Morning Edition

Monday - Friday, 5am - 9am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne
Bob Leweke

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. National hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep, and local host Bob Leweke, bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite you to experience the stories.

On any given day, topics may include reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and discover the untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Law
3:04 am
Thu February 14, 2013

The Drug Laws That Changed How We Punish

The Jan. 4, 1973, edition of the New York Daily News reports that Gov. Rockefeller's State of the State speech called for a life sentence for drug pushers.
New York Daily News via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

The United States puts more people behind bars than any other country, five times as many per capita compared with Britain or Spain.

It wasn't always like this. Half a century ago, relatively few people were locked up, and those inmates generally served short sentences. But 40 years ago, New York passed strict sentencing guidelines known as the "Rockefeller drug laws" — after their champion, Gov. Nelson Rockefeller — that put even low-level criminals behind bars for decades.

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Latin America
3:01 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Will 'Made In Haiti' Factories Improve Life In Haiti?

Workers prepare the foundation for a new warehouse and manufacturing facility at the Caracol Industrial Park in northern Haiti. The park, which opened last year, is still under construction.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

Three years after the devastating Port-au-Prince earthquake, one of the largest international relief projects in Haiti isn't anywhere near where the quake hit. It's an industrial park on the north coast halfway between Cap-Haitien and the border with the Dominican Republic.

Aid agencies are pouring millions of dollars into the project to encourage people to move out of the overcrowded capital and create jobs. Critics, however, say the jobs don't pay enough to lift people out of poverty.

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Music Interviews
5:23 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Bryan Ferry: A Forward-Looking Musician Turns To The Past

The Bryan Ferry Orchestra's new album is titled The Jazz Age.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

Throughout his career, English musician Bryan Ferry has been one of popular music's most forward-looking performers. His band Roxy Music remodeled rock into an artsy, cosmopolitan sound in the early '70s and spearheaded the New Romantic style of the '80s.

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Around the Nation
7:53 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Sen. Rubio Parched By State Of The Union Response

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Republican Senator Marco Rubio delivered the Republican reply to the State of the Union. In mid-critique, Rubio wanted water but water was out of reach. The senator ducked down, reached off screen, found it, sipped it and resumed. But the Twittersphere had left the building. Water tweets flooded the nation. Rubio tweeted too - a picture of his water bottle. You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:32 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Sewage Plant Offers Valentine's Day Tour

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

In New York, it's hard to get a dinner reservation to a trendy restaurant on Valentine's Day. And apparently, for hipsters in Brooklyn's Greenpoint neighborhood, it can be tough to get a spot on a romantic tour of a sewage treatment plant. New York's Department of Environmental Protection says this Valentine's Day, it had to add an extra tour because of the demand. Why the sewage plant tour is so trendy? Hmm, maybe the pheromones.

Animals
6:24 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Affenpinscher Is Westminster's Top Dog

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 6:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It is a scruffy, little black pooch named Banana Joe that is now America's new top dog. Joe, an Affenpinscher, won Best in Show last night in New York at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

Josh Dean is author of the book "Show Dog." And he joined us to talk about the results. Good morning.

JOSH DEAN: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: So, a lot of people may not know what an Affenpinscher actually is.

(LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: Why don't you describe the breed for us?

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NPR Story
6:01 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an unlikely call for assistance.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NPR Story
6:01 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Lawmakers React To State Of The Union Address

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And also watching the president's address last night was NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith. She was in the chamber and spoke to members of Congress afterwards.

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NPR Story
6:01 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Close Read: Reviewing Obama's State Of The Union Address

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 6:56 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News with Linda Wertheimer. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Throughout today's program, we're hearing parts of President Obama's State of the Union Address and many reactions to it. This is the part of the program where we take a close read of the speech. We've done this nine years running. In some cases we're checking facts. And in other cases we're asking what some parts of the speech really mean.

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Working Late: Older Americans On The Job
3:43 am
Wed February 13, 2013

For One Senior, Working Past Retirement Age Is A Workout

John David, 73, teaches fitness classes to help older people stay healthy and fit. Here he teaches an hourlong class at the 92nd Street Y in New York City.
Shiho Fukada for NPR

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 8:29 pm

Increasingly, people are continuing to work past 65. Almost a third of Americans between the ages of 65 and 70 are working, and among those older than 75, about 7 percent are still on the job. In Working Late, a series for Morning Edition, NPR profiles older adults who are still in the workforce.

Retirement isn't what it used to be, or even when it used to be.

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