Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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NPR Story
2:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

If Detroit Went Bankrupt, Why Is Philadelphia Paying?

An empty field north of Detroit's downtown, Oct. 24, 2012. (Carlos Osorio/AP)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:25 pm

When Detroit filed for bankruptcy last week, city comptrollers and treasurers around the country held their collective breaths. That’s because cities, it turns out, don’t file for bankruptcy in a vacuum.

Philadelphia is already feeling the effects of Detroit’s bankruptcy.

That city will pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in additional interest costs over the next 20 years because the interest rate on Philly’s new $197 million bond offering is going up a quarter percent.

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NPR Story
2:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

London Marks One-Year Anniversary Of The Olympics

Inside the London Olympic Stadium in April 2012. (jeffowenphotos/Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:25 pm

A new poll shows two-thirds of UK residents believe the country got its money’s worth from the Olympics, even though the $13 billion cost was three times the original budget.

London is celebrating the one-year anniversary of the games this weekend with a big international track and field meet in the Olympic Stadium, featuring Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt.

The BBC’s Alex Capstick looks at the legacy of the London Olympics.

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

An Argument Against Standing Desks

(Pace McCulloch)

One office worker says he enjoys sitting and he’s tired of the “superior moral attitude” from the standers around him.

Writer Ben Crair told Here & Now he accepts the medical studies showing that sitting at your desk is bad for your health. His objection to standing is based on “the pure satisfaction I get from sitting,” he said.

He argues there are other solutions to the health problem of sitting too long.

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

New Alzheimer's Research Could Lead To Treatments

Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of resident Catherine Peake, in Washington, Feb. 6, 2012. (Charles Dharapak/AP)

A new report in the journal Nature shows a significant step forward in figuring out what causes things to go wrong in the brain early on in Alzheimer’s disease.

The research could lead to new treatments.

More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is projected to triple by 2050. So there’s urgent demand for treatments — or even better, a cure — but so far, there has been little progress on that front.

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

DREAMer Hopes For Full Citizenship

Renata Teodoro is pictured in the Here & Now studios. (Here & Now)

As a child, 25-year-old Renata Teodoro was brought to the U.S. from Brazil by her parents, who lived and worked in the Boston area until her father’s asylum application was denied and her mother was deported.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Award-Winning Novel On Asian American Artists

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:55 pm

In “The Collective,” writer Don Lee tells the story of three Asian Americans who meet at college and eventually form an artists’ collective in Cambridge, Mass.

The novel is a meditation on friendship and what it means to be Asian and an artist in the United States.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Story Update: A Victory In Fight To Overhaul Penn Station

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:55 pm

There’s an update on a story Here & Now brought you in May, about the fate of New York City’s Pennsylvania Station.

On Wednesday, the New York City Council voted to limit Madison Square Garden’s permit to 10 years. Right now, the Garden sits on top of Penn Station.

With this decision, the stadium will have to find another spot. That’s great news to a couple of activists who said Penn Station was in need of a serious overhaul.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Remembering Faye Hunter Of 'Let's Active'

Faye Hunter, the founding bassist of Let's Active. (Facebook)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:55 pm

Everybody knows R.E.M. but there were so many other southern bands that played the sort of jangly guitar pop that the boys from Athens, Georgia, made famous.

One of my favorites was Let’s Active, formed by Mitch Easter, Sara Romweber and Faye Hunter in 1981.

Any band that can produce a song like “Every Dog Has His Day” is OK in my book.

Well, Faye Hunter, who played bass and sang in Let’s Active, died on July 21, apparently a suicide.

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NPR Story
3:49 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Why Is Galesburg So Popular With Presidents?

President Barack Obama visits the Galesburg High School football team, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011, in Galesburg, Ill., during his three-day economic bus tour. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 4:04 pm

If you’re wondering why President Obama is in Galesburg, Illinois, he has been there before and it turns out he’s not the only president or future president to visit the small prairie town west of Chicago.

Fifteen men who were either in the nation’s highest office or went on to become president have made stops in Galesburg.

The first future President to visit was Abraham Lincoln in 1858 when he was running for the U.S. Senate.

One of the famous Lincoln-Douglas debates was held on the Knox College campus that President Obama is visiting today.

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NPR Story
3:49 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

President Obama Shifts Focus To The Economy

President Barack Obama waves as he boards Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Wednesday, July 24, 2013. Obama is traveling to Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., to kick off a series of speeches that will lay out his vision for rebuilding the economy. (Cliff Owen/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 4:04 pm

NPR’s national political correspondent Mara Liasson joins us to talk about the politics of President Obama’s economic speech at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois.

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