Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

A Snapshot Look At Changes In Photography

Jul 13, 2015

Digital technology has changed the way we live today, and perhaps one of the greatest examples is photography. InfoTrends predicts that consumers will take about one trillion photos in 2015.

The use of cellphones to take photos has not only changed how and when we take photos but how we share them, as well. What does this mean for the basic nature of photography?

On Saturday the moment that tennis fans had been talking about for weeks finally came, a “Serena Slam” – four consecutive major titles. This is the 33-year-old American tennis player’s second Serena Slam.

Next month, Serena is positioned to make history if she wins the U.S. Open. It would be the first time a woman has completed a Grand Slam – winning all four majors in a calendar year – since Steffi Graf did that in 1988.

Several of the nation’s largest companies, including Starbucks, CVS and Walmart, have signed on to a pledge to hire 100,000 16 to 24-year-olds who are out of school and out of work.

It’s called the 100,000 Opportunities Initiative, and it’s designed to target “disconnected youth.” Roben Farzad, the host of Full Disclosure on NPR One, discusses this with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

Cameras orbiting the earth are becoming less expensive and therefore more widespread. And as Bloomberg News reports, the images collected are providing a lot of economic information, to everyone from investors to aid organizations.

Jeff Kearns writes in Bloomberg:

Baby Rhino Rescued In Northeast India

Jul 10, 2015

An baby rhino has been rescued Kaziranga National Park in northeast India. It is monsoon season in the park right now and not uncommon for young rhinos to get separated from their parents on the trek to higher land.

Now that the small rhino, just a few weeks old, is safe in the care of the International Fund for Animal Welfare and the Wildlife Trust of India, what happens next?

Here & Now concludes a series of conversations about Iraq and ISIS with someone who served in the Iraq War.

Retired Marine Matt Victoriano, who served as a scout and sniper team leader from 2000 to 2004, participated in the invasion of Iraq in 2003 and returned to conduct combat operations in Al Anbar and Babylon provinces.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is signaling diplomats won’t conclude an Iran nuclear agreement by early Friday morning, complicating American efforts to quickly implement any deal.

Under U.S. law, the seven nations negotiating in Vienna have to complete the accord before the end of Thursday in Washington to avoid invoking a 60-day congressional review period during which the Obama administration cannot waive sanctions on Iran.

If they meet the target, the review would only be 30 days.

DJ Session: Gospel Sunday

Jul 9, 2015

We turn to the music of the church pews for this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions. Our guide to gospel is Cecilia Webb, host of “Train to Glory” Sunday mornings on KUNM in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Webb says the music that began during American slavery is evolving, with some artists bringing in sounds of hip hop, rhythm and blues, and rock.

Officials at the New York Stock Exchange say a nearly four-hour halt in trading yesterday was the result of a technical problem. But most investors didn’t really feel the impact of the shutdown. The NYSE is now just one of many exchanges to choose from.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax about the glitch and its effects.

Showtime Vs. HBO: A Fair Fight?

Jul 8, 2015

Showtime brings back two hit shows this Sunday: “Masters of Sex,” about a pair of sexuality researchers working in the ’50s and ’60s, and “Ray Donovan,” centered on a clean-up guy for Los Angeles’ rich and famous.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to talk about the premieres and how Showtime might set itself apart from HBO.

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