Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Bulger's Lawyers Will Appeal Murder Verdicts

James “Whitey” Bulger is facing life in prison after yesterday’s dramatic verdicts in his case in federal court in Boston.

The jury convicted him on 31 of 32 counts in a murder and racketeering trial that lasted nearly two months.

His sentencing hearing is scheduled for November 13, but his lawyers plan to appeal.

The verdict was overwhelming, but as WBUR’s David Boeri reports, nothing in the Bulger case is ever as straightforward as it might appear.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

What's Behind The Slowdown Of Emerging Markets?

Trader Michael Capolino, left, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013. Stocks are inching mostly higher in early trading on Wall Street after the government reported a pickup in retail sales last month. (Richard Drew/AP)

Conventional investing wisdom over the past couple years was that emerging markets, such as China, India and Brazil, are volatile but vibrant, whereas developed markets are stable but sluggish.

But it looks like emerging markets might be losing their shine.

Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal joins us.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

'Elysium' Is Latest Film To Tackle Income Inequality

Max (Matt Damon) and Frey (Alice Braga) fight to get medical care for Frey's child in the film Elysium. (Sony Pictures)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 4:40 pm

Elysium,” the new movie starring Matt Damon and Jodie Foster, depicts a world where Earth is a destitute planet, covered in slums and plagued by disease, home to only the poorest of souls.

The more fortunate get to live on a space station called Elysium, where the air is pure and medical problems can be zapped with the flip of a switch.

This isn’t the first time that income inequality has been tackled on the big screen.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Little Known About Trial of Bo Xilai — Except The Result

Then Chongqing party secretary Bo Xilai attends a plenary session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, March 11, 2012. (Andy Wong/AP)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 4:40 pm

China is in a holding pattern, waiting for the trial of a former rising star in the Communist party, Bo Xilai.

Bo ran the city of Chongqing — a metropolis of 30 million people. He is being tried on corruption charges, including taking $3.3 million in bribes.

Bo is considered by Forbes to be the 10th richest man in China. He is also suspected of involvement in the killing of British business man Neil Heywood — for which his wife Gu Kailai has been convicted.

So far, authorities have not said exactly when the trial will begin, or detailed all the charges against Bo.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Prisoner Release Precedes Middle East Peace Talks

A man holds a sign that reads, "Red week, the Israeli government releases twenty six murderers," during a protest in Tel Aviv, Israel, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, as people protested Israel's decision to release 26 Palestinian prisoners, most of them held for deadly attacks, as part of a U.S.-brokered deal that led to a resumption of Mideast negotiations. (Tsafrir Abayov/AP)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 4:40 pm

Israeli authorities are preparing to release a group of 26 Palestinian prisoners from jail in the next 24 hours.

It is a gesture intended to kick start a new round of negotiations.

Tomorrow, representatives of the Israeli government and the Palestinian authority will sit down together in Jerusalem and talk. The meeting will be chaired by the U.S.

The BBC’s Middle East correspondent, Kevin Connolly reports.

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

'Whitey' Bulger Guilty Of 11 Killings

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:29 pm

James “Whitey” Bulger, the feared Boston mob boss who became one of the nation’s most-wanted fugitives, was convicted Monday in a string of 11 killings and other gangland crimes, many of them committed while he was said to be an FBI informant. (Read the full verdict here)

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Will E-Books Be Passed Down Through Generations?

(mcbridejc/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:29 pm

After his aunt Eunice recently died, columnist Danny Heitman inherited many of her books — from Plutarch to coffee table books of her favorite artist, Andrew Wyeth.

But with the proliferation of e-books, Heitman wonders whether books will be passed on from one generation to the next.

In a recent column called “Can you inherit an e-book?,” Heitman writes:

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Sarah Siskind's Music, Rediscovered

Sarah Siskind has re-released her album, "Covered," under the record label of Justin Vernon, better known as Bon Iver. (Facebook)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:29 pm

NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson brings us new music each week to listen to.

This week, we’re reaching back into the archive, sort of.

In 2003, Sarah Siskind released an album called “Covered.” But as a result of severe sinus problems that required surgery, Siskind wasn’t able to tour and the album never really got off the ground.

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NPR Story
3:40 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Glut Of Lobster Brings Price To A 20-Year Low In Maine

Scott Beede returns an undersized lobster while checking traps in Mount Desert, Maine, May 21, 2012. (Robert F. Bukaty/AP)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:29 pm

Global warming and other factors are causing an oversupply of lobsters in Maine.

Canada, which is the largest importer of Maine lobster meat, experienced an early season and its own glut of lobsters due to warming waters.

Maine lobstermen have seen an 80 percent increase in their own bounty over the past few years.

The result is that prices have dropped to about half since 2007, says eighth generation lobsterman Jason Joyce of Swan’s Island Maine.

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NPR Story
3:39 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Ethiopian Women And Girls Find Work In Construction

Mekedes Getachew, 19, has been working at construction sites in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, since she was 15 years old. Except for the heaviest lifting, she says, the laborers "all do the same work and we don't really say this is a man's job, but when it comes to salary there's a difference." She earns $1.50 a day. Men earn $2. (Gregory Warner/NPR)

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:29 pm

Ethiopia is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. But behind the statistics and the figures is a cultural shift in a traditional society.

The vast demand for construction labor is drawing women into an industry dominated by men.

NPR’s Gregory Warner profiles one young worker and her quest to find a space of her own in the new Ethiopia.

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