Morning Edition

Monday - Friday, 5am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne
Bob Leweke

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. National hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep, and local host Bob Leweke, bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite you to experience the stories.

On any given day, topics may include reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and discover the untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

 

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Music
3:28 am
Mon November 5, 2012

Lianne La Havas: 'The Golden Girl Of British Music'

The singer-songwriter released her debut studio album, Is Your Love Big Enough, this summer.
Ravi Dhar Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 10:07 am

Lianne La Havas was pretty much unknown until she appeared on the influential TV show in Britain called Later with Jools Holland. It was just her, singing and playing guitar. Her voice was clear, pure and soulful. The song she performed — called "Age" — was both jazzy and sassy.

"Time seemed to stand still," wrote one critic of La Havas' live performance. There were much more established artists on the music show that day, but Alison Howe, the producer, says La Havas was the standout.

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Economy
9:02 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Jobless Rate At 7.9 Percent; 171,000 Jobs Added

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renée Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
6:02 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Photo Helps Track Down Calif. Lottery Winner

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:01 am
Fri November 2, 2012

New Jersey Extends Deadline For Mail-In Ballots

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Someone at the Vatican is a fan of James Bond. We can relate, since this program did an entire Bond week this year. But we would have trouble matching the coverage in the Vatican newspaper. On Tuesday, it ran not one, but five articles about the new Bond movie "Skyfall." The five articles include a review calling it one of the best Bond movies ever. Just try to think of it not as entertainment, but as an allegory of good versus evil. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
4:58 am
Fri November 2, 2012

How Obama And Romney Differ On Climate Change

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Climate change was a big part of the announcement Mayor Bloomberg made yesterday endorsing President Obama for reelection.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Bloomberg owns a media company, is politically independent, and made his endorsement in a memorable way. He said Mitt Romney has taken sensible positions in the past but reversed course on all of them.

MONTAGNE: He also said President Obama's term has been disappointing. But he argued the president was better on a range of issues, especially climate change.

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NPR Story
4:58 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Some Economists Think Price Gouging Is Good

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. So, it was really hard to get gas in the New York area yesterday. One very simple thing could be done that might change everything: drastically raise the price of gas. Now, if that happened, we would surely consider it price-gouging. But some economists think it would be a really good idea. Here's Zoe Chace of our Planet Money team.

MICHELLE MEDINA: So, everybody here's OK? You guys OK? All right. Yeah, we're still on line with him.

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NPR Story
4:58 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Romney Back On The Attack In Virginia

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday - we've made it to Friday - it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
3:31 am
Fri November 2, 2012

U.S. Offers New Details Of Deadly Libya Attack

A Libyan military guard stands in front of one of the U.S. Consulate's burned out buildings on Sept. 14. The U.S. is offering new details of the attack on the consulate that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.
Mohammad Hannon AP

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Once a mob began attacking the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on the night of Sept. 11, officials in Washington, D.C., watched with alarm. Now, new details are emerging about their response to the deadly attack.

President Obama and his entire national security team monitored what was going on half a world away. Army Gen. Carter Ham, who was the regional commander for Africa, happened to be in Washington that day.

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Animals
8:00 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Move Over, Parrot: Elephant Mimics Trainer At Zoo

Koshi, an elephant, makes sounds that imitate Korean words.
Stoeger, et. al. Current Biology

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 11:43 am

Scientists say an Asian elephant at a South Korean zoo can imitate human speech, saying five Korean words that are readily understood by people who speak the language.

The male elephant, named Koshik, invented an unusual method of sound production that involves putting his trunk in his mouth and manipulating his vocal tract.

"This is not the kind of sound that Asian elephants normally make, and it's a dead-on match of the speech of his trainers," says Tecumseh Fitch of the University of Vienna in Austria.

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Strange News
5:57 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Chain In U.K. Tries To Lift 'Coffee Confusion'

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A coffee chain in Britain surveyed its customers and found 70 percent suffered coffee confusion. So the chain is now offering a new trial menu in plain English. A latte is now really, really milky coffee, a cappuccino - frothy coffee, and a mocha -chocolate flavored coffee. Not listed: a decaf soy triple tall latte, though some baristas might just call that - Why Bother. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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