The Spark

Friday 6:20pm

The Spark is WMRA's own creative look at --well-- creativity. We dig into whatever people are passionate about in the WMRA region: sculpture, model railroading, costume-making, poetry, whatever.

Please note that while we no longer produce The Spark as a full-length program (due to Martha Woodroof's retirement), her interviews continue to appear within our Friday broadcast of All Things Considered.

We want to hear from those who are doing artsy or interesting or wonderful or obsessive things.  We also recognize that lots of creatives are a tad shy and might not ever speak up for themselves. 

You can put something on our radar about yourself or can tell us about someone you know of who might be interesting by sending an e-mail to the show host, Martha Woodroof:
WoodroMH@jmu.edu
(To launch an email to Martha automatically click here. )

Scroll down to hear past segments.

Consider this a community-wide celebration of the many people among us who invest time, energy and discipline into pushing against life's boundaries.

Listen to a typical 2012 version of the show's end credits (including Martha asking to hear from those who know about creative goings-on) : here (60 seconds).

2013 Spark intern Julia Skinner has been tasked with blogging about potentially Spark-worthy peers, and you can find the link to that blog on this page.

On this episode of The Spark: Anastasia Suslaev came to America at the age of 10, knowing two words of English. Since then she'd gotten her undergraduate degree from Eastern Mennonite, her Masters from JMU, and she's just about to become a certified nurse midwife.

A Poet Emerges

May 13, 2016

On this episode of The Spark: Part two of our conversation with Scott Price. Scott had never wanted anything but a career in the Army. Then a back injury took his career, his marriage failed, and he lost his identity… but thanks to poetry, he’s now starting to rebuild his life.  

On this episode of The Spark: Scott Price discusses his time in the Army. Scott, as a VMI graduate and Army Captain, wanted nothing more than to be a good soldier.

On this episode of The Spark: Martha speaks with climate journalist and research scholar Stephen Nash. He discusses his passion for telling the stories that illustrate climate change in our state and the challenges of covering those stories. 

Finding Your Voice

Apr 8, 2016

On this episode of The Spark: Dick Orange has always loved to sing. So when he moved to the Charlottesville area after a long career as a teacher and school administrator, Dick decided to make singing his second, full-time career.

On this episode of The Spark: Author Preston Lauterbach says he likes history that has a soundtrack – hence his first two books: The Chitlin’ Circuit and the Road to Rock ’n’ Roll, and Beale Street Dynasty: Sex, Song and the Struggle for the soul of Memphis. 

On this episode of The Spark: Harrisonburg's Claudia McClain picked up her knitting years ago when she put down alcohol. And not being able to find the right yarns, she decided to design and manufacture her own. Voila! Claudia's Hand painted Yarn. When she's knitting, Claudia says that four words repeat like a mantra in her mind as she knits:  peace, love, comfort, joy.

Born to Read

Mar 11, 2016

On this episode of The Spark: Last fall, high school junior Eleanor Alger took time out from her honors classes, busy extra-curricular life, and college tours to read some 500 children's books. Eleanor is an unofficial part of the selection process for this year's Newberry medal and honors.

Goodnight Songs

Mar 4, 2016

On this episode of The Spark: Batesville's Emily Gary and her musical partner, Tom Proutt,  recently collaborated to set a hidden trove of the late Margaret Wise Brown's previously unpublished poems to music. Margaret Wise Brown is the author of the fabled children's classic, Goodnight Moon.

On this episode of The Spark: Rusty Noesner retired two years ago after six years in the Navy. He spent five of those years as a Navy Seal, including a year of combat duty in Afghanistan. These days he lives in Harrisonburg, where he is working on slowing his head down and figuring out what he wants to do next with his life.

Pages