Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

As we mark the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast and killed more than 1,800 people in August of 2005, Here & Now listens back to some of the memorable moments from the storm and the news coverage.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Napa Valley Wine Train is facing backlash, after members of women’s book club said they were kicked off the train over the weekend because of their race. All but one of the 11 book club members kicked off the train was African-American. The train company says the group was being too noisy. Danielle Belton of The Root discusses the story with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

What makes American music “American”? The answer depends on who you ask.

Guitarist Albert Hammond, Jr. was born in Los Angeles to two immigrants, the British-Gibraltarian musician Albert Hammond and Argentine model Claudia Fernández. When he was 18, he moved to New York City to form what would become the hugely successful band The Strokes.

A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that most U.S. middle and high schools start the school day too early, before 8:30 a.m.

Lead author Dr. Anne Wheaton says if teens don’t get enough sleep, they are more prone to not getting enough exercise and engaging in risky behavior like drinking alcohol. She cites a recommendation from the National Sleep Foundation that 14 to 17-year-olds need eight to 10 hours of sleep a night.

A pioneering mushroom scientist and a bee expert have teamed up to help fight against a disease-carrying killer of the honeybee called the varroa mite. The scientists’ weapon of choice: mushrooms. They believe a special fungus mixture they’re working on may be able to kill parasites without harming bees. Ken Christensen of Here & Now contributor EarthFix went into the field with the scientists and reports.

Faced with a shortage of primary care doctors, more and more clinics are relying on nurse practitioners to fill the gap. But that creates another gap, in the level of training providers bring to the job.

As Rowan Moore Gerety of Northwest Public Radio reports, residency programs, once reserved for physicians, are popping up for nurse practitioners as well.

Akron Loves Devo

Aug 21, 2015

A life-sized photo of the new wave band Devo was mounted over an abandoned storefront in downtown Akron, Ohio, this past week. The picture was taken in 1978, and features the band dressed in yellow hazmat suits.

This piece of public art is designed to capture the moment the band made the leap from hometown heroes to worldwide fame. From the Here & Now contributors network, David C. Barnett of WCPN brings us the story of Devo’s Rust Belt roots.

As the nation approaches the 10-year anniversary of the destruction from Hurricane Katrina, it’s worth remembering that while New Orleans felt the eye of the storm, Katrina also left 238 people dead in Mississippi, and destroyed 230,000 homes in that state.

How did the Mississippi Gulf Coast recover after such devastation, and what lingering issues still remain? Evelina Burnett of Mississippi Public Broadcasting discusses this with Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd.

Gawker, Salon, and Vice have all decided to unionize their editorial staffs this summer. Buzzfeed’s owner, however, says collective bargaining wouldn’t be right for his company.

NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about why unions are making their way into new media, and whether Jonah Peretti is right to say unions wouldn’t be good for his employees.

Des Moines Makes The List

Aug 20, 2015

It seems like every time you log onto Facebook someone has shared a link to one of those lists that rank cities in categories. “The 10 Happiest Cities for Young Professionals” or “America’s Best Cities for Barbecue.” Why are these lists so popular? And more importantly, what’s their impact? Iowa Public Radio’s Sarah Boden went in search of answers.

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