Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

According to historians Ed Ayers (@edward_l_ayers) and Brian Balogh (@historyfellow), President-elect Donald Trump would not be the first U.S. president to have an unlikely friendship with a controversial world power like Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Looking to eat healthier in 2017?

How about cutting down the amount of meat in your diet, even for just one day a week? It’s a movement called “meatless Monday,” and Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst brings Here & Now‘s Robin Young three satisfying dishes that put vegetables front and center.

President Barack Obama took office in 2009 with a goal to end the war in Afghanistan, launched in 2001 after the 9/11 attacks. But Obama will leave office with thousands of U.S. troops on the ground — an unfinished mission that the new president, Donald Trump, will inherit.

In an end-of-year interview with the health and medicine publication STAT, CDC Director Tom Frieden said he’s concerned that people mistakenly think the worst of Zika is over, and that it’s no longer a threat.

House Republicans have dropped plans to gut the independent Office of Congressional Ethics after widespread criticism and questions from President-elect Donald Trump about GOP priorities.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti discusses the reversal and what it means with NPR’s Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoNPR).

This year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most well-known technology conferences in the world.

The event, which is expecting between 165,000 and 175,000 attendees, will officially begin Thursday, with companies large and small showing off the latest updates for smart TVs, drones and cars, as well as some more unusual additions — internet-connected vacuum cleaners, washing machines and consumer robots.

If you are looking for a new taste sensation for the New Year: consider a small-batch soft drink from Squamscot Beverages. It’s a New Hampshire-based, family-owned New Hampshire company that’s been selling old-time sodas for generations.

New Year’s Eve is only a day away. There will be lots of celebrations to ring in the New Year — and with celebrations come toasts.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Maureen Zappala (@mzappala10), distinguished toastmaster with Toastmasters International, about how to give a great toast this holiday season.

In 1924 a Connecticut prosecutor saved a suspect from the gallows, in a case of justice that’s taught today in law books. The movie “Boomerang” was based on the case.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins looks back at the case, and how it resonates today in the debate of over sentencing and overzealous prosecutions.

Why Self-Driving Cars Won 2016

Dec 29, 2016

The automotive industry had a good year in sales. It had an even better year in innovation.

The Replacements remain one of rock’s best-loved bands. But they also lived up to the title of a biography released this year — “Trouble Boys: The True Story Of The Replacements.”

“Opportunity disregarded,” is the way author Bob Mehr (@bobmehr) describes the band’s career, which started when they formed in Minneapolis in 1979 and ended when the broke up in 1991.

For more than 30 years, several dozen developmentally disabled men were consigned to work in a turkey processing plant in a small Iowa town.

They lived in an abandoned schoolhouse in increasingly decaying conditions, were paid next to nothing for their work, had to pay for their own medical care and were often abused. They were virtually prisoners and for decades, almost no one did anything to help them even though the men were well-known in town.

African-American neighborhoods in Chicago are on edge as another holiday weekend approaches. Last weekend seven people were killed on Christmas Day alone — some of them at family gatherings — in violence that’s thought to be gang-related.

Chicago pastor Corey Brooks (@CoreyBBrooks) joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss ways to break a cycle of violence.

Secretary of State John Kerry outlined a vision for how peace in the Middle East can be achieved in a farewell speech in Washington on Wednesday. The speech comes less than a week after the U.S. abstained from a U.N. Security Council vote condemning Israeli settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem, angering Israel.

Kerry defended the move, saying the U.S. couldn’t “stand in the way of a resolution at the United Nations that makes it clear that both sides must act now to preserve the possibility of peace.”

Actress Carrie Fisher, who found enduring fame as Princess Leia in the original “Star Wars,” has died. She was 60.

Fisher’s daughter, Billie Lourd, released a statement through her spokesman saying Fisher died Tuesday just before 9 a.m PST. Lourd said her mother was “loved by the world and she will be missed profoundly.”

This year, the artist Christo (@xtojc_tweet) was finally able to present “The Floating Piers,” an ambitious project he and his wife and artistic partner the late Jeanne-Claude had begun to envision after completing “The Wrapped Coast” in Australia in 1969.

Charles “Wick” Moorman took over as president and CEO of Amtrak in September.

Moorman tells Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about his plans to chart a course for Amtrak’s future growth, and what Donald Trump’s infrastructure spending plan might mean for improving and modernizing the railroad network.

The BBC’s Paul Gambaccini speaks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about his friend, singer George Michael, who died on Sunday at the age of 53.

Michael rose to fame as a member of the duo Wham! in the early ’80s, and debuted solo with the album “Faith” in 1987. He sold over 100 million records worldwide.

From a fantastic documentary on the beginnings of hip-hop, to a British comedy about the intersection of sexuality and religion, 2016 featured a lot of quality television that didn’t gain mainstream attention.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans (@Deggans) talks with Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about the shows that are still worth watching even though they won’t be on anyone’s top-10 list this year.

Eight years after the financial collapse that sparked the Great Recession, two more major banks have reached a settlement with U.S. authorities for their role in creating and selling toxic debt.

Pages