Morning Edition

Monday - Friday, 5am - 9am
  • Hosted by Bob Leweke, Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. National hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep, and local host Bob Leweke, bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite you to experience the stories.

On any given day, topics may include reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and discover the untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

It's David Letterman Day In Indianapolis

May 20, 2015
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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That's One Way To Deal With A Loose Tooth

May 20, 2015
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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Eight-year-old Calvin Stanley of Montana was desperate to get rid of a loose tooth.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

CALVIN STANLEY: My name is Calvin, and this is the Montana tooth pull.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Abandoned Books Spark Long Career In Law

May 19, 2015
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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

For most Americans, New Year's is fairly personal. It's a time to make resolutions and down some champagne — and it was also a couple of weeks ago. But for Berbers — the indigenous people of Northern Africa — the New Year starts this week, and it's an occasion to celebrate their heritage.

In Portland, Ore., some residents are celebrating Yennayer, the Berber New Year. It's a holiday that's not traditionally a big deal, but it's an opportunity to celebrate Berber culture, which hasn't always been easy to do.

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