Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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NPR Story
3:17 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Talking Pot With Teens In Colorado

Adams City High in Commerce City, Colo., has about 2,000 students. During the 2010-2011 school year, 105 students were disciplined for drug or alcohol-related school offences. These students had almost twice as many unexcused absences, more than three times the number of days of school suspension, and almost a full grade point lower average GPA compared to students without drug/alcohol related offences. (Jenny Brundin/CPR)

When Colorado voters passed Amendment 64 back in November of 2012, they set in motion an effort that has focused on setting up a system for people to legally obtain recreational marijuana.

But there’s been less attention on how to keep pot away from those who aren’t supposed to use it — anyone under 21 years of age. Parents and educators are struggling to fill the void, with public health campaigns only in the planning stages.

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NPR Story
5:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

How To Start Conversations With Total Strangers

Rob Baedeker and Chris Colin are the authors of "What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with Your Boss's Boss." (Ilana Diamond)

Have you ever gone up to an intriguing looking person at a party, tried to start a conversation and froze? Or perhaps you just babbled mundanely about the weather? Well, authors Chris Colin and Rob Baedeker can help.

Along with illustrator Tony Millionaire, they’ve published “What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with Your Boss’s Boss” (excerpt below).

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NPR Story
5:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

'Blood Moon' Begins Series Of Lunar Eclipses

Path of the Moon through Earth's umbral and penumbral shadows during the Total Lunar Eclipse of April 15, 2014. (Fred Espenak via NASA.gov)

Stargazers are in for a treat if they’re willing to stay up late tonight. A rare lunar eclipse known as a blood-moon will begin tomorrow morning at about 2 a.m. Eastern time. The full eclipse will last from about 3 a.m. to 4:30 a.m.

Kelly Beatty, senior contributing editor for Sky & Telescope magazine joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain the phenomenon, which is part of a “tetrad,” and the best time to watch.

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NPR Story
5:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Development Forces Out Pronghorn Antelope

A housing subdivision, a golf course and roads are named after the antelope that have been squeezed out by development. (Laurel Morales/Fronteras Desk)

When we think of the American West, we picture wide open spaces. But roads, new homes and commercial buildings have cut across those spaces.

That development is having an impact on the pronghorn antelope, especially in one of the fastest-growing areas in the Southwest: Prescott Valley in northern Arizona.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Laurel Morales of Fronteras Desk reports.

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Central African Republic Plagued By Ethnic Conflict As U.N. Pledges Help

A woman of the Pulaar ethnicity carries a baby on her back as she waits in line in the Begoua district, northeast of Bangui, to receive humanitarian and medical aid on April 9, 2014. (Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

As Rwanda commemorates the anniversary of the genocide there 20 years ago this week, its neighbor, the Central African Republic, continues to suffer brutal ethnic violence.

The United Nations Security Council voted unanimously yesterday to assemble a peacekeeping force to help stem the C.A.R. conflict.

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

What's Behind The Auto Recall Surge?

Following GM and Toyota, BMW is the latest auto maker to issue a recall of thousands of its vehicles. (Ron Sombilon/Flickr)

BMW is the latest automaker to announce a car recall. Yesterday, the automaker announced it’s recalling 156,137 luxury cars and SUVs because of possible stalling issues.

This comes on the heels of Toyota’s recall announcement this week, and General Motors’ recent vehicle recall notices. There have been more than 11 million vehicle recalls so far this year, and it’s part of the rapid rise of recalls in the past five years.

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Father-Son Team To Run One Last Boston Marathon

Rick and Dick Hoyt, Boston Marathon stalwarts since 1981, by the Hamilton Reservoir behind their home in Holland, Mass. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Later this month is the 118th running of the Boston Marathon, and this year’s race is especially significant because it’s the first time it’s being run since last year’s bombing at the finish line. Because of that attack, two people will be taking part in this year’s Boston Marathon who hadn’t intended to be there: Dick and Rick Hoyt.

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NPR Story
4:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Marking The 50th Anniversary Of The Civil Rights Act

This week, U.S. presidents are heading to Austin, Texas, to commemorate the 50-year anniversary of the the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Former presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are all scheduled to speak in addition to President Obama at the Civil Rights Summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

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NPR Story
4:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

DJ Sessions: 'Vibey' And Melodic With Anthony Valadez

Brooklyn electro-soul duo Denitia and Sene are among the artists KCRW DJ Anthony Valadez introduces us to in the latest installment of Here & Now DJ Sessions. (Mats Bakken)

KCRW’s Anthony Valadez joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for the latest installment of DJ Sessions.

From Brooklyn electro-soul duo Denitia and Sene to Toronto jazz trio BadBadNotGood, he brings us “vibey” and melodic sounds that might make you want to roll down your car window and drive.

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NPR Story
4:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Walmart Partners With Wild Oats To Sell Cheaper Organics

Wild Oats, a popular organic food brand in the 1980s, will soon be on the shelves in the grocery section of your local Walmart. Wild Oats products are projected to sell for 25 percent less than other national organic brands, and will likely bring about a huge shift in organics supply chain. (Bill Lile/Flickr)

Look out, Whole Foods. This month, Walmart will start offering a new line of organics about 25 percent cheaper than the national organic brands it already carries, and those sold by its competitors.

The giant retailer is partnering with Wild Oats to bring in a new line of organic products. Wild Oats was a popular health brand in the 1980s and was acquired by Whole Foods in 2007.

But the Federal Trade Commission challenged the purchase, saying it was concerned about loss of competition. Ultimately, Whole foods sold its holdings in Wild Oats in 2009.

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