Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

Gish Jen has tapped her Chinese roots while writing novels like 1991’s “Typical American.” More recently she’s turned her attention to non-fiction explorations of cultural issues.

Arkansas lawmakers are considering a bill to ban books in public schools that were written by historian Howard Zinn.

The best-selling author is known for “A People’s History of the United States,” which was first published in 1980. Zinn’s critics call him a radical liberal.

Adam Kirby teaches social studies at Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas and uses Zinn’s lessons in his classroom. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Kirby about the need to defend the author’s work.

Bruce Cannon Gibney writes that for decades the United States has been run by people who are deceitful, selfish, imprudent, remorseless and hostile — the baby boomers, a generation that Gibney defines as being born between 1940 and 1964.

There are two new reports out Tuesday on race and wrongful convictions that show there were a record number of exonerations in 2016. They also found that innocent African Americans were more likely to be wrongfully convicted than whites, and that they spend more time in prison before exoneration than whites do.

WikiLeaks is releasing a new trove of classified materials. The group says the 8,000 leaked documents come from the Central Intelligence Agency and reveal information about the CIA’s computer hacking capabilities.

U.S. Steps Up Military Campaign In Yemen

Mar 6, 2017

Yemeni officials say al-Qaida militants killed at least 11 soldiers in their most recent attacks on government forces.

The U.S. has stepped up its air-strike campaign in Yemen in recent days as part of a sustained attack on al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula. An American ground raid there in late January targeted AQAP and resulted in the death of a Navy SEAL, along with militants and civilians.

Erik Weihenmayer in 2001 became the first blind person to reach the summit of Mount Everest. But he didn’t rest on his laurels.

He’s climbed all seven of the world’s tallest mountains, kayaked the Grand Canyon and started the organization No Barriers to help others overcome physical and mental challenges.

Are American Suburbs Dying?

Mar 6, 2017

Business Insider makes the argument in a series this week that American suburbs as we know them are dying. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with the project’s editor, Ashley Lutz (@AshleyLutz).

Flocks of birds or schools of fish often group together in massive numbers, and move as though they are a single organism with one brain.

The behavior is called a murmuration, and scientists are trying to figure out how — and why — the animals do it.

Politico’s Alex Isenstadt published an article on Sunday that detailed how White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer was checking his staffers’ phones to find out who was leaking information to the press. According to The Washington Post, Spicer tried to get back at Isenstadt by spreading a rumor that the reporter had laughed at the death of a Navy SEAL.

Singers Rickie Lee Jones (@RickieLeeJones) and Madeleine Peyroux (@mpeyrouxmusic) have individually built up devoted followings over the years. Jones has won two Grammy awards, and Peyroux’s voice has drawn comparisons to Billie Holiday.

How To Eat Your Way Through Mardis Gras

Feb 28, 2017

Thousands of revelers are taking to the streets in New Orleans on Tuesday to celebrate the last day before the Catholic and Protestant Lenten season begins.

Music will fill the streets of the French Quarter, but the most important question is, what are folks eating?

Tourism in Chicago was up last year, thanks in large part to the Chicago Cubs’ historic World Series win and a robust conference industry. But tourism officials are concerned the trend may not continue if the city fails to stop the violence that’s captured headlines around the world.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Danny Ecker (@DannyEcker), reporter at Crain’s Chicago Business covering tourism.

President Trump speaks to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night, where he’s expected to touch on his administration’s health care and tax plans. Political observers also expect him to make the case for his upcoming budget, which will ask for a significant increase in defense spending.

Warm water off the West Coast has upset the balance of Northern California’s marine ecosystem. The ocean’s kelp forests from the Bay Area to Oregon have shrunk by more than 90 percent since 2008.

In 1939, Nazi Germany started World War II and Adolf Hitler’s highly mechanized army began gobbling up territory across Europe.

As Hitler set his eyes on sacking Great Britain, Prime Minister Winston Churchill knew there was no chance of defeating him by conventional means. So Churchill created a top-secret organization devoted to sabotage and guerrilla warfare.

Sixty-seven-year-old William Forsythe doesn’t look like a ballet superstar — he’s slightly built and he wears glasses. But the former dancer is completely at home in Boston Ballet’s rehearsal studio, wearing socks as he shows the dancers how to move.

He is known for deconstructing a dance tradition that goes back five centuries. There are times when he gets very theoretical about it. Describing ballet movements, he’ll say, “You have to vector it into space with very differentiated dynamics.” Other times he sounds very down to earth, saying, “It’s theater, we’re in show biz!”

There are reports Thursday of heavy fighting between Iraqi forces and ISIS, which still controls the western section of Mosul. The fight has centered around the city’s airport.

What Makes An Effective Protest Movement?

Feb 23, 2017

President Trump’s policies on immigration, refugees and more have prompted millions of people to take to the streets. Many of them are first-time protesters.

They were unlikely settlers of America’s heartland: children, shipped from New York orphanages to small towns in the Midwest at the turn of the 20th century. And the little town of Concordia, Kansas, is making sure they’re not forgotten.

C.J. Janovy from Here & Now contributor KCUR has our story.

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