Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

A summer hike up to a 13,000-foot alpine meadow can be exhilarating. However the lack of oxygen, frigid temperatures and sparse vegetation would make long-term survival difficult. Archaeologists know hunter-gatherers traversed highland areas thousands of years ago, but presumed they had to spend most of their time in lowland areas.

The new Girl Scouts CEO Sylvia Acevedo comes to the organization from a background in technology, and she’s introducing new achievement badges and other incentives to encourage girls to discover and pursue careers in science and technology.

In a View From The Top conversation, Acevedo (@SylviaAcevedo) talks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about her efforts.

California has the largest number of homeless people living without shelter in the country. More than two-thirds of the state’s 118,000 homeless live on the streets or in tent encampments, many in the state’s largest cities. This is certainly true in Oakland, a city that prides itself on its progressive values.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions says he plans to stay on as the nation’s top prosecutor, despite criticism from President Trump in an interview last week. As attorney general, Sessions has been pursuing a conservative agenda and rolling back Obama-era policies.

President Trump says he wants to let the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, fail. He’s repeated the threat over and over in news conferences and on Twitter.

But NPR’s Alison Kodjak (@alikodjakNPR) reports that the health care law isn’t collapsing on its own: The president and his team are actively undermining the Affordable Care Act markets.

Iraq has declared military victory over ISIS in Mosul, but the painstaking process of rooting out the group’s influence in the devastated city continues.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins talks with France 24 journalist Simona Foltyn (@simonafoltyn), who went door to door in Mosul with counterterrorism officials searching for ISIS supporters.

There was a time when Google Glass was deemed the future — one in which people might walk the streets wearing a glass tab over one eye to display information beamed from their smartphones. But after criticism and safety concerns, the idea was killed as a consumer project.

O.J. Simpson Up For Parole

Jul 20, 2017

A parole hearing is slated for this afternoon in Nevada for O.J. Simpson. Simpson, the former football star who was acquitted in 1995 of murdering his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman, is currently serving a nine- to 33-year sentence for armed robbery and kidnapping. He was convicted in 2008.

British journalist and scientist Zeeya Merali isn’t content writing about easy subjects. Merali is a theoretical cosmologist, and her latest book tackles the possibility that scientists are getting closer to the day when they may be able to create a tiny universe in the laboratory. She does a deep dive into the implications — about creation, faith and morality.

As our summer lake series continues, we look at families who return to the same treasured lake again and again, summer after summer.

The Ewings from Spokane, Washington, are one such family. They’ve enjoyed rustic cabins on the shores of nearby Newman Lake for over 80 years.

After the latest Senate plan’s failure to move forward, where does the GOP health care overhaul effort stand?

NPR’s Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoNPR) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy’s Hobson to discuss the latest, as well as House Republican leaders releasing a 10-year budget plan that calls for dramatic military spending increases and drastic cuts in social spending.

The bipartisan vote to extend California’s climate change law through 2030 was a major victory for Gov. Jerry Brown. The state’s cap-and-trade program puts a statewide cap on greenhouse gas emissions and allows businesses to buy credits, essentially allowing them to release pollutants.

Guy Marzorati (@GuyMarzorati) of Here & Now contributor KQED tells Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson how it works.

When the Trump administration threatened to take away federal money from “sanctuary cities” earlier this year, many of those jurisdictions doubled down, saying they had no intention of becoming an arm of the federal government by turning people over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has emerged as a fierce critic of President Trump. He’s blasted the president over immigration, health care and climate change. In doing so, Inslee has developed something of a national profile, and soon he’ll likely attract even more attention.

Although Islam is the fastest-growing religion in the world, not all people born Muslim remain Muslim. But for many, it’s not easy to leave a religion that is a major part of their lives and communities.

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