Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests the last woolly mammoths died out because they didn’t have enough water to drink. That happened about 6,000 years ago, on St. Paul Island off the coast of Alaska.

Russell Graham, a professor in Penn State’s Department of Geosciences, joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the new finding.

Frank Shorter won the Olympic Marathon in Munich in 1972, and four years later added a silver medal to that gold when he finished second in the marathon at the games in Montreal.

He later helped establish the first anti-doping agency in the U.S. and served as a spokesman against athletes using performance enhancing drugs. But his public persona hid a dark secret: the years of abuse he and his siblings suffered at the hands of their father, Dr. Samuel Shorter.

Two weeks of party conventions and back-to-back speeches meant to revel in political ideals also highlighted something else: language.

Derek Thompson of The Atlantic writes that unlike past political cycles, current Republicans and Democrats speak with different sets of vocabulary, even as they discuss the same policy issues.

Shawn Johnson was the sprightly 16-year-old gymnast who charmed the country at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, winning a gold on the balance beam, and silver medals for the team, all-around and floor exercise competitions.

For a teenager from Des Moines, Iowa, it sounds like a dream true. But those first years at home after the Games weren’t easy. Johnson struggled with the constant spotlight, and, for a time, with an eating disorder.

The Divine Lorraine Hotel is one of Philadelphia’s most prominent examples of blight.

The late Victorian complex was built in 1894 as a stylish set of apartments. When it changed hands 54 years later, it became the first racially integrated hotel in the city and a symbol of pride and luxury.

The four-day Democratic National Convention put Philadelphia in the spotlight. The world learned of its historic roots, the Liberty Bell, and the city’s food. But what visitors may not have seen are the neighborhoods that make Philadelphia the largest city with the most deep poverty in the country.

Aaron Moselle of Here & Now contributor WHYY explains how it happened.

Pope Francis’s visit to Poland this week celebrates the country’s rich Catholic heritage, but it also highlights tensions with the Polish Catholic culture and the current right-wing government’s anti-immigrant stance.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with historian Piotr H. Kosicki, a University of Maryland professor and a former scholar at the Wilson Center, about Poland’s evolving relationship with Europe and the world.

Farmers are watching the election closely, looking at issues like immigration which could affect farm labor. Today, a look at the dangers of farming.

According to the International Labor Organization, nearly half of the 335,000 workplace fatalities around the world every year take place in agriculture settings.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with David Griffiths and his wife Edie, founders of Seven Stars Farm Organic Yogurt, about the hay bale accident that left him quadriplegic.

Prosecutors dropped the remaining charges against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray. The move comes after three other officers were not convicted.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Jennifer Ludden, NPR national correspondent, about the case.

Guest

Jennifer Ludden, NPR national correspondent. She tweets @jenniferludden.

There was one shooting every six hours on average last year in Philadelphia. In the past 10 years, more than 14,500 shootings occurred, with at least 2,600 killed by guns — many of whom were black residents.

While some see the numbers as a reason to increase gun control, others see things differently.

Yuri Zalzman of North Philadelphia’s The Gun Range and Maj Toure of the activist group Black Guns Matter have come together to try to find solutions.

Donald Trump ended his speech at the Republican National Convention last night with the phrase that has become the central one of his campaign: “Make America great again.”

When people use that phrase, what era are they referring to? Here & Now producer Chris Ballman asked Republican delegates that question outside the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland.

When you hear “make America great again,” what era comes to mind? Let us know with a comment below.

It’s been a big week for Cleveland with the Republican National Convention, but the city is used to royalty — rock royalty. The phrase “rock ‘n’ roll” is said to have originated here, from local DJ Alan Freed.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young went to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and spoke with visitors and Meredith Rutledge-Borger, the museum’s associate curator, about Cleveland’s music history.

A manhunt was underway Friday for a shooter or shooters who opened fire at a shopping mall in Munich, killing and wounding several people, a Munich police spokeswoman said.

Munich police spokeswoman Claudia Kuenzel told The Associated Press there had been “several dead and wounded” in the shooting at Olympia Einkaufszentrum mall. She could not provide exact numbers.

“The shooter or shooters are still on the run” either in or around the mall, she said.

The Bavarian Interior Ministry confirmed at least one dead and multiple people hurt.

The 2016 Republican National Convention has come to a close, finishing up with a much-anticipated speech from GOP nominee Donald Trump.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Democratic political analyst Jamal Simmons and Republican strategist Paris Dennard about the reactions on both sides of the aisle.

Hear more of Here & Now‘s coverage from the Republican National Convention.

The toilets, sewage systems and waste that a civilization leaves behind can tell researchers a lot about how that civilization lived.

Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow, who teaches at Brandies University, has studied the toilets and sewage systems of ancient Rome. She speaks with Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about her research.

Interview Highlights: Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow

On the changing understanding of Roman toilets

Silicon Valley’s high tech giants and starts ups have drawn hundreds of thousands of South Asians to the San Francisco Bay Area in recent years. The influx has led to an explosion of Indian arts, especially music and dance.

Rachael Myrow of Here & Now contributing station KQED explores the growing scene.

Read more on this story via KQED.

Clevelanders used to cringe every time someone mentioned that the polluted Cuyahoga River caught fire in June 1969. But a new generation is embracing the “Burning River” name.

Elizabeth Miller from Here & Now contributor WCPN in Cleveland reports.

Read more on this story via WCPN Ideastream.

Two of the biggest beer companies in the world are getting closer to merging. Belgian-based Anheuser-Busch InBev received clearance from the United States Justice Department to take over London-based SABMiller, as long as it meets some specific conditions.

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Curt Nickisch of the Harvard Business Review about the merger.

Read more on this story via the Harvard Business Review.

The Republican National Convention has received plenty of media coverage, but what has the experience been like for convention delegates?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young met with delegates from New Jersey, Tennessee and California to get their views on how this unpredictable convention has gone.

Hear more of Here & Now‘s coverage from the Republican National Convention.

Follow the Here & Now election road trip on Tumblr.

There’s been a lot of controversy about parts of Melania Trump’s speech that mirrored Michelle Obama’s address to the Democratic Convention eight years ago. But how much did that matter to the delegates at the convention?

Here & Now host Robin Young talks with Fulton County, Georgia County Commissioner and GOP delegate Liz Haussman about Trump’s keynote address and what’s resonating with the delegates.

Interview Highlights: Liz Haussman

On claims of plagiarism in Melania’s speech:

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