Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

In Washington D.C., one of the places to find movers and shakers is The Bombay Club, a block from the White House. For nearly 30 years at The Bombay Club, turbaned waiters with white gloves have been serving refined Indian dishes to presidents, as well as tourists, long before Indian food became popular in the U.S.

Across the nation, hospitals are paying fines to the government when patients are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. That can cost medical centers millions and doctors are looking for ways to reduce that readmission rate.

As Casey Kuhn from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports, one rural city in Arizona has kept patients out of the hospital by sending paramedics to their homes.

When the sanctions on Iran were lifted earlier this month, as a result of the nuclear deal, we also got news that four Americans would be released from Iran, as part of a prisoner swap. Separate from that swap, another American, Matthew Trevithick, was being released.

Avoid Tax Identity Theft By Filing Early

Jan 28, 2016

Another reason to dread tax season: the Internal Revenue Service says it paid out $63 billion in fraudulent tax refunds between 2011 and 2014. That means someone posing as you could walk away with a refund check with your name on it.

Shawn Novak teaches tax policy at Arizona State University. He’s also a former tax adviser for the U.S. Senate Finance Committee. He joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd to discuss the problem, and ways to avoid becoming a victim.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is now investigating the NFL over its ticketing practices – specifically, whether it is illegally pricing tickets on the resale market using a mechanism known as “resale price floors.” Bloomberg has been covering the story, and Mike Regan of Bloomberg joins Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd with details.

Acorn TV Streams Shows From Abroad

Jan 27, 2016

After the acclaimed period drama “Downton Abbey” wraps up its final season, what new shows can Anglophiles latch onto? The Acorn TV streaming service brings beloved British programs, along with productions from Canada, Australia and New Zealand, to subscribers’ devices. NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans speaks to Here & Now's Robin Young about Acorn TV's roots and growing popularity.

Guest

Authorities say the armed group occupying the national wildlife preserve in Oregon was given “ample opportunity” to leave peacefully.

Greg Bretzing, the FBI’s Portland special agent in charge, said at a news conference Wednesday that authorities took a deliberate and measured response to those who took over Malheur National Wildlife Refuge on Jan. 2. He says they’re working to safely remove those who are still occupying the site.

With U.S. stocks off to a dismal start in 2016 and China’s economic growth slowing, Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Harvard economist Larry Summers. Summers says there’s a 1 in 3 chance the U.S. is heading for a recession. He also says he’s supporting Hillary Clinton for the presidency.

Interview Highlights: Larry Summers

Are you worried about the volatility of the stock market and the direction of the U.S. economy?

Oprah announced this week on Twitter that she lost 26 pounds – good news for her, but even better news for Weight Watchers, the program she says she used. Weight Watchers saw its stock increase by 20 percent yesterday after the announcement.

The diet company has struggled in recent years with competition from new diet apps and online services. Oprah purchased 10 percent of the company in October. Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Maggie Lake of CNN about Oprah Winfrey and her effect on the company.

Guest

At a forum in Iowa this week, an undecided young voter questioned Hillary Clinton’s honesty, while Bernie Sanders was pressed to acknowledge that he’d raise taxes to pay for his universal health care plan.

In the Republican race, Donald Trump continued to discredit Ted Cruz, while Cruz insisted he wouldn’t engage in personal attacks. Here & Now‘s political analysts take a look at the unfolding week in politics, ahead of next Monday’s caucuses in Iowa.

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