WMRA News

Courtesy of the U.S. Supreme Court

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg visits Virginia Military Institute in Lexington on Wednesday, February 1. This is significant because Justice Ginsburg had a profound impact on the school by writing the majority opinion in a landmark case that forced the all male Institute to admit women. WMRA’s Jessie Knadler examines the impacts of that case.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

In cities and airports across the nation this weekend protesters responded to the recent executive order signed by President Trump that bans immigrants from seven countries with Muslim majorities. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz filed these excerpts from what people had to say at a rally in Harrisonburg yesterday.

Emily Richardson-Lorente

According to the Nature Conservancy, 85% of the world’s native oyster reefs have disappeared — including most of those in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists and environmentalists are working hard to rebuild some of those lost reefs, but one of the most promising solutions yet may be from a Charlottesville woman with no science degree, but a unique obsession. Emily Richardson-Lorente has the story.

Courtesy of Nancy Sorrells

The proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline is undergoing regulatory review.  Anti-pipeline and environmental groups are not satisfied with a recent report -- called a Draft Environmental Impact Statement, or DEIS -- from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, (FERC). WMRA’s Jessie Knadler reports.

One day after Donald Trump’s inauguration, the largest protest against a new president took place in Washington, D.C., and in cities around the world. WMRA’s Jessie Knadler caught up with a few locals who helped spearhead efforts to get people from our area to the Women's March on Washington, and she also was in Washington, for this report on the massive protest in the nation’s capitol.

NPR is live blogging today’s Inauguration events, including reports from across Washington D.C. and elsewhere.

Jordy Yager

William Faulkner famously wrote that ‘The past is never dead. It's not even past.’  And nowhere is that more evident than in Lexington, Virginia.  A tale of two cities played out there this past weekend, as rival groups took to the streets to celebrate two very different holidays: Lee-Jackson Day, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. WMRA’s Jordy Yager has the story.

Miranda Bennett

At this time of great political change and uncertainty, some Charlottesville residents are looking to history for direction. Their guide is the writer James Baldwin, as WMRA’s Miranda Bennett reports.

Courtesy of Seniors Connect

If you’ve ever grown frustrated trying to explain some super simple technology — like texting —  to an older person, OR if you’re a senior citizen frustrated by the condescending way your grand-kid told you that texting is “super simple,” this story by WMRA’s Emily Richardson-Lorente is for you.

The Housing Divide

Jan 11, 2017
Jordy Yager

The cost of living has steadily risen in Charlottesville, as has the average income.  But what happens when the city’s lowest wage earners can no longer afford to live there?  WMRA’s Jordy Yager has this report on the state of affordable housing in Charlottesville.

The NPR Politics team and reporters across the newsroom will be live-annotating a news conference with President-elect Donald Trump, expected at 11 am Eastern Time on Wednesday. We will be fact-checking and providing background to his remarks in real-time. We will be paying special attention to any comments about conflicts of interest, health care and national security.

The NPR Politics team and reporters across the newsroom will be live-annotating President Obama's farewell address in Chicago on Tuesday night, scheduled to begin at 9 pm Eastern Time. The team will be adding fact-checks and background to Obama's comments as he gives them. We'll be watching in particular for remarks on his legacy, national security, health care and foreign policy, among other topics.

On this week's Second Look, WMRA's Christopher Clymer Kurtz takes us along for a quiet drive in an electric car.... and as Republicans move to repeal the Affordable Care Act, he talks with demonstrators in Harrisonburg defending it.... and, he educates us on the role of service dogs in Virginia.... Kara Lofton explores the promise of, and barriers to, the use of telemedicine to bring health care to remote places.... and, Jordy Yager reports on Buckingham County's decision to approve construction of a key component of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline there.

Jordy Yager

The Buckingham County Board of Supervisors voted late Thursday night to approve a compressor station as part of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline.  WMRA’s Jordy Yager reports.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

High-end electric vehicles such as Tesla’s Models S and X are fast, powerful, glamorous -- and also expensive. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz wanted to know more about the view from inside a more subtle -- and affordable -- electric car.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

Yesterday Republicans began the legislative process to repeal the Affordable Care Act. In Harrisonburg, citizens gathered to call for Congress to fix, not nix Obamacare, as it’s widely known. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

Courtesy of Lindsey Kennedy

Rural Virginia still struggles with not having enough doctors – particularly specialists. But one University of Virginia program is working on trying to bridge that gap by providing a variety of telemedicine services. WMRA's Kara Lofton reports.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

Service dogs, you may be surprised to learn, are not necessarily professionally trained -- and they can assist people with a wide variety of disabilities, including post traumatic stress disorder. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

Kara Lofton

The South River and South Fork of the Shenandoah River have struggled with a legacy of industrial mercury pollution since the late 1920s. This year, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality has approved a plan to begin remediating and restoring contaminated riverbanks.  WMRA's Kara Lofton reports.  This story has been updated.*

Jordy Yager

On Monday night, more than 150 people packed into the Buckingham County Board of Supervisors’ monthly meeting. Most were there to voice their objection to the compressor station being sought as part of the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline.

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