Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

Genre: 

Pages

NPR Story
2:42 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Debut Novel Asks: What's A Little Fakery For Family?

Boris Fishman is author of "A Replacement Life." (Rob Liguori)

In Boris Fishman‘s debut novel “A Replacement Life,” Slava is an immigrant from the former Soviet Union who wants to make it as a writer at a prestigious magazine. In order to do so, he moves to Manhattan and minimizes contact with his family in Brooklyn.

Read more
NPR Story
2:42 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Charles Wright Named 20th U.S. Poet Laureate

Charles Wright, pictured here in 2006, has been named the 20th U.S. Poet Laureate. (Library of Congress)

The Library of Congress has chosen Southern writer Charles Wright to serve as the nation’s next poet laureate beginning this fall.

Wright hails from Pickwick Dam, Tennessee. For years, he was a professor at the University of Virginia.

He began writing poetry while he was stationed in Italy with the U.S. Army, inspired by the work of Ezra Pound.

In announcing the selection, Librarian of Congress James Billington says Wright is a master of the “meditative, image-driven lyric.”

Read more
NPR Story
2:42 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Does Lockdown Training Save Lives?

Students receive training for barricading a classroom door in the event of a shooter entering their school as part of the ALICE program. (ALICE Training Institute)

New details are emerging today about the school shooting at Reynolds High School in Troutdale, Oregon, earlier this week.

Officials have identified the shooter as freshman student Jared Michael Padgett, and say he was armed with an AR-15 rifle and carrying nine loaded magazines, which could have shot off several hundred rounds. The gun and ammunition belonged to the boy’s family. Padget killed fellow freshman Emilio Hoffman and wounded a teacher.

Read more
NPR Story
2:49 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Political Thriller Author Brad Meltzer Wants To Thrill Kids With History

Brad Meltzer's "Ordinary People Change the World" series tells the stories of famous Americans such as Abraham Lincoln, Amelia Earhart and Rosa Parks -- as children. (Eric Ogden)

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:33 pm

Brad Meltzer is known for writing political thrillers like “The Inner Circle” and hosting the History Channel series “Decoded.” But he’s also the author of “Ordinary People Change the World,” a series of children’s picture books.

Read more
NPR Story
2:49 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Taxi Strikes Across Europe Protest Uber App

Roads are snarled on June 11 in London as taxi drivers stop their black cabs, blocking the street to protest over new technology they say endangers passengers. The strike action by taxi drivers hit many European cities, Wednesday, sparked by fears about the growing upheaval in the travel and transport industry, largely due to digital technologies like Uber. (Sang Tan/AP Photo)

City streets across Europe are jammed today as tens of thousands of taxi drivers block traffic. Cabbies in Madrid, Milan, Paris and London are protesting Uber, the smartphone app-based chauffeur service that they say is threatening their livelihood.

Read more
NPR Story
2:49 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

The Environmental Risks Of Corn Production

Nearly one-third of all U.S. cropland is used for corn. Growing corn uses a lot of water and fertilizer, and some of these production techniques, coupled with the effects of climate change, are threatening U.S. corn production. (Chris Bartnik/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 1:18 pm

Nearly one-third of all U.S. cropland is used for corn — but it’s not all the type you eat off the cob. More than a third of U.S. corn is used for animal feed, with another third grown for ethanol for cars.

Growing corn uses a lot of water and fertilizer, and some of these production techniques, coupled with the effects of climate change, are threatening U.S. corn production.

Read more
NPR Story
2:59 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

World Cup Preview

The 2014 World Cup gets underway on Thursday, when host country Brazil takes on Croatia. Then 63 more soccer games will be played until one of the 32 teams is crowned winner on July 13.

Bill Littlefield, the host of NPR’s Only A Game, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson and Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about the teams and the players, who are carrying with them the hopes of entire countries.

Read more
NPR Story
2:59 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Las Vegas Shooter Ranted About Police, Government In Online Videos

Jerad and Amanda Miller are pictured in a photo from Facebook. (Facebook)

YouTube videos have surfaced of 31-year-old Jerad Miller, in which he rants about not trusting police or government and relying on guns to protect himself from forces that want to limit his freedom.

He and his 22-year-old wife Amanda Miller shot and killed two police officers and a third person in Las Vegas on Sunday, before taking their own lives.

The Millers left a “Don’t tread on me” flag and a swastika on the body of one of the officers.

Read more
NPR Story
2:59 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Police: Gunman Kills Student In School Shooting

Police in Oregon say a gunman fatally shot a student at a high school near Portland.

Authorities said Tuesday the suspect also was dead and the situation is stabilized.

The Multnomah County sheriff’s office said there were reports of shots fired about 8 a.m. at Reynolds High School in Troutdale.

Authorities say they’re now focusing on reuniting students with their parents.

Read more
NPR Story
3:16 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Study Looks At What's Killing Centenarians

The population of centenarians — people age 100 and over — is growing across the globe.

People over 100 years are expected to reach 3.2 million by 2050, according to a new study by Kings College in London.

The study, which examined the cause of death among the growing demographic, found that centenarians are less likely to die of cancer or heart disease at that age, and more likely to die from pneumonia or frail health.

Read more

Pages