Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

The Mystery Surrounding The Johnson Twins of Tennessee

Residents of Chattanooga, Tenn., are still puzzling over the mystery of Andrew Gary Johnson and Anthony Larry Johnson.

Police discovered the decayed bodies of the twin brothers in their home a little over a week ago. But investigators think the brothers — who were in their early 60s — died about three years ago.

How they died is a mystery.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Art Imitates Life For Transgender Artists

From the "Relationship" series, 2008–2013 by Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst. Courtesy of the artists and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles.

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 2:07 pm

The Whitney Biennial has been one of the art world’s hottest shows for new artists.

This year, artists Rhys Ernst and Zackary Drucker are grabbing attention with their photo series, “Relationship.”

The photos detail their developing relationship and their transitioning bodies, as each travels across the gender spectrum. Ernst is transitioning from female to male, while Drucker is transitioning from male to female.

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NPR Story
6:22 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

A Visit With Renowned Composer John Harbison

John Harbison is pictured at his home in Cambridge, Mass. (Robin Young/Here & Now)

In 2004, Pulitzer Prize-winning American composer John Harbison released “Songs America Loves To Sing – Old and New Music for Winds, Strings and Piano,” a compilation of recognizable choral preludes with a twist putting the spotlight on the true meanings of the work. It includes hymns like “What a Friend We Have in Jesus” and classics such as “Anniversary Song” — which we know as “Happy Birthday.”

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NPR Story
6:22 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

George W. Bush The Artist Makes His Formal Debut

Portraits of world leaders which are part of the exhibit "The Art of Leadership: A President's Diplomacy," are on display at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, Friday, April 4, 2014. The exhibit of portraits painted by former President George W. Bush opens Saturday and runs through June 3. (Benny Snyder/AP)

Former President George W. Bush has found painting as his new passion to fill the void in his life after he left the White House.

In an interview on NBC’s “Today” show, Bush tells his daughter, Jenna Bush Hager, “I paint a lot because, as you know, I’m a driven person.”

The occasion was to highlight his portraits of world leaders, which he displays at his library in Texas.

One is of a grim-looking President Vladimir Putin.

Bush says “I got to know him very well. It became more intense as time went on.”

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NPR Story
6:22 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Earthquake Fear Rises In California

A picture taken on January 19, 1994 in Los Angeles shows a bulldozer tearing down a section of the Santa Monica Freeway that collapsed during the massive Northridge earthquake. A huge earthquake this week in Chile and two minor quakes in California are raising concerns if California is prepared in the even of another major earthquake.(Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

Geologists say this week’s huge earthquake in Chile is not directly related to two smaller Los Angeles-area earthquakes and one that struck off the Northern California coast recently, even though California has gone for an unusually long time without a significant quake.

In 1989, the Loma Prieta earthquake in San Francisco killed 63 and injured more than 3,700 people. In 1994, the Northridge earthquake in Los Angeles killed 57 people and injured more than 5,000.

Is California ready for the next big one?

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NPR Story
2:45 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Looking At The Legacy Of Kurt Cobain

Kurt Cobain of Nirvana during the taping of MTV Unplugged at Sony Studios in New York City, November 18, 1993. On the 20 year anniversary of Cobain's death and with Nirvana about to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, we look back on Cobain's lasting legacy. (Frank Micelotta/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 2:27 pm

It’s been 20 years since Kurt Cobain, leader of the rock band Nirvana, committed suicide. It was April 5, 1994, and his death left a legion of fans grieving his loss. But according to a new book, Cobain lives on in Nirvana’s music, and you can still see his spirit in culture and fashion. So with Nirvana about to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame next week, Cobain biographer Charles Cross joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to talk about the Nirvana frontman’s legacy.

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NPR Story
2:45 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Long-Term Unemployed Face Tough Odds Of Getting New Jobs

The Labor Department releases March jobs numbers tomorrow. Economists expect relatively good news with payrolls expected to rise by 200,000 in March.

But the outlook for the long-term unemployed is still murky. A recent Brookings Institution paper found that only 11 percent of the long-term unemployed find work again a year later.

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NPR Story
2:45 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Don't Try This At Home: Whales Set New Breath-Hold Record

Satellite tag being attached to the dorsal fin of a Cuvier's beaked whale. The tagging arrow can be seen in the air as it detaches from the tag. (Erin Falcone/Cascadia Research under NOAA permit 16111)

Researchers have documented a new breath hold record among mammals. They timed a dive by a whale off the coast of California that lasted two hours and 17 minutes.

To gather the initial results, which were published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS One, the researchers used barbed darts to attach temporary dive recorders to the dorsal fins of eight whales. The satellite-linked tags were made by a Redmond, Washington company, Wildlife Computers.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Acceptance Letters In Hand, Students Wonder How To Pay

(silversnake852/Flickr)

It’s that time of year again — when college acceptance (and rejection) letters find their way into the hands of nervous high school seniors. But that’s the easy part. Exponentially more complicated is figuring out how to pay.

The average cost of four-year-private college in 2013 was $30,094. The sticker price at in-state public colleges is close to $9,000 or $22,000, if you’re coming from out of state. And those jaw-dropping estimates don’t include room and board, books or even an apple to give the teacher.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Cass Sunstein On Conspiracy Theories

Cass Sunstein is pictured in the White House in March 2011, when he was Director of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget. (AP)

Harvard law professor Cass Sunstein says pick your topic — the tragic disappearance of the Malaysian plane, Ukraine, the NSA, the economic crisis, even the authorship of Shakespeare’s plays — and you can find a conspiracy theory.

Sunstein himself has faced hate mail and threats after his time in the Obama White House, and for his articles on topics such as FDR and the rights of animals. Glenn Beck repeatedly described him as “the most dangerous man in America.”

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