WMRA News

Emily Richardson-Lorente

If you’ve got middle schoolers, chances are you’ve heard of Minecraft. It’s a video game with blocky graphics, a single level and no story line. But it’s also an obsession for millions of kids — and many adults — who will happily spend hours digging for resources, building houses and fighting off monsters. If that sounds to you like just another on-screen waste of time, WMRA’s Emily Richardson-Lorente has some good news for you.

This week, thousands of people will come to Charlottesville for the 22nd annual Virginia Festival of the Book. As WMRA’s Sefe Emokpae reports, this year’s event is expected to be the biggest yet.

Staunton Stories

Mar 14, 2016
Wikipedia Commons

Saturday, March 19, the Staunton Downtown Development Authority is kicking off their 20th anniversary by hosting Staunton Stories, a one day event to celebrate and document life in Staunton. 

On this weekend's Second Look, WMRA's Jessie Knadler talks to those who still feel left out of Virginia's slowly changing laws restricting the use of marijuana extracts for medicine.... We talk to Virginia lawmakers about the prospects of a Trump nomination.... And we turn the pages of a book that explores the punishment of a black woman a century ago.... We've also got The Spark and Our Island Universe!

Stephen Voss for NPR

Join WMRA for an afternoon with NPR All Things Considered co-host Ari Shapiro.  

News Director Bob Leweke will be interviewing Ari Shapiro, live on stage, Saturday, April 9th at UVa's Ruth Caplin Theater. The conversation begins at 1pm and is free and open to the public.

Last year, Virginia allowed patients with epilepsy to possess certain medical marijuana oils. Earlier this week, the General Assembly voted to allow these oils to be manufactured and distributed in state so epileptic patients – but only epileptic patients – can get them without crossing state lines. But the laws still leave patients suffering from other diseases feeling marginalized. WMRA’s Jessie Knadler explores what some are calling “medical discrimination."

There's one more Amazon Echo to giveaway and it will happen as soon as we reach $190,000.

In this week's edition of Second Look, WMRA's Christopher Clymer Kurtz, Jessie Knadler and Emily Richardson-Lorente went to their respective neighborhood polling places and elicited the sentiments of voters, who went for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in Virginia.... Brit Moorer takes us on a tour of the Ragged Mountain Reservoir near Charlottesville.... and Jordy Yager concludes our #RefugeesinVirginia series with a look at preparations for the next wave of Congolese refugees, and the work of the pastor of a little church in Barboursville.  We've also got this week's installment of The Spark!

Brit Moorer

Residents of Charlottesville and Albemarle County won’t have to worry about a drought draining the water supply anytime soon.  It took two years to fill and several years of planning, but now Ragged Mountain Reservoir has reached its capacity – and the rivers and streams around Charlottesville are protected, as well.   WMRA’s Brit Moorer reports.

Jordy Yager

In the final installment of our series on Refugees in Virginia, WMRA’s Jordy Yager takes a look at the next wave of refugees set to arrive in Charlottesville this year, and some of the people getting ready to help them.

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