Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

Locals put the crisis into a perspective that’s easy to understand.

Louisiana loses a football field of land every hour of the day.

“Even my customers are starting to recognize it now,” says charter boat captain Ripp Blank. “And it don’t come back once it leaves.”

Blank has been fishing the waters around Bayou Barataria — 30 miles or so north of the Gulf of Mexico — his entire life. If you’re a newcomer, it can be hard to discern where the water ends and the land begins.

There are reports that President Trump has decided to withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change. Wednesday morning, he tweeted that he will make a formal announcement this week.

A new oral history project at California’s Fresno State is documenting the roots of the hip-hop dance craze known as popping.

Alice Daniel from Here & Now contributor KQED has our story.

In the mid-1800s over half a million Americans migrated west in covered wagons along the Oregon Trail. They were searching for riches, claiming land and fleeing religious persecution.

But no one had authentically crossed the trail in a wagon in over a century — until Rinker Buck. Jakob Lewis of Here & Now contributor WPLN shares Buck’s story of facing the uncertainty of adventure, and the fleeting nature of arriving.

Demetri Martin is known for his stand-up comedy routines, his years as a correspondent on “The Daily Show” and his quirky drawings that have been featured in two books.

But in his new film “Dean” — which Martin directed, wrote and stars in — he takes a more serious turn, playing a young man struggling in the aftermath of his mother’s death.

Frank Deford, the longtime sportswriter for Sports Illustrated, died Sunday at his home in Key West, Florida. He was 78. Deford was known to millions for weekly commentaries he delivered on NPR’s Morning Edition for 37 years. His last commentary for NPR was on May 3.

In “Mischling,” author Affinity Konar tells the story of twins Pearl and Stasha, who are sent to Auschwitz in 1944 and are experimented on by Dr. Josef Mengele, known as the “Angel of Death.” Konar drew inspiration from the stories of real-life Auschwitz survivors.

“Mischling” was named one of the New York Times Book Review’s 100 Notable Books of 2016, and comes out in paperback on Tuesday.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young revisits a conversation with Konar from September.

Coptic Christians Targeted Again In Egypt

May 26, 2017

More than 20 people were killed Friday when gunmen opened fire on a bus carrying Coptic Christians to a monastery in Egypt. There have been a number of recent attacks claimed by ISIS on Coptic Christians in the country.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson gets the latest from NPR’s Jane Arraf (@janearraf) in Cairo.

In the 1980s, a Florida native named Edward Stierle created a ballet that was a response to the AIDS crisis. It also stands as its creator’s own requiem.

The company Dance Now Miami is performing “Lacrymosa” next week in Miami Beach. Alicia Zuckerman (@AliciaZuckerman) from Here & Now contributor WLRN has our story.

Danielle Belton (@blacksnob) of The Root speaks with Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about stories trending online — from a photo of President Trump with Pope Francis, to a story about an African-American pageant winner who was arrested and spent a night in a

Imagine life without credit cards. If you couldn’t borrow money to finance a big purchase, how would you do it?

There’s growing evidence many people in the developing world are turning to gambling. Sonia Paul (@sonipaul) with 60db reports from Kampala, Uganda.

In Manchester, England, police have arrested eight people in connection with Monday night’s bombing at Manchester Arena. The investigation has also extended to Libya.

The bomber, Salman Abedi, spent three weeks there, and returned just days before the attack. Abedi’s father and brother have also been detained by Libyan authorities.

Leon Panetta, who served as director of the CIA and defense secretary under former President Obama, joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the Manchester bombing and national security issues during President Trump’s time in office.

Panetta is currently chairman of the Panetta Institute for Public Policy.

Air pollution may be disrupting your sleep, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Washington. Air pollution can cause a number of acute and chronic health problems, and even though some cities are making efforts improve air quality, it’s getting worse in many places around the world.

Moody’s Investors Services cut China’s credit rating for the first time since 1989 this week, changing its outlook from stable to negative.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake (@maggielake) about what’s behind the decision.

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