Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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NPR Story
3:39 pm
Fri December 20, 2013

Target Fallout Continues After Security Breach

The fallout continues for Target Corporation, whose 1,797 stores have suffered one of the largest-ever credit card breaches in the U.S.

A class-action lawsuit was filed last night by a California shopper — the first of what lawyers expect to be a torrent of similar suits.

In addition, Target is likely to be subject to fines by card issuers for non-compliance with payment card security standards. And then, there are the fraudulent charges to consumers, which banks may also try to recoup from the Minneapolis-based company.

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NPR Story
4:39 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

From Hollywood Stardom To The Cloistered Life

Dolores Hart was a rising star in Hollywood in the 1950s and early 1960s. She appeared opposite Elvis Presley in the film "Loving You." In 1963, she chose the life of a nun. (Ignatius Press)

Dolores Hart was a rising star in Hollywood during the late 1950s and early 1960s.

She made her film debut opposite Elvis Presley in 1957′s “Loving You,” was nominated for a Tony Award for “The Pleasure of His Company” and co-starred in the spring break classic “Where the Boys Are.”

But in 1963, she stunned the film world when she entered the Abbey of Regina Laudis to become a cloistered Benedictine nun.

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NPR Story
4:39 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

The 'Affluenza' Defense

Ethan Couch, 16, was sentenced to 10 years probation after admitting to driving drunk in a crash that killed four people and injured several others. (Screenshot from WFAA-TV video)

On Tuesday, the Tarrant County district attorney’s office announced that it is seeking additional charges against 16-year-old Ethan Couch.

There has been widespread public outrage that Couch did not receive any jail time after he admitted to driving drunk in a crash that killed four people. A judge sentenced him to 10 years of probation and a year of in-patient treatment at a California rehab center that costs $450,000 per year — to be paid by his parents.

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NPR Story
4:39 pm
Thu December 19, 2013

Target: Problem Is Fixed, But Customers Should Check Charge Accounts

Target Corp. said information from some 40 million Target shoppers' credit and debit cards was stolen in the three weeks after Thanksgiving. (Jay Reed/Flickr)

Target says it’s fixed the problem that allowed credit and debit card information on as many as 40 million accounts to be stolen. It says credit card holders can continue to shop at its stores.

But the chain also says customers should check their statements carefully for unauthorized charges.

Customers who see suspicious activity in their accounts are being told to call Target at 866-852-8680.

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NPR Story
4:02 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

The Man Who Inspired 'Inside Llewyn Davis'

Armed with guitar, mike and enthusiasm, folk singer Dave Van Ronk performs at the Gaslight coffee house in New York's Greenwich Village on Nov. 8, 1963. (AP)

The new Coen brothers’ movie “Inside Llewyn Davis” has brought new attention to the folk scene in New York’s Greenwich Village prior to the emergence of Bob Dylan.

The brothers took inspiration from the real-life folk singer Dave Van Ronk, who released the album “Inside Dave Van Ronk” in 1963 and died in 2002.

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NPR Story
4:02 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

Sunday Assembly: A Look At Organized Non-Religion

A Sunday Assembly in London celebrates "Mythmas." (Jack Davolio)

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 10:12 am

Sixteen percent of people around the world say they have no religious affiliation. But even those who aren’t connected to a religion may still be looking for community.

That’s where the Sunday Assembly comes in.

In London earlier this year, stand-up comedians Pippa Evans and Sanderson Jones founded the godless congregation that they say has many of the elements of church, but without religion.

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NPR Story
4:02 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

USDA Pullout From Mexico Has Economic Consequences

Cattle move up a ramp following inspection in Presidio, Texas. (Lorne Matalon)

A little over a year ago, the federal government banned USDA inspectors from entering Mexico at five Texas border crossings to inspect cattle headed to the U.S.

That decision has had a huge economic impact on small border towns in Texas and now cattle producers and border politicians are asking for relief.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Lorne Matalon of Fronteras Desk has the story.

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NPR Story
3:48 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

An Unusual Way To Teach Math: Miming

Tim and Tanya Chartier present a classic mime stance. They have found a way to teach math through miming. (Ari Daniel)

According to the latest data from the Program for International Student Assessment, the U.S. ranks 26th in the world in math attainment.

Not so great for the world’s richest country, especially when you consider that 46 percent of all jobs require at least level 3 math skills — enough so that you can make change.

About 36 percent of all jobs require a level 4 math proficiency to do simple averages — something about 76 percent of Americans can do.

Beyond that, math skills drop off quickly.

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NPR Story
3:48 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

What The US Can Learn From Canada Ending Door-To-Door Mail Delivery

Canadian Stamps on mail. (Flооd/Flickr)

The financially-strapped Canada Post is phasing out home mail delivery over the next five years, replacing the door-to-door service with community mail boxes in central locations.

Canada Post will also cut 6,000 to 8,000 jobs in the postal industry, and raise the price of the postage stamp by 22 cents.

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NPR Story
3:48 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Tech Giants Invest In Internet Infrastructure

Google, Facebook and other major technology companies are boosting their efforts to control Internet transmission networks. They’re building private fiber-optic cables across the world, rivaling telecom companies like Verizon and Sprint.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Google began to build its network in 2008, long before the National Security Agency data mining scandal broke.

Tech executives say they’re building their own cable fiber networks to keep costs down and improve services as online traffic continues to grow.

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