stories of War" at EMU.... why Virginia's rules on bars may change.... and, Our Island Universe (hint: is there a bigger, badder new planet in our solar system?)

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

When you think of “war,” which war comes to your mind? How far removed are you from that war? How has war impacted your work? These are the questions asked of 18 people in a project currently on display at Eastern Mennonite University.  WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

On Thursday morning, Gov. Terry McAuliffe declared a state of emergency for Virginia, in anticipation of this weekend's expected winter storm.  Around 2 feet of snow may accumulate between Friday afternoon and Saturday night.

Courtesy Chris Wilmore

A new documentary called “Guns to Gloves” has been making the rounds on social media, and getting a lot of buzz in the Shenandoah Valley.  It was posted by the New York Times earlier this month.  In that video, we meet a man in Harrisonburg who is engaging in a unique, but perhaps time-honored – method of dispute resolution, staging fistfights in his backyard. And as WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports, the organizers of these fights have had to get used to LOTS of attention.

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