Radiolab on WMRA

Saturday at 4pm & Tuesday at 3pm (on WMRA)
Jad Abumrad & Robert Krulwich

Radiolab, created by WNYC, is unlike any other program you have encountered. It is truly "must hear" radio. Each episode is an experiential investigation in sound and style... allowing science to fuse with culture and information to sound like music.

Radiolab believes your ears are a portal to another world. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and human experience. Big questions are investigated, tinkered with, and encouraged to grow. Bring your curiosity, and we'll feed it with possibility.

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Jad Abumrad

The son of a scientist and a doctor, Jad Abumrad did most of his growing up in Tennessee, before studying creative writing and music composition at Oberlin College in Ohio. Following graduation, Abumrad wrote music for films, and reported and produced documentaries for a variety of local and national public radio programs, including On the Media, PRI's Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen, Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and WNYC's "24 Hours at the Edge of Ground Zero".

Robert Krulwich

NPR Science Correspondent, Robert Krulwich, joins Jad Abumrad in studio as co-host of Radiolab. Robert Krulwich has been called "the most inventive network reporter in television" by TV Guide. His specialty is explaining complex subjects - science, technology, economics - in a style that is clear, compelling and entertaining. He has explored the structure of DNA with a banana, explained arbitrage by wearing Groucho glasses and illustrated the Texaco-Pennzoil battle with Barbie and Ken dolls. A Special Correspondent for ABC News, Krulwich appears regularly on Nightline and other news programs, including ABC News Tonight and Good Morning America.

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Radiolab
4:00 pm
Sat May 3, 2014

Blame

Susan Sermoneta/flickr/CC-BY-2.0

We've all felt it, that irresistible urge to point the finger. But new technologies are complicating age-old moral conundrums about accountability. This hour, we ask what blame does for us -- why do we need it, when isn't it enough, and what happens when we try to push past it with forgiveness and mercy?

Listen and Learn More Here.

Radiolab
4:00 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

Race

Race
Shea Walsh

This hour of Radiolab, a look at race.  When the human genome was first fully mapped in 2000, Bill Clinton, Craig Venter, and Francis Collins took the stage and pronounced that "The concept of race has no genetic or scientific basis." Great words spoken with great intentions. But what do they really mean, and where do they leave us? Our genes are nearly all the same, but that hasn't made race meaningless, or wiped out our evolving conversation about it.

Listen and Learn More Here.

Radio Lab
4:00 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

23 Weeks 6 Days

When Kelley Benham and her husband Tom French finally got pregnant, after many attempts and a good deal of technological help, everything was perfect. Until it wasn't. Their story raises questions that, until recently, no parent had to face… and that are still nearly impossible to answer.

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Radiolab
4:00 pm
Sat April 5, 2014

The Soul Patch

Taped window
xtopalopaquetl/flickr

This hour, stories of unlikely (and surprisingly simple) answers to seemingly unsolvable problems.

We get to know a man who struggles, and mostly fails, to contain his violent outbursts...until he meets a bird who can keep him in check. Then, Oliver Sacks and Chuck Close, who are both face-blind, share workarounds that help them figure out who they’re talking to. And a senior center stumbles upon an unexpected way to help Alzheimer’s patients -- by building a bus stop.

Listen and Learn more here.

Radiolab
4:00 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Apocalyptical

In this live stage performance, Radiolab turns its gaze to the topic of endings, both blazingly fast and agonizingly slow.

Listen and learn more here.

Radiolab
4:00 pm
Sat March 22, 2014

Super Cool

Jeffer Sandstrom

What do frozen horses and a scorching universe have in common? That's what we wanted to know.

When we started reporting a fantastic, surreal story about one very cold night, more than 70 years ago, in northern Russia, we had no idea we'd end up thinking about cosmology. Or dropping toy horses in test tubes of water. Or talking about bacteria. Or arguing, for a year. Walter Murch (aka, the Godfather of The Godfather), joined by a team of scientists, leads us on what felt like the magical mystery tour of super cool science. Are you ready? We're not sure we've recovered.

Radiolab
4:00 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

What's left when you're right?

More often than not, a fight is just a fight... Someone wins, someone loses. But this hour, we have a series of face-offs that shine a light on the human condition, the benefit of coming at something from a different side, and the price of being right.

Guests:Jonathan Gottschall, Lulu Miller and Pat Walters

Radiolab
4:00 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Rodney Versus Death

Virgil Finlay [Public domain]/Wikimedia Commons)

What do you do in the face of a monstrous disease with a 100% fatality rate? In this short, a Milwaukee doctor tries to knock death incarnate off its throne.

In the fall of 2004, Jeanna Giese checked into the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin with a set of puzzling symptoms ... and her condition was deteriorating fast. By the time Dr. Rodney Willoughby saw her, he only knew one thing for sure: if Jeanna's disturbing breakdown turned out to be rabies, she was doomed to die.

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Radiolab
4:00 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Dead Reckoning

From a duel with the world's deadliest disease to a surprising peek into the way doctors think about death, in this hour Radiolab tries to reckon with the grim reaper. And, in the end, we confront the question at the heart of it all — when the time comes to finally leave, how do we want to go? 

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Radiolab
4:00 pm
Sat February 8, 2014

Fate and Fortune

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nedieth/3351501055/

This hour, we question what decides the trajectory of our lives -- individual force of will, or fate?

If destiny isn't written in the stars, could it be written in our genes? Kids struggle to resist marshmallows, and their ability to holdout at age 4 turns out to predict how successful they're likely to be the rest of their lives. And an unexpected find in a convent archive uncovers early warning signs for dementia in the writings of 18-year-olds.

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