Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

It can be tricky to determine, with any certainty, where the candidates stand on the issues, including on issues of science.

That’s why, for the second presidential election cycle in a row, Scientific American magazine has partnered with to pose 20 questions to the candidates — questions that were developed and refined by dozens of scientific organizations that represent more than 10 million scientists.

Samsung is permanently ending production of its signature Galaxy Note 7 after more reports of the smartphone catching fire.

The electronics giant previously called on carriers to stop selling the phone, but now it says it will take more drastic steps while it investigates the problem. The move leaves Samsung without a high-end model to rival Apple’s iPhone 7, and may cause headaches for millions of customers.

The 2005 video of an offensive and lewd conversation between Donald Trump and Access Hollywood’s then-host Billy Bush stirred outrage and several endorsement reversals.

It has also presented some tricky questions for NBC, which announced it is suspending Billy Bush from his current position as anchor on the “Today” show.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik about how the scandal is playing out for the media company and its staff.

U.S. employers added 156,000 jobs in September, less than expected, and unemployment rose to 5 percent, from 4.9 percent, according to today’s Labor Department report.

Jobs growth has averaged 178,000 a month so far this year, down from last year’s pace of 229,000.

But there was positive news in wages — the average hourly earnings increased 0.2 percent over August, and were up 2.6 percent over September 2015.

Hurricane Matthew lashed Haiti, leaving the country with damaged infrastructure and hundreds dead.

In addition to physical damage, the island now faces health risks, the displacement of thousands and a logistical nightmare as its people try to rebuild their lives.

The 1831 Southampton Insurrection, or Nat Turner’s Rebellion, is the subject of the new film “The Birth of a Nation.”

The film tells the story of Turner, an African-American born into slavery. He was taught to read and eventually became a preacher to fellow slaves. In August 1831 he led an uprising of slaves against their white oppressors. While some view Turner as a hero, others question his heroism because of the number of women and children who were victims of the deadly rebellion.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is calling the city council’s approval of his plan to revamp police oversight a big step forward.

The plan creates a new agency to investigate police shootings and misconduct, and includes a civilian board. This comes in the wake of outrage after the release of a video showing an officer fatally shooting African-American teenager Laquan McDonald.

Chip Mitchell of WBEZ reports.

Who Is The New U.N. Secretary-General?

Oct 6, 2016

The United Nations Security Council today approved Portugal’s former prime minister Antonio Guterres as the next U.N. secretary-general, replacing Ban Ki Moon.

Guterres served 10 years as the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, a role he believes has prepared him to serves as secretary general.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Michael Doyle, a former U.N. assistant secretary-general, about Guterres and the role he will play on the world stage.

Here is the image mentioned in the segment:


A segment that aired on “The O’Reilly Factor” this week is drawing criticism for the way it stereotyped Asian Americans.

Fox News Correspondent Jesse Watters went to Chinatown in New York City to ask people on the street their opinion of Donald Trump and China-U.S. relations. He starts out by asking two women if he is supposed to bow to say hello, and goes on to incorporate a number of other stereotypes about Asian Americans.

The Benefits Of A Good, Long Yawn

Oct 5, 2016

A new study says that the size of a yawn can be used to predict to the size of one’s brain.

Researchers at the State University of New York at Oneonta studied 19 species, including humans, and found yawning to be a stimulant for brain growth.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson is joined by Sharon Begley, senior science writer for STAT news, for more on the study.

Looking for a new piece of art to display in your home? You could visit a local gallery. Or you could do what lots of galleries are doing these days: check out Instagram.

Hady Mawajdeh of KERA in Dallas takes a look at how the photo sharing app is seriously expanding the art world.

Supporters of Donald Trump have been defending the Republican presidential nominee, saying that Trump’s business genius was revealed by a New York Times story this weekend that found that Trump may have avoided paying federal income taxes for 18 years.

Journalist and author David Cay Johnston joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss his reporting today, which took a closer look at Trump’s taxes.

Uber is expanding its food delivery service, UberEats, planning to expand to at least 22 more countries in the next few months.

The delivery service launched in London and a few U.S. cities in the spring and summer, and this week began operating in Amsterdam, Dubai, Johannesburg and Tokyo. UberEats plans to be up and running in Stockholm, Jakarta, Bangkok and other cities within months.

Ash Vs. Evil Dead,” the television spin-off of the cult classic 1980s films, makes its return to Starz for season two on Sunday.

Bruce Campbell plays Ash Williams, a comical-yet-flawed character who returns to his hometown to fight evil. The series includes violent scenes that have no shortage of blood and gore for viewers, but how far is too far?

NPR’s Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the series’s return.

The United States owes African Americans reparations for its history of “racial terrorism,” according to a new report from a United Nations working group based in Geneva.

The team was invited by the U.S. government to conduct a fact-finding mission that explored the many ways in which racial discrimination has taken form, including police violence, mass incarceration and housing segregation; it also looks back in detail at slavery and the brutal practice of lynching.

The newest Doritos have little flavor, no flashy color, minimal crunch and dull gray packaging. The kind of snack, essentially, that no one would choose.

And that, according to executives at Frito-Lay, is exactly the point.

The new chips are part of a campaign with Rock the Vote to boost voter registration among college students. Special vending machines placed on college campuses will be asking snackers whether they’ve registered to vote.

This summer one of the largest birds in North America suddenly showed up in Washington state’s Puget Sound.

Squadrons of white pelicans have set area birders atwitter. They’re trying to figure out where the birds came from and what their arrival means.

While this rare sighting has been fun for bird watchers, Katie Campbell from Here & Now contributor Earthfix reports on why it may not be a good thing for the pelicans.

John and Heidi Small were told that it was a bad idea to start an all-’80s radio station.

But six years ago, the husband-wife team went ahead with their plan.

They run Sunny Radio in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and they speak with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about some of their favorite songs.

For more than a century, the designers of tall buildings have used mostly concrete and steel. But advances in structural engineering have sparked new interest among architects in one of the world’s oldest building materials: wood.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michael Green, a Vancouver-based architect who says wood is just as strong as concrete or steel — and more sustainable.

Robert Finley is not your average new artist.

At 63, the north Louisiana blues and soul musician has already lived a lifetime. He served as a helicopter serviceman in the Army in the ’70s and worked as a carpenter for decades until he started to lose his sight a few years ago.

Unable to continue working, Finley fell back on his dream: singing and playing guitar.