Friday, Sept. 11, at 7:30 p.m. in James Madison University’s Memorial Hall, Wild Virginia hosts a screening of the award-winning student-produced documentary, “Won’t Pipe Down,” which tells the story of Nelson County residents fighting against Dominion’s proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline. WMRA’s Kara Lofton talked to one of the student filmmakers.

Kara Lofton

Although it's starting one day late due to severe weather Wednesday night, this weekend, 25,000 attendees will descend on Oak Ridge Farm in Arrington for the third annual Lockn’ Music Festival. WMRA’s Kara Lofton reports.

Independent film festivals have long been enjoyed for alternative, creative filmmaking and wide subject matter. WMRA’s Kara Lofton previews one regional festival – Skyline – that comes to Winchester on Thursday, Sept. 10th.

WMRA's Kara Lofton filed three stories this week with datelines from Charlottesville, to Richmond, to Harrisonburg.  First, she talked to the project team at the Center for Open Science about their big Reproducibility Study....  She also sat in on a meditation and yoga class for the inmates at the Goochland Women's Correctional Facility.... And she attended the early morning vigil for journalist Alison Parker.....

Kara Lofton

For the past year, three volunteers have been leading Buddhism, yoga and meditation classes for inmates at Goochland Women’s Correctional Facility outside of Richmond. WMRA’s Kara Lofton reports.

Kara Lofton

A vigil was held Wednesday morning on the quad of James Madison University in memoriam of Roanoke-based WDBJ-TV news reporter Alison Parker. Parker and photojournalist Adam Ward were shot and killed a week ago Wednesday by a former colleague during an early morning broadcast. WMRA’s Kara Lofton reports.

Kara Lofton

Last week, the Center for Open Science, a Charlottesville-based technology company, published a landmark analysis on scientific replication called the Reproducibility Project.  As it turns out, it’s much harder to replicate original research, at least in the social sciences, than you might think.  WMRA’s Kara Lofton reports.

Jessie Knadler explores the new horizon of stem cell therapy for the family pet... Kara Lofton checks in with two Methodist pastors suspended for officiating the weddings of two same-sex couples... and we've got this week's episodes of The Spark and Our Island Universe.

Another story that hit close to home for many of us was the murder of Alison Parker and Adam Ward, reporters for WDBJ TV, on August 26, while they were doing their jobs.  There are links through the WDBJ website to memorial funds in their honor.  To find out more, click here.

In March, two Central Virginia United Methodist Church clergy were suspended for marrying same-sex couples. WMRA’s Kara Lofton talks to the pastors involved and takes a look at where they stand now that the suspension is over.

Jessie Knadler

For a lot of people, pets are members of the family. And it can be heartbreaking to see a beloved dog or cat suffer from injury, or from hip dysplasia, degenerative joints, or arthritis. In years past, pet owners had to rely on medication, surgery or even in some cases, euthanasia to mitigate an animal’s suffering. Now, stem cell therapy is poised to revolutionize the veterinary field even as the hard science behind it has a way to go.  WMRA’s Jessie Knadler has the story.