Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

St. Martin, St. Thomas and Tortola’s ports have all been closed indefinitely to cruise liners. What does this mean for passengers as the winter season approaches?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with cruise analyst Andrew Coggins, a management professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, about this hurricane season’s impact on the industry.

A musical based on the songs of 1970s singer-songwriter Dan Fogelberg has launched in Nashville. It’s called “Part of the Plan.”

Amy Eskind of Nashville Public Radio spoke with its LA producers about why they created the show, and chose Nashville for the opening.

As ISIS loses territory in Iraq and Syria, authorities in Europe fear that people who left to fight for the group will return to Europe and carry out attacks across the continent. There have already been examples of that in recent months.

The extent of the damage caused by Hurricane Irma in the Caribbean is still coming into view. On St. John, many residents remain without power and officials fear the fresh water supply is low.

But the devastation may be even worse on St. Thomas, where aid has been slowed by destroyed infrastructure. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with NPR’s Jason Beaubien (@jasonbnpr), who is in St. Thomas.

The mayor of Baltimore says she has no plans to remove the city’s monument to Francis Scott Key, after the words “racist anthem” were sprayed this week on a statue of him. Key wrote what would become the national anthem 205 years ago today while he was held captive on a British ship during the Battle of Baltimore in the War of 1812.

Former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli, infamous for price gouging and currently awaiting sentencing for a fraud conviction, has been sent back to jail. Shkreli had his bail revoked after he took to Facebook this week, posting that he would offer $5,000 to anyone able to obtain a hair from Hillary Clinton. Clinton is touring publicly to promote her new book.

Long-term care facilities across Florida are being evaluated as police investigate the deaths of eight elderly people who died in a nursing home after Hurricane Irma. The storm has knocked out power at a time of sweltering heat.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Associated Press reporter Terry Spencer (@terryspen) for the latest.

Bitcoin's Uncertain Future

Sep 13, 2017

JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon took another shot at Bitcoin this week, calling it a fraud and saying the market will eventually blow up. And late last week, state-owned media in China reported that Beijing plans to ban all cryptocurrency exchanges.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks about Bitcoin’s future with Jason Bellini (@jasonbellini) of The Wall Street Journal.

Two recent studies have found strong evidence that intestinal bacteria play a role in multiple sclerosis, an incurable autoimmune disease. The studies advance our understanding of how the microbiome is linked to multiple sclerosis and what potential treatments or prevention methods might be developed for the disease.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti talks with Sharon Begley (@sxbegle) of our partners at STAT about what the findings mean.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd sits down with Seth and Scott Avett of The Avett Brothers to talk about a new film about the making of the band’s Grammy-nominated album, “True Sadness.”

That film, “May It Last,” comes out today and is in theaters for one night only.

One of the coastal cities in Florida inundated with historic flooding after Irma was Jacksonville. The flooding was so severe in some places on Monday that the sheriff’s department said it had to rescue more than 350 people.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks to WJCT reporter Ryan Benk (@RyanMichaelBenk), who’s on the scene.

Airports across Florida are reopening Tuesday following closures due to Hurricane Irma. In order to get up and running again, airlines face many logistical hurdles in terms of getting equipment and workers where they need to be.

Plus, airlines have to look at the long-term losses that might come from hurricane damage. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Seth Kaplan of Airline Weekly.

Experiencing Irma In Naples, Fort Myers

Sep 11, 2017

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets two updates from Florida assessing the situation as Irma — now a tropical storm — moves through the state. She speaks with Randy Henderson, the mayor of Fort Myers, Florida, about how the storm has affected the city, and Ed Laudise, assistant principal of a school in Naples, where people were sheltered as Irma passed overhead.

At the White House and the Pentagon Monday morning, the president and first lady observed the 16th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

NPR’s Ron Elving (@NPRrelving) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss President Trump’s remarks, and also to look ahead to the week in politics.

Hurricane Irma hit hard in Turks and Caicos early Friday, knocking out all communications with the islands. Earlier this week the storm destroyed most of Barbuda and wreaked havoc on St. Martin and St. Barts.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Hugh Riley, secretary general of the Caribbean Tourism Organization, a development agency representing all 28 Caribbean countries. Riley is in Antigua, where he arrived Thursday night as part of an emergency response team.

Each summer, around 600 Mexican women come to Hooper’s Island in Maryland under the H-2B visa program to do jobs their employers say Americans don’t want.

Armando Trull (@trulldc) of WAMU reports that for more than two decades, the women have helped keep the iconic seafood alive.

Many of Evelin Salgado’s students at Cane Ridge High School in Nashville are DACA recipients, able to work, drive and enroll in college thanks to the Deferred Action Childhood Arrivals program.

As Hurricane Irma brings devastating winds closer to the mainland United States, the 6 million people who live in South Florida are preparing for the worst. Broward County, which includes Fort Lauderdale, on Thursday issued an evacuation order for people living east of U.S. Route 1.

In the aftermath of Harvey and with Hurricane Irma gaining strength in the Atlantic, people need essential items when they evacuate from their homes: medications, clothing and, for some families, diapers.

Courtney Collins (@courtneylc82) of KERA in Dallas reports that shelters are making sure they’re well-stocked.

Florida Keys residents are beginning to make the 113-mile journey on the Overseas Highway to the mainland, ahead of Hurricane Irma.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with WLRN’s Nancy Klingener (@keywestnan), who is on Key West.

President Trump overruled congressional Republicans and his own treasury secretary Wednesday and cut a deal with Democrats to fund the government and raise the federal borrowing limit for three months, all part of an agreement to speed money to Harvey relief.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the latest with NPR’s Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoNPR).

Now that school’s back in session, first-year college students are making the adjustment to campus life, which can be a big change from high school. And high school seniors who are applying to college should be thinking about who to ask for recommendation letters.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Lisa Micele (@LisaMicele), director of college counseling at the University of Illinois Laboratory High School in Urbana, Illinois, to get some advice for students.

The name “Calhoun” will be removed Tuesday from a residential building at Yale University. John C. Calhoun was a Yale graduate, U.S. vice president and a white supremacist who supported slavery. Student activists, faculty and some members of the community lobbied the administration to change the name, which they viewed as a symbol of racism.

Here & Now's Phoebe Petrovic (@phoebepetrovic) reports.

Thais Marques was marching at the base of New York’s Trump Tower Tuesday when the White House announced its plans to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA.

Marques (@thais_tweets), who was brought to the U.S. illegally from Brazil at the age of 5, has been a beneficiary of the program for more than four years. Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with her.

Hurricane season is in full swing and another powerful storm is brewing in the Atlantic. Irma, a Category 5 hurricane, is expected to make landfall in the Virgin Islands, Cuba, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico this week. Florida is also taking precautions for Irma’s blow.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Jeff Huffman (@HuffmanHeadsUp), director and chief meteorologist of the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network, about Hurricane Irma.

The United Nations Security Council held another emergency session on North Korea Monday after criticizing Pyongyang’s nuclear test over the weekend.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Abe Denmark (@AbeDenmark), director of the Asia Program at the Wilson Center and a former deputy assistant secretary of defense for East Asia.

Harvey was a 1,000-year flood event, according to a new analysis from the University of Wisconsin’s Space Science and Engineering Center. As recovery efforts continue, scientists are studying how much climate change had to do with Harvey’s record-setting rainfall and unusual path over Texas, drawing on data gathered from Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy.

Like many families in Houston, the Garcia family was forced to leave their home as floodwaters rose. They tried to save important documents, photos and some other items.

Now that the floods have receded, the Garcias have returned home to clean up and see what’s salvageable. Christopher Connelly (@hithisischris) of KERA reports.

In the wake of disasters, there are a lot of people who need help — and a lot of people who want to offer it.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Bob Ottenhoff (@BobOttenhoff), president and CEO of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, about the best ways to give after a disaster.

Beaumont, Texas, is without running water after service from the main pump station broke down due to rising waters from the Naches River. Beaumont was hit by an intense second round of rain Wednesday, which left that region underwater.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with NPR’s Debbie Elliott (@NPRDebElliott) from Beaumont.

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