Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

The pharmaceutical industry has long used targeted ads on television and in magazines to encourage certain populations to use their medicines. Now drug companies, with the help of Facebook and Pandora, are buying ads to target specific individuals.

One week after Hurricane Maria tore through Puerto Rico, many on the island say they’re still waiting for help. Most of the island’s 3.4 million people remain without electricity. Food, water, fuel and cell service are scarce, especially outside the capital of San Juan, where thousands of federal employees from FEMA and other agencies are coordinating relief efforts.

Hurricane Maria left destruction throughout Puerto Rico when it slammed the island last week. It also tore down most of the communications infrastructure that connects the U.S. territory with the rest of the world, including the millions of Puerto Ricans living on the mainland.

The battle to fill the Senate seat left vacant by Jeff Sessions has become a battleground for different wings of the Republican party. Roy Moore and incumbent Sen. Luther Strange face each other in a primary runoff election Tuesday, but many in the party see it as a contest between the establishment and a more fiery populist branch.

Directors Lynn Novick (@LynnNovick) and Ken Burns (@KenBurns) tell Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd about the effort it took to produce their 18-hour documentary about the Vietnam War that con

With the coming of fall and cooler weather, comfort foods are on Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst‘s mind. Kathy brings Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young her takes on their favorites — coq au vin and mashed potatoes — as well as macaroni and cheese and her recipe for summer tomato soup that tastes just as good in fall.

On Saturday the Catholic church will beatify a priest from Okarche, Oklahoma. Three assailants murdered the Rev. Stanley Rother in Guatemala in 1981 during that country’s civil war. Pope Francis declared last year that Rother is a martyr, setting the stage for him to possibly become a saint.

The United Nations General Assembly is in session this week, and the top question on many minds: How will President Trump’s “America First” message mesh with the rest of the world?

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson revisits some of the week’s speeches to see how world leaders are addressing that and other issues.

As the sun set Wednesday night, Jews around the world began observing Rosh Hashana.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Rabbi Jeremy Fine of the Temple of Aaron in St. Paul, Minnesota, about the Jewish New Year’s meaning and rituals.

President Trump issued disaster declarations for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands after the passage of Hurricane Maria.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with U.S. Virgin Islands Gov. Kenneth Mapp (@govhouseusvi) about the recovery effort there.

Interview Highlights

On the situation after Maria

Montana has been ravaged by wildfires this season, and a new report out Wednesday examining climate change finds the new normal for Montana will be hot and dry summers.

More than 100,000 homes were damaged or destroyed in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, which left much of Houston underwater.

Officials in Puerto Rico are warning residents to prepare for catastrophic winds and floods as Hurricane Maria bears down on the island. The storm has already devastated the island of Dominica, where the governor describes the damage as “mind-boggling.”

Meteorologist Jeff Huffman (@HuffmanHeadsUp) of the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network gives Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson the latest on Maria.

Kids who start playing tackle football before the age of 12 are at much higher risk of developing behavioral and emotional troubles as adults, according to a new study.

Researchers found much higher rates of depression, apathy and other neurological problems among those who started young — whether or not they suffered concussions.

Four decades ago, evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins published a book that changed science. In “The Selfish Gene,” Dawkins argued that genes competing for survival not only drive evolution but also animal and human behavior. It was an abstract idea at first, but now scientists, including researchers at the Stowers Institute in Kansas City, are figuring out how selfish genes actually do their work.

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