Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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What Shapes Health
3:54 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Are American Workplace Policies Stuck In The 1950s?

Many more women have joined the workforce, but policies haven’t caught up – and that's affecting public health. (wackystuff/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 2:30 pm

People in the United States have shorter lifespans than in almost any other industrialized country in the world, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Lisa Berkman set out to find out why and what can be done about it. She's a professor of epidemiology and public policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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NPR Story
3:50 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Clinton Says She Should Have Used Government Email

Breaking her silence, Hillary Rodham Clinton conceded Tuesday that she should have used a government email to conduct business as secretary of state, saying her decision was simply a matter of “convenience.”

“At the time, this didn’t seem like an issue,” Clinton said in her first public comments since it was disclosed last week that she exclusively used her private email for government business and housed her communications on a personal server.

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NPR Story
3:50 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Kurds Launch New Offensive Against ISIS

Kurdish Peshmerga security forces stand guard on the outskirts of the northern city of Mosul, Iraq on June 14, 2014. (AP)

Kurdish Peshmerga forces are attacking ISIS in the oil-rich Iraqi province of Kirkuk. The offensive started yesterday and comes as Iraqi forces and Shiite militias try to retake Tikrit from the militants.

The two assaults are taking places as the Senate Foreign Relations Committee gets ready to consider President Obama’s request for authorization to use military force against ISIS for three more years.

U.S. fighter jets have been conducting airstrikes against ISIS targets for several months.

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NPR Story
2:35 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Getting Mental Health Help In High School

A poster at Rainier Beach High School's teen clinic lets students know they have a safe place to talk. (Ruby de Luna/KUOW)

It used to be that students went to their school nurse to have their sore throat checked, or to get a vaccine.

But many kids have needs that go beyond physical health, whether it’s dealing with exposure to violence, or having suicidal thoughts.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Ruby de Luna reports that a growing number of schools in Seattle have started offering mental health services in response.

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NPR Story
2:35 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

These Parents Say Kids Need Freedom. The Law Doesn't Agree.

From left, Danielle, Dvora, Rafi, and Alexander Meitiv are a family that rose to the national spotlight after Child Protective Services accused Danielle and Alexander of neglect for letting their children walk home from the local playground alone. (Courtesy of Danielle Meitiv)

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 1:41 pm

Danielle and Alexander Meitiv believe that the best way to raise children is to give them the freedom to play, walk and explore without parental supervision.

That philosophy got them in trouble when police picked up their two children – Rafi, age 10, and Dvora, age 6 – when they saw the kids walking home from a park one mile from their house in Silver Spring, Maryland.

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NPR Story
2:35 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Agencies To Overhaul How They Report Credit Scores

Equifax, Experian and TransUnion, the three biggest companies that collect and disseminate credit information, have agreed to change the way they report credit scores under an agreement being announced Monday.

The changes will take effect over the next three years or so and will impact how the industry handles reporting errors and how they list unpaid medical bills.

Credit scores can determine whether people can rent apartments, get home or car insurance or in some cases find a job.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri March 6, 2015

'Mockingjay' Director: 'I Love The Book. We Made This For The Fans.'

Director Francis Lawrence attends the premiere of Lionsgate’s ‘The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1′ on November 17, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

The highest grossing movie of 2014, “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1,” comes out on DVD and Blu-ray today. We revisit Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson’s November conversation with director Francis Lawrence about the rewards and challenges of bringing such beloved books to the screen. Lawrence also directed two other films in the series: “Catching Fire” and “Mockingjay – Part 2.”

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri March 6, 2015

Are The Spurs Leading The Way On Sports Analytics?

Tim Duncan #21 of the San Antonio Spurs dunks past Matt Barnes #22 of the Los Angeles Clippers during a 119115 Clipper win at Staples Center on February 19, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and condition of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Harry How/Getty Images)

The San Antonio Spurs take on the Denver Nuggets tonight in the Alamo City, Texas. The Spurs have won five NBA Championships in the past 16 years.

But it’s another award the team just picked up that we want to focus on. The M.I.T. Sloan Sports Analytics Conference named the Spurs the “Best Analytics Organization” and gave team manager R.C. Buford a lifetime achievement award.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Fri March 6, 2015

Rare Doubloon Wows Collectors At National Money Show

This rare Brasher Dubloon was minted in the United States in 1787. (Courtesy of American Numismatic Association)

Rare coin enthusiasts are gathered in Portland, Oregon for the National Money Show, a celebration of rare coins and bills.

Over $100 million worth of coins are expected to be displayed by dealers and collectors alike, but attendees expect the focus of the event to be the fabled Brasher Doubloon.

Struck in 1787, the Brasher Doubloons were the first gold coins ever struck for the United States and the first coins ever valued at $10 million.

The doubloon will take center stage in a convention full of historical curiosities and wild manufacturing errors.

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NPR Story
4:36 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Kentucky Driver Stranded 19 Hours With No End In Sight

Seth Slifer tweeted this photo with the note, "It's been 15 hours now and we haven't moved. It's a wonderful start to my vacation, and I should've brought a buddy." (Seth Slifer/Twitter)

In Kentucky, hundreds of people have been stranded in their cars and trucks since last night because of a storm that dumped over 20 inches in parts of the state. The stranded drivers are primarily on I-65 and I-24.

Seth Slifer from Franklyn, Tenn., is among those stranded on I-65. He spoke with Here & Now’s Robin Young by cellphone about the scene and how he’s holding up.

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