Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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NPR Story
4:01 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Verdict In Trial Of Bo Xilai Due This Weekend

In this Aug. 22, 2013 file photo released by the Jinan Intermediate People's Court, former Politburo member and Chongqing city party leader Bo Xilai, center, stands on trial at the court in eastern China's Shandong province. A verdict is expected on Sept. 22. (Jinan Intermediate People's Court via AP)

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 4:21 pm

China’s biggest political scandal in decades reaches a conclusion this weekend.

A verdict is due in the trial of Bo Xilai, one of China’s rising political stars. He’s accused of corruption and covering up the murder of the British businessman Neil Heywood.

Bo’s wife has already been found guilty of poisoning Heywood, with whom she had a business dispute. Bo remains a popular figure.

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NPR Story
4:01 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

13 Injured In Chicago Park Shooting

Chicago Police detectives investigate the scene where a number of people, including a 3-year-old child, were shot in a city park on the south side of Chicago, Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. (Paul Beaty/AP)

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 4:21 pm

Thirteen people were wounded in a shooting in Chicago late Thursday night, including a 3-year-old boy.

The shooting took place in the Back of the Yards neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago.

Police are still interviewing victims to determine a motive for the shooting, but a police spokesman said it appeared to be gang-related.

Chicago had more than 500 homicides in 2012, more than any other city in the United States.

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NPR Story
4:30 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Play Illuminates Rocky Year In Johnson Presidency

Bryan Cranston is pictured in "All the Way." (Evgenia Eliseeva/American Repertory Theater)

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 4:33 pm

Bill Rauch graduated from Harvard University in 1984 and co-founded the Cornerstone Theater Company, which made a point of bringing theater to underserved places.

He’s since moved on to become artistic director of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Now, he returns to Cambridge, Mass. to direct “All the Way” at the American Repertory Theater.

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NPR Story
4:30 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Revisiting The Fire That Killed 19 Hotshots

Unidentified members of the Granite Mountain Interagency Hotshot Crew from Prescott, Ariz., pose together in this undated photo provided by the City of Prescott. Some of the men in this photograph were among the 19 firefighters killed while battling an out-of-control wildfire near Yarnell, Ariz., on Sunday, June 30, 2013, according to Prescott Fire Chief Dan Fraijo. It was the nation's biggest loss of firefighters in a wildfire in 80 years. (City of Prescott, Ariz.)

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 4:33 pm

The Yarnell Hill fire that swept through Arizona in late June and early July burned more than 8,000 acres, destroyed 129 buildings and killed 19 firefighters — members of the Granite Mountain Hotshot crew from nearby Prescott, Ariz.

An independent investigative team has been looking at whether or not human error contributed to the deaths of almost the entire team. Their findings are expected out in the next few weeks.

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NPR Story
4:30 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

SEC Wants Companies To Disclose CEO-Worker Pay Ratio

The Securities and Exchange Commission's Washington DC headquarters. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 1:27 pm

The Securities and Exchange Commission has proposed a rule that would require publicly traded companies to disclose the difference in pay between the company’s CEO and its employees.

The rule is applauded by unions and labor advocacy groups that think the transparency would help investors “identify top heavy compensation models,” according to Reuters. However, business groups oppose the measure.

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NPR Story
4:36 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

From Arsenio To Queen Latifah, Familiar Faces In New Talk Shows

Queen Latifah speaks with Will Smith on a recent episode of her new talk show, "The Queen Latifah Show." (The Queen Latifah Show)

There are some familiar faces coming to the syndicated talk show line-up this fall.

Already, Arsenio Hall has made his return to late night after a 19-year hiatus. On Monday, Queen Latifah made her return to daytime with “The Queen Latifah Show.” Reality star Bethenny Frankel is also hosting her own talk show this fall.

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NPR Story
4:36 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

N.C. Officer Charged In Death Of Unarmed Black Man

Willie Ferrell, left, talks about his relationship with his older brother, Jonathan Ferrell, at a media conference, as attorney Christopher Chestnut, center, his mother, Georgia Ferrell, right, listen on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, in Charlotte, N.C. Police were called Sept. 14, after the former Florida A&M University football player knocked on the door of a home near the car crash he was in. Ferrell was hit with a Taser as he approached officers and then shot, resulting in a voluntary manslaughter charge against one of the officers. (Bob Leverone/AP)

A North Carolina police officer has been charged with voluntary manslaughter in the shooting death of an unarmed black man.

Officer Randall Kerrick of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department fired 12 shots, ten of which hit 24-year-old Jonathan Ferrell, according to authorities.

Ferrell, who had played football for Florida A&M University, was seeking help after crashing his car, according to authorities.

When he knocked on a woman’s door, she called 911 — alarmed to find Ferrell on her doorstep.

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NPR Story
4:36 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

How Mercury Poisons Gold Miners, Water In Indonesia

A gold miner in Indonesia holds up a bottle of mercury. (BBC)

Next month, 140 nations will sign the United Nations’ Minamata Convention.

It’s a treaty that aims to regulate the use of mercury worldwide, and is named after the Japanese community that witnessed the world’s biggest mass mercury poisoning 60 years ago.

Today, contamination with mercury is a particular problem in countries where small-scale gold miners operate. Mercury is used to separate fragments of gold from the rock or earth.

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NPR Story
5:33 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

First Nations DJs Mix Tradition With Electronic Beats

Members of the First Nations trio of deejays, A Tribe Called Red. (A Tribe Called Red)

A Tribe Called Red is an Ottawa-based trio of First Nations DJs who remix social powwow music with electronic dance beats.

The group’s music has put them at the forefront of a First Nations political and cultural renaissance.

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NPR Story
5:33 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Flood Cleanup Begins In Colorado

Downtown Estes Park, Colo., is pictured on the morning of Friday, Sept. 13, 2013. (Town of Estes Park Facebook page)

The rain has stopped and the flood waters are beginning to recede in Colorado.

Many communities are now trying to figure out how to move forward, the how to begin cleaning up and returning home.

Kate Rauch is spokeswoman for the city of Estes Park, Colo., one of the hardest-hit areas.

She told Here & Now that the cleanup process has already begun.

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