Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

Forty years ago, President Jimmy Carter awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The civil rights icon was assassinated about a decade earlier.

Sean Powers (@SeanPowersGPB) of Georgia Public Broadcasting revisits that day at the White House with an audio postcard.

Godsmack frontman, singer-songwriter Sully Erna, is known for his hard rock sound. Now, he’s out with a different kind of album.

“Hometown Life” is a mix of country, rock and blues, and the song “Different Kind of Tears” is part of an awareness campaign to fight opioid addiction. The song and accompanying video were created in partnership with the Recovery Centers of America and the Mark Wahlberg Youth Foundation.

In Gayle Forman‘s novel “Leave Me,” a heart attack prompts an overcommitted mother of twins to leave her family and start a new life.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young revisits a conversation about the book with Forman (@gayleforman) from last September.

From a stock market milestone to a low unemployment rate, there have been a number of important economic indicators to follow in the first half of 2017.

During National Lake Appreciation Month, we asked for your favorite lakes and you responded. Check out the second part in our summer series on lakes.


This summer, we’re going to spend some time cooling off with lakes. If you have some time to get away this summer, even if it’s only for the day, where should you go?

A Pakistani family is one of the last group of refugees to be resettled in the U.S., ahead of new federal guidelines restricting refugee arrivals, expected to go into effect next week.

Carmel Delshad (@cdelshad) of Here & Now contributor WAMU was at Dulles Airport in Virginia, when they arrived and has this report.

Tens of thousands have taken to the streets of Hamburg, Germany, to protest the G-20 Summit there. Meanwhile, President Trump sat down for his first face-to-face meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, as concerns about Russia’s interference in the 2016 election mount at home.

Mosquito biologist Andy Lima sometimes goes by another name. As MC Bugg-Z, he raps about mosquitoes and the illnesses they can spread. It is all part of a campaign to educate the public on disease prevention.

Jacob Fenston (@JacobFenston) of Here & Now contributor WAMU reports on the scientist/rapper who figured out that “Zika” rhymes with “mosquita.”

Circus sideshow displays of “freaks” were very popular in the United States up until the 20th century. In 1899, George and Willie Muse, the African-American children of sharecroppers, were lured from their home to become part of one such sideshow.

Francis Scott Key is most famous for writing “The Star-Spangled Banner” after the Battle of Baltimore during the War of 1812. But after he penned the now-famous lyrics, he hardly mentioned them during his life.

The Wimbledon Tennis Championships gets underway Monday. This year marks the 90th anniversary of the first radio commentary of the historic competition, which was broadcast by the BBC.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Robert Seatter, head of BBC History, about the championship and its impact on sports broadcasting over the years.

In the 1960s, the American bald eagle was nearly extinct due to the pesticide DDT and habitat destruction. DDT was banned in 1972, and the eagle population eventually came back. But now, there’s another threat to the American bald eagle: lead ammunition.

Angelica Morrison (@amorrisonWBFO) of Here & Now contributor Great Lakes Today reports.

MSNBC hosts Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough on Friday wrote a Washington Post opinion piece in response to President Trump’s tweets Thursday, saying that Brzezinski was “bleeding badly from a face-lift” when she recently visited his Florida resort Mar-a-Lago.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo declared a state of emergency Thursday for the New York City subway system, which is in serious need of repairs. The announcement comes days after a train derailment in Manhattan that injured dozens.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Michael Regan (@Reganonymous), senior editor for Bloomberg News, about the improvements needed.

The Anchorage Petroleum Wives Club has been around longer than Alaska has been a state. The club was founded in 1957 after the first big oil discovery in Alaska.

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