Bob Leweke

News Director / Morning Edition Host

Bob Leweke is WMRA's News Director and Morning Edition host.

Before coming to public radio in 2003, Bob had worked for The Roanoke Times as a circulation manager and writer.  He later became a member of the communication faculty at Pikeville College in Kentucky, and at Bridgewater College in Virginia.  Bob holds degrees in communication and political science from Virginia Tech, and a doctorate in mass communication from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

In his hours away from WMRA, Bob enjoys music, cycling, reading and movie-watching, and spending time with his family doing all of the above.  You can follow him on Twitter @WMRAbob.

Ways To Connect

Jessie Knadler explores the new horizon of stem cell therapy for the family pet... Kara Lofton checks in with two Methodist pastors suspended for officiating the weddings of two same-sex couples... and we've got this week's episodes of The Spark and Our Island Universe.

Another story that hit close to home for many of us was the murder of Alison Parker and Adam Ward, reporters for WDBJ TV, on August 26, while they were doing their jobs.  There are links through the WDBJ website to memorial funds in their honor.  To find out more, click here.

Sefe Emokpae tells us what the Music Resource Center in Charlottesville has been up to during its 20 years, and Emily Richardson-Lorente takes a seat in the audience at the Garage, a different kind of music venue there.... Also, Kara Lofton filed two stories, one of which went viral big time: first, her account of "The Pause," a relatively new practice among trauma and emergency medical workers after the death of a patient, and then a look at local "Nones," particularly millennials, who are increasingly checking the "None" box for religious affiliation.... We also step into the Wayback Machine to Day 1 of the WMRA Newsroom, for Andrew Jenner's first WMRA story, one year ago.

Sefe Emokpae takes us to a winery near Charlottesville that's trying hard to stand out in Virginia's wine country... Kara Lofton concludes our "Clean Virginia" series with a look towards the sun... and because there may be a mountain lion roaming around Milwaukee, what better excuse to revisit "Schrodinger's Cougar"?  Also, this week's Spark.

This week, Scott Lowe toured the 20-year-old Virginia Quilt Museum, containing centuries-old quilts.... Kara Lofton brought us new water consumption guidelines for athletes, and the views of opposite sides over the Confederate flag.... and Jessie Knadler finds out why the cash-strapped Buena Vista Police Department spent nearly $50,000 on a new drug-sniffing dog.

WMRA’s Kara Lofton took a tour of Harrisonburg's booming food trucks, which are so popular they have their own parks.... Jessie Knadler exposes the invasive bug killing Virginia's hemlock trees, and explores solutions.... And we revisit Kara's story of a same-sex married couple fighting for parenthood rights.  Plus, this week's installment of The Spark.

WMRA's Kara Lofton was busy again this week, with a conversation with Trent Wagler of the Steel Wheels about the "roots" of Red Wing... she also reported on an appeals court victory by the EPA and Chesapeake Bay activists, and on Virginia's air quality as part of "Clean Virginia"... and she explained the connection between the University of Virginia and the New Horizons mission to Pluto... and, finally, we replay Andrew Jenner's "Pipeline Air Force" story, which is now the winner of an Outstanding Feature Reporting award from the Virginia Association of Broadcasters.

Welcome WMRA's Amy Loeffler to the newsroom.  She posted a story about what could be the hot new thing for gastronomes in Virginia agriculture:  Truffles.... Kara Lofton posted the next installment of our "Clean Virginia" series.... and, because it's Independence Day weekend, we dip into the archives from the "Becoming American" series.  And, in this week's Spark segment, Martha Woodroof talks with former Bridgewater -- and soon-to-be Sweet Briar – College president Philip Stone.

This week, WMRA's Kara Lofton posted the next in our "Clean Virginia" series, with a look at the legacy of Mercury contamination in the Shenandoah Valley.... and she also looked at the death and resurrection (at least for now) of a small, private college -- Sweet Briar.  Bob Leweke also had a conversation with Nancy Insco, an advocate and case-worker for women getting out of prison, and the News Leader's Patricia Borns, about the conversation that newspaper hosted, called "Roadmap to Re-Entry," in Staunton earlier in the week.

Courtesy of Dave Fritz, executive editor of the News Leader

On Wednesday evening, June 24, the News Leader in Staunton fostered a community conversation at Staunton’s city hall.  The gathering was called “Roadmap to Re-entry,” and was a follow-up to the paper’s reporting in March on the struggles that many incarcerated women face when they’re released from prison.  Bob Leweke spoke with the News Leader’s Patricia Borns, and with Nancy Insco, CEO of the Institute for Reform and Solutions in Staunton, an agency that works with these women.  I asked Insco about her takeaway from this first session.

This week we took a deep look at a struggling wind power project proposed for the shores off Virginia, and Kara Lofton took the measure of honeybee health in Virginia, plus a "moon art" project involving a JMU art professor, and a teenager doing her part to find homes for stray dogs.

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