Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

How HQ Trivia Became So Popular

Jan 25, 2018

HQ is a hugely popular trivia game app that connects people around the world at preset times each day for live games.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson learns more about the app from Ben Johnson (@TheBrockJohnson), senior producer of Endless Thread and a tech correspondent for Here & Now.

The former sports doctor who admitted to molesting some of the nation’s top gymnasts for years was sentenced Wednesday to 40 to 175 years in prison as the judge declared: “I just signed your death warrant.”

The sentence capped a remarkable seven-day hearing in which scores of Larry Nassar’s victims were able to confront him face to face in a Michigan courtroom.

One year after the Women’s March, the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements have helped create momentum among women from diverse communities — fighting issues including sexual harassment, but also pushing for equal pay, worker’s rights and legal protections.

Parents are grappling with how to prevent their children from becoming too tied to technology. And others are worried about it as well. Earlier this month, two major Apple investors called on the company to help curb heavy smartphone use. But there are other ways of implementing parental controls.

The Oscar nominations were announced Tuesday. Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” leads the way with 13 nominations, while “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and “Dunkirk” follow closely behind with eight and seven nominations, respectively.

Editor’s Note: This segment discusses sexual abuse, and contains audio that some listeners may find disturbing or offensive.

There could be a sentence as soon as Wednesday for Larry Nassar, the former USA Gymnastics team doctor who has admitted to using his position to sexually abuse underage girls. More than 120 women have given victim impact statements in court.

With the Winter Olympics only weeks away, excitement is mounting for participating athletes. But that joy has been marred by recent tragedies. French skier and Olympic hopeful David Poisson was killed at the Nakiska ski area in Alberta, Canada, in mid-November after crashing through a safety barrier and hitting a tree. Weeks later, German skier Max Burkhart was also killed in Alberta, competing at the Nor-Am Cup.

The accidents, and others, leave some asking whether the risks of some winter sports are at best unreasonable and at worst immoral.

Clock Is Ticking Toward Government Shutdown

Jan 18, 2018

The federal government will partially shutdown Friday night unless Congress approves a spending plan. Democrats also want to get a resolution to the DACA program that covers people brought illegally to the U.S. as children.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young get the latest on the negotiations with NPR’s Jessica Taylor (@JessicaTaylor).

You may have seen an illustration on Martin Luther King Jr. Day showing the civil rights leader with a hand over President Trump’s mouth, trying to get the president to stop tweeting. The artist is Watson Mere, he was born in the U.S., but his parents are Haitian.

Mere (@ArtOfMere_) speaks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about his image, and the president’s recent alleged comments asking, “Why do we want people from Haiti here?”

The NFL playoffs are down to the final four teams, and the matchup for Super Bowl LII will be set after Sunday’s conference title games.

Legal sales of recreational marijuana have begun in California. But there’s no standard for how much marijuana you can have in your system and still get behind the wheel. So is it possible to test if someone is too high to drive?

Eli Wirtschafter (@RadioEli) from KALW reports an emerging industry is trying to answer that question.

U.S. counterintelligence officials warned Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, that Wendi Deng Murdoch might be promoting the interests of the Chinese government, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Collette and Scott Stohler gave up their respective careers in engineering and ad production to become “travel influencers” — charging tourism boards, hotels, adventure companies and others a fee to post pictures and videos (mostly of themselves) in the exotic location of the company’s choice, on their own social media, under the name Roamaroo.

The Dow Jones set a new record Tuesday, hitting the 26,000 mark. But there’s also some less-encouraging economic news out there: the U.S. dollar is weakening compared to global currencies.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with MSNBC’s Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi).

We usually think of vaccines as preventing illness. But some cancer researchers hope to create a vaccine that will “treat” the disease, and they’ve made progress recently on a whole new mode of fighting cancer called a “personal cancer vaccine” — a treatment that would be custom-made for a single patient.

In remarks at his golf club in Florida on Sunday night, President Trump said Democrats don’t want to reach a deal on immigration, and he told reporters he’s “the least racist person you have ever interviewed.” Trump made those remarks days after he reportedly spoke in crude terms in a White House meeting about immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and African countries.

You may not have heard of them, but electronic sports, or e-sports, are a fast-growing industry in the U.S. Tournaments are now selling out arenas just like football and basketball games do.

The Congressional Hispanic Caucus said in a statement Friday that President Trump’s comments about Haiti, El Salvador and several African countries are “shameful, abhorrent, unpresidential” and deserve “our strongest condemnation.”

When Johnny Cash Met Glen Sherley

Jan 11, 2018

Johnny Cash first performed the song “Greystone Chapel” as part of his legendary recording session at Folsom State Prison near Sacramento, 50 years ago this Saturday. It was also the day Cash met the the song’s author, inmate Glen Sherley.

As Chloe Veltman (@chloeveltman) from KQED reports, the fateful encounter was to change both men’s lives — for better and for worse.

Environmental groups are applauding New York City’s decision to sue five major oil companies and divest its pension funds of $5 billion in fossil fuel investments.

Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio made the announcement Thursday that the city is suing BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil and Royal Dutch Shell.

A new Republican bill being introduced Wednesday would allow young undocumented immigrants who receive protection from deportation under the expiring Deferred Action for Child Arrivals (DACA) program to receive three-year renewable legal status. It also would dramatically boost border security and immigration enforcement.

In a nearly hourlong live shot from inside the White House on Tuesday afternoon, President Trump and a bipartisan group of lawmakers from the House and Senate deliberated on whether there should be a deal on deportation protection for young immigrants living in the U.S. under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA.

President Trump signed two executive orders Monday aimed at addressing broadband access for rural Americans. While the orders are supposed to reduce regulations for internet providers, critics say the real problem is a lack of government investment.

The U.S. is in the midst of a “moderately severe” flu season, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. Dave Feldman, chairman and medical director at the emergency department at Good Samaritan Hospital in San Jose, California, joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss what his hospital and others in the area are seeing.

Interview Highlights

On whether California’s flu season has been worse than “moderately severe”

Viking Lumber cuts large trees like old-growth Sitka spruce and yellow cedar. It buys most of the trees from the federal government’s timber sales in the Tongass National Forest. But those sales could become a thing of the past, unless Congress steps in.

A new law in Oregon allows people in counties with a population of less than 40,000 to pump their own gas. Trouble is, that’s been banned in the state for so long that some Oregonians don’t know how to do it themselves. The reaction by some people in the state has led to Oregonians being mocked on social media.

Journalist Michael Wolff’s new book, “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” was released Friday.

Publisher Henry Holt & Co. decided to push the publication date up by four days after President Trump’s legal team issued a cease-and-desist letter to Wolff, the publisher and former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, who was interviewed at length for the book.

The U.S. economy added 148,000 jobs in the last month of 2017, closing out a strong year of job growth. The unemployment rate held steady at 4.1 percent in December.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with CBS News’ Jill Schlesinger (@jillonmoney), host of “Jill on Money” and the podcast “Better Off.”

President Trump has been tweeting encouragement to protesters in Iran, bringing a sharp rebuke from the Iranian government. But former Obama administration official Dennis Ross says Trump is right to change U.S. policy toward Iran.