Morning Edition

Monday - Friday, 5am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne
Bob Leweke

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. National hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep, and local host Bob Leweke, bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite you to experience the stories.

On any given day, topics may include reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and discover the untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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NPR Story
4:19 am
Thu April 26, 2012

U.S. Considers Ways To Keep Drones In Pakistan

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 9:21 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's follow up on the controversy over the American use of drones in Pakistan. Over the past few years, no issue has done quite as much to inflame public sentiment and stir anti-American feelings in Pakistan as drone strikes.

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NPR Story
4:19 am
Thu April 26, 2012

After Backlash, Ethanol Industry Is Thriving

Young corn plants grow next to the Guardian Energy ethanol plant in Janesville, Minn. Five years ago, the U.S. government projected that in 2012, ethanol production would use up 30 percent of the nation's corn supply. Last year, it used 40 percent.
Glen Stubbe MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 1:28 pm

Five years ago, ethanol was seen as the next big thing to wean the U.S. off foreign oil. Then some studies on the corn-based fuel cast doubt on its environmental benefits, and auto companies turned their attention to hybrids and electric cars. The hype died off, but the ethanol industry is alive and well, driving a big change in America's corn consumption.

Rising up out of the corn fields outside Lake Odessa, Mich., is the ethanol refinery for Carbon Green Bioenergy. The company's CEO, Mitch Miller, says a lot of refineries were popping up when this one was built in 2006.

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Around the Nation
8:14 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Settlement Clears Path For Cross On Sunrise Rock

Back in 1934, veterans of World War I put up a memorial in the Mojave Desert, setting a cross on what's known as Sunrise Rock. Private citizens have always maintained the cross even though it was on federal land. But the memorial has sparked debate for years. According to the Los Angeles Times, the Park Service will give the property to Henry and Wanda Sandoz in exchange for land they own elsewhere.

Around the Nation
7:15 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Va. Woman Wins Powerball Twice In Same Day

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 8:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. We know the odds of winning a million dollar Powerball jackpot - one in five million. But what are the odds of winning that jackpot twice in one day? That's just what Virginia Fike said to herself when she accidentally bought to Powerball tickets instead of one. Whatever they are, she beat the odds. Her five lucky numbers brought her a double win. And last Friday she was handed a check for $2 million. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:02 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Heisman Winner RG3 Immortalized In Chicken

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 8:10 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Education
6:07 am
Wed April 25, 2012

On Campuses, Obama Pitches Low-Cost College Loans

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 8:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

A new poll suggests President Obama has an excellent chance of winning the youth vote. He leads voters under 30 by a wide margin.

MONTAGNE: But that's not exactly the question in a hard-fought campaign. The president does not lead among young voters by the same margin as in 2008.

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Business
4:49 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Activists Disrupt Wells Fargo Shareholders Meeting

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 6:33 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And there were protests and arrests at the Wells Fargo annual shareholders meeting in San Francisco yesterday. The demonstration - led by the Occupy Movement - was over the bank's foreclosure and lending policies. Hundreds of protesters bought bank shares so they could attend the meeting and disrupt proceedings. [POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: While hundreds sought to disrupt the meeting, several dozen people representing community groups had purchased stock.]

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Business
4:49 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Are Bribes The Norm In Mexico's Business Culture?

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 8:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Wal-Mart's stock price has fallen sharply this week. That comes after The New York Times reported that the retailer's rapid growth in Mexico involved systematic bribery. Stock prices have also fallen for Wal-Mart's Mexico subsidiary Walmex.

This negative reaction came, even though financial journalist Eduardo Garcia in Mexico City, says bribery is a normal part of business in Mexico.

Was anybody in the business community in Mexico surprised to hear these allegations against Wal-Mart?

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Business
4:49 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Fitch Upgrades Ford's Junk Status

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 8:10 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

After all the reports about massive debts and credit downgrades, we have a story this morning of a credit upgrade. The ratings agency Fitch upgraded Ford.

INSKEEP: The company was at junk bond status, meaning a loan to Ford was considered a major gamble. Now, it's been moved to investment grade, the lowest investment rating: BBB minus.

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Business
4:49 am
Wed April 25, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 8:10 am

The town of Boring, Oregon, is twinning with the village of Dull, Scotland. The idea came after a Scottish cyclist passed through Boring. She thought Dull would make a great sister community. Scotland's tourism agency says the partnership could attract visitors to Dull.

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