Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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NPR Story
3:38 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Protests Breakout At University of Virginia After Violent Arrest

UVA students protest the bloody arrest of a junior by Virginia police officers. (Hawes Spencer/WVTF)

Photos of University of Virginia student Martese Johnson laying on the ground with a bleeding head and police holding his hands behind his back have led to protest on the university’s campus.

Johnson, a third year honor student, was taken in to custody yesterday in front of a bar near the university. Video of him yelling “how did this happen” and calling the arresting Alcohol and Beverage Control officers racists, has prompted the university president to request an administrative review of the incident.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Midwest States Push To Legalize Raw Milk

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control warns that one sip of unpasteurized milk can cause serious illness because it’s a fertile breeding ground for harmful germs like salmonella and e. coli. (Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media)

Federal health officials say drinking unpasteurized raw milk is unsafe and poses a threat to public health.

But, raw milk is gaining popularity in some circles, so several Midwest states are actually looking to legalize the sale of raw milk in order to regulate it.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Harvest Public Media’s Abby Wendle has more about the push to legalize raw milk.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Changing The Conversation With #IAmAStatistic

(L-R) Neil Osborne, Max Tilus,Tyler Holness, and Jack McGoldrick are behind "Statistic" -- to change the conversation about African-American men. (Robin Lubbock/Here & Now)

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 12:19 am

Over the past few months, a light has been shined on the African-American man’s experience, especially in relation to law enforcement.

Throughout the conversation, much attention has been given to statistics: how many African-American men go to jail, graduate high school and go to college.

Many of these statistics reflect African-American men’s experiences in a negative light, but what if the statistics focused on their positive accomplishments?

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Report: New Yorkers Have Longest Commute Time In Country

A report from the New York City Comptroller finds New Yorkers have the longest workweek, because they have the longest commutes in the country. (xymox/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 3:40 pm

A new report from New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer finds that New York residents with full-time jobs spend more time commuting than residents of other large U.S. cities, with average commutes of 6 hours and 18 minutes a week.

That translates into 49 hours a week that New York workers spend working and commuting, compared with 42 hours for Los Angeles.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Kathy Gunst Does Breakfast

(vastateparkstaff/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 2:22 pm

Do you skip breakfast? Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst used to. But then she worked on a book about breakfast and became a convert.

Gunst brings us recipes for granola bars, smoothies, and an open face smoked salmon sandwich for Jeremy Hobson to sample.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Scientists Discover More About 'Feel-Good' Gene

A genetic mutation found in about 20 percent Americans makes them less anxious and more resilient. (Moyan Brenn/Flickr)

Can one particular genetic mutation explain why some people are more anxious and less resilient than others?

Scientists at the Weill Cornell Medical College studied a gene mutation discovered about 10 years ago that only about 20 percent of Americans have. It bathes the brain in a sort of ‘natural cannabis.’

The New York Times is calling it the “feel-good gene,” because of the correlation between the mutation and a lack of anxiety, and an ability to bounce back.

The Cornell researchers wanted to know if there was more than a correlation.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Is It The End For Benjamin Netanyahu?

An Israeli ultra-orthodox Jewish man casts his ballot at a polling station in Jerusalem on March 17, 2015. (Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images)

As voters in Israel head to the polls today, Benjamin Netanyahu is fighting for his political life. His once implausible challenger Isaac Herzog has risen in the public opinion polls and could end up the winner in today’s election.

Jerusalem Post’s deputy managing editor Tovah Lazaroff joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to take a look at what’s motivating voters, and what a change in leadership in Israel would mean.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Netanyahu Trailing Slightly Before Israel’s Election Tomorrow

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is trailing ever so slightly behind his opponents in the Labor Party, just before tomorrow’s parliamentary election. That’s according to the latest and last poll before voters cast their ballots tomorrow.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

States Scramble To Comply With Fed ID Cards

Increased enforcement of the federal REAL ID Act means Idaho driver's licenses may soon be unacceptable as ID at airports. (Idaho Transportation Department)

If you have a driver’s license you probably use it for more than driving: you verify your credit card, you prove your age if you want to buy a beer, you prove your identity to get on a plane.

But what if you showed your driver’s license and it was no good?

That’s starting to happen to people in a number of states that have yet to fully comply with the federal government’s REAL ID Act.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Jessica Robinson reports from Idaho.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Combating Bait And Switch In The Seafood Industry

The plan to stop seafood fraud will create a system to detect black market fishing and seafood fraud, and a system to track seafood from its harvest, all the way to U.S. port for market. (Bill Dickinson/Flickr)

Fish is a slippery business. Managing and policing the seafood industry has proved challenging through the years with reports of over-fishing, controversies about fish farming, and issues of oceanic pollution. Now, we can add seafood fraud to that list.

On Sunday, a task force convened by the Obama administration released an action plan to stop seafood fraud.

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