Matt Bingay

Assistant General Manager, Programming / All Things Considered Host

Matt Bingay is Assistant General Manager for Programming on WMRA and WEMC and the local host for All Things Considered.

Matt began working for WMRA as a student at James Madison University in 1992.  And except for a brief year at New Hampshire Public Radio in Concord, Matt has spent the majority of his public radio career at WMRA.

Matt is also an amateur violist and guitarist, has played soccer since grade school (and still plays today), is always reading something (fiction and non-fiction), has a few marathons under his belt and loves living in the Shenandoah Valley.

Ways to Connect

America Abroad Media

Do We Need Humans?

Mar 7, 2014
Thinkstock

In this episode, TED speakers consider the promises and perils of our relationship with technology.

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Good Sport

Mar 5, 2014
M. Smelter

Nobody knows their exact price tag, but the Sochi Olympics were widely hailed as the most expensive Olympic games ever. And the real question: is it worth the cost? Political science professor Patrick Rhamey (Virginia Military Institute) says hosting the games doesn’t actually give countries a political advantage, but winning the medal count can. Plus: The United States is the only country that attaches big-time sports to universities.

Life aboard the USS John C. Stennis, an aircraft carrier that was stationed in the Arabian Sea and supported bombing missions over Afghanistan. Only a few dozen people on board actually fly jets. It takes the rest of the crew — over 5,000 people — to keep them in the air. This American Life producers visited the Stennis in 2002, about six weeks into its deployment. The hour is devoted to this one story.

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Extrasensory

Feb 28, 2014
iStockphoto

In this hour, TED speakers question whether we can experience the world more deeply by not only extending our senses — but going beyond them.

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Angela Radulescu

Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison was born Chloe Wofford in 1931. She was 39 when she published her first novel about a black girl’s painful coming of age in a white society. The Bluest Eye and many subsequent works have earned Morrison the highest accolades in literature and established her as one of America’s leading fiction writers. Nikki Giovanni (Virginia Tech) and Joanne Gabbin (James Madison University) paid tribute to Morrison with an extravaganza at Virginia Tech that included nationally renowned writers, singers, and poets, including Maya Angelou.

Hosted by legendary Sound of Philadelphia (TSOP) music producer Kenny Gamble, GOING BLACK: THE LEGACY OF PHILLY SOUL RADIO, will examine the legacy of Black radio in Philadelphia with a special focus on the legendary radio station WDAS.

Rodney Versus Death

Feb 22, 2014
Virgil Finlay [Public domain]/Wikimedia Commons)

What do you do in the face of a monstrous disease with a 100% fatality rate? In this short, a Milwaukee doctor tries to knock death incarnate off its throne.

In the fall of 2004, Jeanna Giese checked into the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin with a set of puzzling symptoms ... and her condition was deteriorating fast. By the time Dr. Rodney Willoughby saw her, he only knew one thing for sure: if Jeanna's disturbing breakdown turned out to be rabies, she was doomed to die.

Surrogates

Feb 22, 2014

This week we look at people who see themselves in others and try to live out their lives through stand-ins — including the story of what one father saw in the convicted murderer he decided to adopt. And the proxy battle over a woman’s honor that became a presidential obsession.

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Identities

Feb 21, 2014
Ryan McVay/Getty Images

In this hour, TED speakers describe their journeys to answer the question: who am I?

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Usually during Black History Month, we remember civil rights icons and reflect on their legacy. But over the past couple of years, SOTRU has met a new generation of African American leaders, people you may not see on TV specials or making nationally acclaimed speeches. Most of these men and women are on the front lines of their communities, rolling up their sleeves and diving in to what can be very unglamorous work.

Listen and learn more here.

Dead Reckoning

Feb 15, 2014

From a duel with the world's deadliest disease to a surprising peek into the way doctors think about death, in this hour Radiolab tries to reckon with the grim reaper. And, in the end, we confront the question at the heart of it all — when the time comes to finally leave, how do we want to go? 

Mike Anderson was 36 years old, married, a suburban father of four. He owned a contracting business and built his family’s modest, three-bedroom house in St. Louis from the ground up. He volunteered at church on the weekends and coaches his son’s football team. All pretty normal, right? Except for one thing … which surfaced one day last summer.

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Simply Happy

Feb 14, 2014

In this hour, finding happiness may be simpler than you think.

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Brow Anxiety

Feb 12, 2014

During the 1910s and 1920s, the question of whether one was “highbrow” or “lowbrow” became a concern in the minds of modernist Americans. Brooks Hefner (James Madison University) says this “brow anxiety” dominated the career of Willard Huntington Wright, who fancied himself an intellectual aristocrat while secretly writing a series of wildly popular detective stories under the pseudonym S.S. Van Dine. And: When Christopher McGee (Longwood University) first discovered the Hardy Boys books as a child, he had no idea the author, Franklin W.

Pete Souza

Join WMRA and NPR for live special coverage of President Obama's State of the Union address. The address will begin at 9pm this Tuesday night and our coverage will include the Republican response.

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, WMRA presents State of the Re:Union - Who Is This Man? at 3pm, Monday, January 20th.

This December, as you remember and think back over the year, remember WMRA. Your support is needed to help us bring you another year of stories, conversations and deep analysis.

NPR's Here & Now is now on at 1pm weekdays, allowing us to present the full 2-hour program from 1pm - 3pm, Monday through Thursday, and a single hour at 1pm Friday.

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