Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

19 Manatees Rescued From Storm Drain In Florida

Early this morning, 19 manatees were rescued from a drain pipe in Satellite Beach, Florida, south of Cape Canaveral. Florida has been experiencing colder than average temperatures, and the endangered animals were probably seeking warmer waters in the drainpipe.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Tue February 24, 2015

Uber's New Turf: Mid-Sized Cities

Des Moines, Iowa, is one of the mid-sized cities where Uber is expanding. (Ron Reiring/Wikimedia Commons)

The car-for-hire service Uber has been elbowing its way into big cities across the country, sparking controversies with taxis and regulators.

Last month, the San Francisco-based company raised $1.6 billion in financing, which it is using to fund international expansion.

Closer to home, the company is setting its sights on mid-sized cities, looking to expand its market into areas where taxi service is not as much a part of the culture.

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NPR Story
2:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Oversight Of Home Caregivers Said To Be Lacking

Toni Giusto keeps a box within reach filled with the pens, paper and letters to keep her busy. (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

With the aging of the U.S. population, more elderly and disabled people than ever are receiving care in their own homes.

In California, the state pays for relatives and other caregivers for low-income residents. The program has a $7 billion budget and serves nearly half a million people.

But there’s concern that there’s not enough oversight to keep people safe. Anna Gorman of Kaiser Health News has the story.

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NPR Story
2:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

Redesigning Houston's METRO System Without Breaking The Bank

Maps of the existing Houston transit system (left) and the new plan (right). (transitsystemreimagining.com)

While parts of the nation saw serious failures in public transit in the last few weeks, Houston was busy approving a new transit project that would overhaul the entire METRO bus network without increasing operating costs.

The plan seeks to broaden the system, allowing riders to get to most areas of the city without relying on infrequent buses. But that comes with a trade-off: by cutting low-rider routes, some may be left without public transportation.

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NPR Story
2:42 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

White House Pushes For Tougher Rules On Retirement Funds

Today, the Obama administration is expected to show its support of a Department of Labor proposal about Americans’ retirement savings.

The measure would require brokers to act in their client’s best interest, meaning that it would be harder for them to push people towards high-fee products and funds, but industry officials say it’s unnecessary and could be bad for investors.

Jill Schlesinger of CBS News joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the proposal and its implications.

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NPR Story
4:25 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

Greece And Eurozone Creditors Reach Deal, Official Says

Greece and its European creditors have reached a deal over the country’s request to extend its bailout.

An official close to discussions, who spoke only on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to comment publicly, says a deal was reached between the two sides at Friday’s meeting of finance ministers in Brussels.

The official said that, as part of the agreement, Greece could “present a first list of reform measures by Monday” for the country’s debt inspectors to assess.

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NPR Story
4:25 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

A Mother's Battle Against Medical Errors

Alyssa Hemmelgarn reading a book. Alyssa died shortly after being diagnosed with leukemia. (Courtesy of Hemmelgarn family)

Hundreds of thousands of people in the U.S. die from medical errors every year. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States.

Carole Hemmelgarn is on a mission to help medical professionals avoid errors. She says the healthcare system failed her family and her daughter.

“I had a 9-year-old daughter, named Alyssa, and she was diagnosed with leukemia on a Monday and she died 10 days later,” said Hemmelgarn.

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NPR Story
4:25 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

Home Sick? Try These Recipes

Kathy Gunst's avgolemono soup (Greek-style chicken-lemon-orzo soup) with Meyer lemon and dill is a delicious, soothing and healing winter soup. (Kathy Gunst)

What do you like to eat when you’re sick? Chicken soup? The comfort foods you grew up with? Something hot and spicy? Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst brings in some of her ideas, including her ginger tea, Greek lemon soup and her own chicken soup recipe.

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NPR Story
2:49 pm
Thu February 19, 2015

Trillions Of Dollars In Household Debt Dragging Americans Down

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:18 pm

Household debt is on the rise again. Economists at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York have released a new report showing our debts – including mortgages, credit cards, car loans and student loans – have been shooting up, even though the economy has been improving.

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NPR Story
2:35 pm
Thu February 19, 2015

Steve Inskeep's Reporter’s Notebook: The Opening Up Of Iran

On the anniversary of Iran’s 1979 revolution, young women pass by a banner proclaiming, “America Owes Humanity.” (Steve Inskeep and Molly Messick via NPR's On The Road Tumblr)

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is recently back from Iran, where he visited three different cities and interviewed dozens of people in a matter of days.

He arrived amid celebrations marking the anniversary of the Iranian revolution, marked with clear anti-American sentiment. But as Iran, the U.S. and other countries continue to negotiate a possible nuclear deal, Inskeep met many people there who are open to changing the strained relationship with the United States.

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