Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

75-Year-Old Figure Skater Won't Let Stroke Stop Her

Patricia competes to the song 'The Rose'. (Quick Silver Shots)

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 4:58 pm

Patricia McNamara, 75, of Orange County, Calf. started skating in her late 40s, and she’s participated in every one of the U.S. Adult Figure Skating Championships since the Adult Nationals event started in 1995.

“I feel like the best of myself is really being expressed.”

She says skating helped her recover from breast cancer, and she’s hoping it helps her fully recover from a stroke seven years ago, in which she lost some muscle control on her left side.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Australia's Kevin Rudd On U.S.-China Relations

President Obama smiles as a group of children wave flags and flowers during a welcome ceremony held by Chinese President Xi Jinping on Nov. 12, 2014. (Andy Wong/AP)

Time magazine just released its list of the 100 most influential people in the world. One of the names on the list is China’s premier Xi Jinping.

That comes as no surprise to former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, who writes in Time that Xi looks like he’s on track to pass Chairman Mao as China’s most powerful leader.

But what about beyond China? What influence does Xi have on the global stage – especially with the United States?

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

2015 Boston Marathon Preview

A worker adjusts lights on the photo bridge near the Boston Marathon finish line Thursday, April 16, 2015, on Boylston Street in Boston. The 119th Boston Marathon will be run on Monday. (Steven Senne/AP)

The 119th Boston Marathon, the world’s oldest, will be run on Monday. The 26.2-mile race starts in rural Hopkinton, Mass., and takes the runners through several other communities before finishing in downtown Boston.

That’s where two bombs exploded during the 2013 race, killing three people and injuring more than 260. The attack sparked increased security for spectators and runners that will remain in place for the second year.

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

DJ Sessions: Swing And Vintage Jazz

Artie Shaw plays the clarinet on Sept. 10, 1941. The clarinetist and bandleader's recording of "Begin the Beguine" epitomized the Big Band era. (AP)

Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson is broadcasting from Washington, D.C., and sits down with Rob Bamberger, the longtime host of “Hot Jazz Saturday Night” on WAMU in Washington. Bamberger brings us sounds from Jelly Roll Morton to Artie Shaw and His Orchestra.

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Obama Immigration Policy Up For Debate In Federal Court

The John Minor Wisdom U.S. Courthouse, home of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, New Orleans, Louisiana. (Bobak/Wikimedia Commons)

In November, President Obama announced executive actions that would allow 5 million undocumented immigrants to stay in the country and obtain work permits. Not long after, a Texas judge ordered a freeze on those actions.

Today the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in New Orleans will be hearing arguments from federal lawyers and 26 states opposing Obama’s order on whether to lift the freeze and allow his policies to move forward, or to leave the immigration policies in limbo.

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NPR Story
3:56 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing Juror Looks Back

The McVeigh jury members address the media during a news conference in Denver, Colo., Saturday, June 14, 1997. From right to left are: Roger Brown, Fred Clarke, Doug Carr, Diane Faircloth, James Osgood, Tonya Stedman, Mike Leeper, Ruth Meier, Jonathon Candelaria, Martha Hite and Vera Chubb. (Michael S. Green/AP)

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 9:03 am

Just past the two-year anniversary of the bombing of the Boston Marathon, another horrific anniversary approaches. Oklahoma City residents will never forget April 19, 1995, when a bomb blast tore through the Alfred P. Murrah federal building, killing 168 people and injuring several hundred others.

Police tracked down Timothy McVeigh, a 26-year-old Persian Gulf War veteran and right-wing militia sympathizer. He was put on trial and ultimately put to death.

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NPR Story
3:26 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Study: Many Mothers Don't Wait Long Enough Between Pregnancies

Pregnant mom. (travelingtribe/Flickr)

The typical time between pregnancies for American mothers is 2.5 years, according to new research. Doctors say that is a healthy amount of time to wait. But a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that nearly a third of women space their births too close – fewer than 18 months between pregnancies.

The study found that “while there is no consensus on optimal IPI [interpregnancy interval], research has shown that short intervals (less than 18 months) and long intervals (60 months or more) were associated with higher risks of adverse health outcomes.”

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NPR Story
3:26 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Social Media Buzz: Clinton's Logo, Ricky Gervais' Giraffe Tweet, Cheryl's Birthday

Hillary Clinton's new logo is a blue H with a red right-pointing arrow.

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 4:22 pm

Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign has a new logo that’s causing buzz. British comedian Ricky Gervais set the Internet aflutter by tweeting a photo of hunter Rebecca Francis posing beside a dead giraffe. And Singapore T.V. host Kenneth Kong posted a logic problem on Facebook about finding Cheryl’s birthday, that has gone viral.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

HBO On Trial For 'Fabricating' Child Labor Story

Host Bryant Gumbel speaks onstage during the 'Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel' panel at the HBO portion of the 2015 Winter Television Critics Association press tour at the Langham Hotel on January 8, 2015 in Pasadena, California. (Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

In a federal court this week, the British sportswear and equipment supplier Mitre Sports International is claiming HBO defamed the company in a 2008 segment of "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel" called "Children of Industry."

The segment portrayed the story of children under the age of 14 hand-sewing Mitre soccer balls for little to no money. Mitre claims that the interviews were edited to be misleading, that parts of the story were fabricated and that the children were coerced to say what they did on camera.

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NPR Story
2:52 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

'Institutional Memory' Of U.S. Senate To Retire

Don Ritchie, historian of the U.S. Senate, speaks at the 53rd annual United States Senate Youth Program on Mar. 9, 2015, in Washington, D.C. (Jakub Mosur and Erin Lubin)

On this day in 1861, a day after Fort Sumter fell, President Lincoln ordered up 75,000 troops. Within days, volunteers swarmed to Washington. It was decided that some would stay in the U.S. Senate chamber, which had only been in use for two years. Upwards of 4,000 troops took up residence, and soon the chamber was described as filthy and “alive with lice.”

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