Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

This week, presumed Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump once again called for a temporary ban on Muslims and suggested President Obama was sympathetic to terrorists. Presumed Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton called Trump’s ideas nonsense, and called for a national assault weapons ban. Her rival Bernie Sanders, in a video message to supporters last night, didn’t concede the race and didn’t endorse Clinton.

Former Green Party candidate and consumer advocate Ralph Nader says the two-party American political system creates “second class citizens” out of third-party candidates.

He speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the flaws he saw in the Democratic primary, and says those who still blame him for Al Gore’s presidential loss in 2000 are “fact deprived.”

Interview Highlights: Ralph Nader

On which candidate he’s supporting

Millions of dollars are pouring into various funds to help the families of the victims and the survivors of the Orlando attack. Attorney Kenneth Feinberg has been in charge of several similar funds after other tragedies, including 9/11, the Virginia Tech massacre and the Boston Marathon bombings.

He’s been consulting on how to handle the Orlando situation, and talks about the situation with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

To Ellen Stofan, the chief scientist of NASA, all of the space agency’s various research initiatives from roving the craters of Mars to photographing the icy surface of Enceladus are in pursuit of one basic question: Are we alone?

Short of finding life on other planets, however, NASA scientists are advancing the fields of astrophysics, astronomy and planetary science every day. Stofan joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson for a look at scientific research at NASA.

Senate Republicans have agreed to allow votes on two potential gun control measures, following a 15-hour filibuster led by Democratic Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut.

Twenty years ago, after a mass shooting in Australia that killed 35 people, the government there enacted strict gun laws. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks to the former Deputy Prime Minister of Australia, Tim Fischer, about the challenges they faced and the lessons the U.S. government could learn.

Connecticut Democrat Chris Murphy ended a nearly 15-hour filibuster early this morning, saying Republican leaders had promised him they will hold votes on amendments to expand gun sale background checks and ban gun sales to people placed on security watch lists.

But NPR’s Sue Davis tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young that Republicans are expected to have enough votes to defeat the measures, even though polling this week shows support is growing for gun control.

Do Americans Know Enough About Science?

Jun 16, 2016

Here & Now‘s weeklong series on the state of science in America continues with a look at science literacy, and how much the general public knows about science.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Chad Orzel, associate professor at Union College, about Americans’ basic science understanding, and how much it matters.

Take the Pew Research quiz “How much do you know about science topics?”

Remembering Orlando Victim 'Top Hat Eddie'

Jun 15, 2016

Eddie Sotomayor was 34 when he died at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando on Sunday. Travel company owner Al Ferguson remembers his employee as a trailblazer in the gay travel industry, organizing the first gay cruise to Cuba this year.

Sotomayor became known in LGBT circles nationally as #tophateddie because he always wore a top hat at travel company events.

Hear more of our Orlando shooting coverage

In the aftermath of the Orlando shooting, questions remain about how Omar Mateen slipped through an FBI watch. As NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young, a grand jury is meeting to decide whether Mateen’s wife should be charged for failing to alert authorities that her husband was planning an attack.

Hear more of our Orlando shooting coverage

Newtown Parents Reflect On Orlando Attack

Jun 15, 2016

President Barack Obama will visit Orlando tomorrow to mourn the victims of Sunday’s attack on a gay nightclub that left at least 49 people dead. In December 2012, the president visited another American community to honor the dead in another mass shooting: Newtown, Connecticut.

Twenty children and six adult staff members at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown were killed by Adam Lanza on Dec. 14, 2012. Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Nicole Hockley and Mark Barden, who each lost children in the Newtown attack.

Jobs in the so-called STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and math – are growing faster than any other sector of the U.S. economy, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. But the U.S. continues to lag other countries in STEM education. Furthermore, new hires in science and tech overwhelmingly tend to be white and Asian men.

There have never been a lot of scientists in Congress, but currently there’s just one: Bill Foster, a Democrat from Illinois, who has a Ph.D. in physics. As part of a week long series about science, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Foster about science policy, funding, and why it’s important for America to be the leader in scientific innovation.

View other stories in our series, “Science In America.” 

As America wrestles to understand the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history, details of Omar Mateen’s life are beginning to emerge. NPR’s Hansi Lo Wang talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the shooter’s possible presence on gay dating apps and in gay clubs and bars.

View all our coverage on the Orlando nightclub shooting.

The Anti-Defamation League has added the Echo symbol — a series of three brackets placed before and after a Jewish name — to its database of hate speech. The symbol has emerged on social media on sites used by white supremacist and other anti-Semitic groups who aim to identify and target Jews, particularly journalists, politicians and celebrities.

President Barack Obama, during remarks at the Treasury Department, pushed back against criticism for not using the term “radical Islamic terrorism” and touched on gun control and the fight against ISIS.

Obama did not use Trump’s, but said, “”Are we going to start treating all Muslim-Americans differently? Are we going to start subjecting them to special surveillance? Are we going to start discriminating them because of their faith? We’ve heard these suggestions during the course of this campaign.”

All this week, Here & Now is speaking with scientists about their research and looking at issues such as science funding, education and innovation.

In part one, Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with France Cordova, an astrophysicist and the director of the National Science Foundation.

Interview Highlights: France Cordova

On sustainability of funding to keep the US as a scientific leader:

When you get home from work, you should be relieved and relaxed, right? Instead, a lot of people end up arguing with their partners. Experts say it’s because different people need different things after a stressful day on the job, some want to talk about what happened, others need quiet time.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Curt Nickisch of the Harvard Business Review about what the research tells us about the best way to navigate those differences.

Young boxers in Louisville, Kentucky are remembering Muhammad Ali this week. The boxing legend and humanitarian died last week at the age of 74.

Ali grew up in Louisville. And as Jake Ryan from Here & Now contributor WFPL in Louisville reports, local boxers are finding inspiration from Ali well beyond the ring.

The Supreme Court handed down several decisions today, though not in any of the three most prominent cases still pending this term. The three outstanding cases are all out of Texas: on abortion, affirmative action, and immigration.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Dahlia Lithwick, who covers the Supreme Court for Slate, about today’s decisions and what’s left at the court this term.

The New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore announced in a memo this week that it is increasing the annual salary it pays to first-year lawyers, from $160,000 to $180,000, for the first time in nea

Pages