Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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NPR Story
3:53 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

FDA Approves New Epilepsy Treatment

A new technology holds the promise of treatment for the nearly one million Americans with epilepsy who don’t respond to medications.

The FDA has approved a new implant that uses bursts of electricity to stop seizures before they start.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Todd Bookman of New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

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NPR Story
3:53 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Tracking Shopping Habits Helps Retailers Compete

Retailers are trying to find ways to better compete with online stores. Many are using high tech analytic tools to track consumer behavior through their mobile devices.

A company called iInside uses Bluetooth on mobile phones to tell big box stores, grocers, and even airports about consumers movements — where they go and how long they spend there.

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NPR Story
3:26 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

How Do You Get Your Own Wikipedia Page?

Judith Newman really wanted a Wikipedia page. She writes about the ordeal. (Wikipedia)

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:13 am

Correction: We inaccurately reported that Wikipedia is considering paying editors.  Wikipedia is considering what to do about editors who are paid to write wiki pages, but who don’t disclose the payment. For more information, please follow this link. 

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NPR Story
3:26 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Glacial Debris and Saturated Soil: A Geological Recipe For Mudslides

The following images were taken on March 24 during an aerial survey conducted by the Washington State Department of Transportation, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Geological Survey, and King County Sheriff's Office. (King County Sheriff's Office - Air Support Unit)

The official death toll from Saturday’s massive landslide near Oso, Wash., now stands at at least 16.

Emergency managers say they have located other bodies under the mud, and will add them to the total only after they’re recovered.

Dozens of people are still listed as missing or unaccounted for.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Tom Banse of the Northwest News Network reports on the ongoing rescue and recovery efforts.

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NPR Story
3:26 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Rough Ocean Complicates Search Efforts For Missing Plane

The cockpit crew of a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion are seen upon their return to RAAF base Pearce from searching for the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 over the southern Indian Oceanat in Bullsbrook on March 26, 2014. Planes and ships converged on the southern Indian Ocean on March 26, resuming the hunt for wreckage from Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 after weather conditions improved. (Jason Reed/AFP/Getty Images)

Malaysia’s defense minister is calling a satellite’s detection of 122 objects floating in the ocean more than a thousand miles southwest of Australia “the most credible lead that we have” in the continuing search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight.

But how will crews go about searching a potential crash site roughly the size of Alaska, where the ocean floor is at least 10,000 feet deep?

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NPR Story
3:26 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Geological Circumstances Behind Washington Mudslide

As search efforts intensify around the site of Washington state’s devastating mudslide, geologists are looking into causes of the rapid collapse of the 1,500-foot-wide segment of hillside in Snohomish County that suddenly cut away and crushed the homes and roads below.

The chief culprit appears to have been the glacial composition of the hillside, which is made of silt, clay and soil, and very little rock, which tends to be very loose.

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NPR Story
4:44 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Contraceptive Requirement Before Supreme Court

The Supreme Court will hear arguments today if Hobby Lobby and other for profit corporations can refuse to cover contraceptive services in their employee's healthcare for religious reasons. Activists rally outside the Supreme Court March 25, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

If a company’s owners have a strong religious objection to some kinds of contraception, can they refuse to include coverage for those types of contraception in their employee health insurance plan?

The President’s Affordable Care Act requires that large companies offer comprehensive health insurance to employees, including coverage for contraception. The administration has exempted religious groups from this requirement, but it has said that for-profit companies cannot be granted an exemption on religious grounds.

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NPR Story
4:44 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Surprising Questions On Your Next Job Interview

With the economy on the upswing and the job market getting stronger–why is it taking so much longer these days to get hired? A survey of job seekers from glassdoor.com found that since 2009 the time it takes from application to actually hearing about whether or not you got the job –has more than doubled. It now averages 23 days.

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NPR Story
4:44 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

529 Muslim Brotherhood Members Sentenced To Death

Today, an Egyptian court issued a verdict sentencing 529 members of the Muslim Brotherhood to death. It is the largest mass death penalty verdict issued in the country’s history.

Additionally, 700 more members – including the Brotherhood’s leader – were put on trial for charges that included murder.

NPR’s Cairo correspondent Leila Fadel joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the mass sentencing.

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NPR Story
3:46 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

A Trick For Bending The Laws Of Physics

You see it on T.V. all the time: cops interrogating a suspect in a cramped room while prosecutors watch from the other side of a one-way mirror.

The prosecutors can see in, but the suspects can’t see out.

Those mirrors are specially coated and lighting is used to create the one-way illusion.

Now engineers at the University of Texas in Austin have figured out how to create a one-way illusion with sound.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Matt Largey of KUT in Austin explains.

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