Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is expected in Islip, New York, on Friday, where he’ll meet with Suffolk County law enforcement about a recent spate of brutal murders by the MS-13 gang.

The gang also made headlines earlier this month when President Trump tweeted that “weak” Obama-era policies allowed MS-13 to flourish, and that his proposed border wall would prevent gang members from entering the country:

When Southeast Asians fled to the United States in the 1970s and ’80s as refugees of the Vietnam War, Americans were just as divided about whether to accept them as they are now about welcoming refugees from Syria and other countries.

Back then, the federal government made the unpopular choice to double down on the number of people it would take in, and created a formal resettlement system.

President Trump is almost through his first 100 days in office. That largely symbolic marker comes on Saturday. And while he’s hit some roadblocks when it comes to high-profile issues like immigration and health care, Trump has taken aggressive steps toward fulfilling campaign promises he made on energy and the environment.

Congress is nearing an agreement on a $1 trillion spending bill to keep the government running, now that President Trump has apparently backed off his threat to cancel subsidies for low-income people to buy health insurance.

Members of the House Freedom Caucus on Wednesday approved a more conservative version of the American Health Care Act, but the bill still needs support from more moderate Republicans if it’s going to replace the Affordable Care Act.

The oil giant BP opened a gas station in the outskirts of Mexico City in March.

On the surface it doesn’t sound like much. But it also happens to be the first global retail brand to operate a fueling station in Mexico since the country began loosening restrictive energy policies that date back to the 1930s.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd takes a closer look at where the new station fits in the Mexican government’s efforts to open the country’s energy market.

President Trump proposed dramatic cuts in corporate and personal taxes Wednesday in an overhaul his administration asserts will spur national economic growth and bring jobs and prosperity to America’s middle class. But his ambitious plan is alarming lawmakers who worry it will balloon federal deficits.

NPR economics correspondent John Ydstie (@jey51) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to go over the details.

About 1 million Americans live in Mexico, and many of them do so illegally. But it’s much easier to navigate life in Mexico as an immigrant without proper documents than it is in the United States.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson explores this with two people who have firsthand experience with the differences.

Editor’s Note: Here & Now agreed not to use our guests’ last names for this conversation.

Interview Highlights

On Eddie’s immigration story and the limitations of his status

In a series of full-page newspaper advertisements in The New York Times, The Washington Post and The San Francisco Chronicle, Silicon Valley investor Doug Derwin published an open letter calling on Elon Musk to sever ties with the Trump administration.

Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla, sits on the White House Strategic and Policy Forum and has responded to critics before, saying that to leave the board over political differences “would be wrong.”

When kids don’t brush their teeth, they risk more than just cavities. Experts say tooth decay can affect a child’s diet, their ability to concentrate and do well in school and their self-esteem.

Overall, children’s oral health is getting better. But poor kids aren’t improving as much. Take San Francisco’s Chinatown, a neighborhood with the highest rate of childhood tooth decay in the city.

Grant Sabatier was a college graduate, living with his parents, too broke to buy a burrito, when he decided that he was going to make $1 million by age 30. He says the first thing he needed to do was change his mindset to one of saving — which he refers to as “paying yourself first.”

He’s now a successful blogger and digital strategist who offers six steps to wealth, which include side jobs, stock market investment, lifestyle changes and daily saving goals.

The political battle over Georgia’s 6th District could become the most expensive House race in history.

Last week, Democrat Jon Ossoff just missed an outright win in a special election to replace now-Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price. He faces Republican Karen Handel in a June 20 runoff that’s drawn the money and attention of both national parties, and has been called an electoral test for President Trump.

Overnight masked workers guarded by snipers removed a prominent Confederate monument in the city of New Orleans, in a controversial move that Mayor Mitch Landrieu said Monday morning was “not about taking something away from someone else.”

Longtime New Orleans journalist Tim Morris (@tmorris504) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss the fallout.

Where does a foodie find food on the road? Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst drove from coast to coast on her way back to her home in New England, and discovered lots of great restaurants along the way. She shares some of her finds with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson. You can also check out Kathy’s Instagram for more photos from the trip.

A Brutal Crackdown On Gay Men In Chechnya

Apr 21, 2017

Chechen officials are carrying out a campaign of violence against gay men. Those who’ve escaped say they were beaten and tortured by authorities, and forced to reveal the names of their gay friends. Police and government officials have also encouraged so-called “honor killings” by outing gay men to their families.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Rachel Denber (@Rachel_Denber) of Human Rights Watch about the violence.

A new study has found an association between frequent drinking of diet sodas and an increased risk of both stroke and dementia.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Dr. Matthew Pase, the study’s lead author and a neurologist at the Boston University School of Medicine, about what it means for the average soda drinker.

Interview Highlights

On the study’s findings

Tennis great Serena Williams announced Wednesday that she’s 20 weeks pregnant, which means that she was expecting her first child when she won the Australian Open in January. That made us wonder: How much exercise is safe during pregnancy?

A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association concluded that exercising, in most cases, is good for mothers and their babies. But that also leaves some women questioning whether there’s such a thing as too much.

Today is 4/20, the unofficial holiday for marijuana enthusiasts. So, it’s fitting that a new church that’s all about pot opens in Denver today.

On Sunday the first round of voting will be held in France’s presidential elections. With 10 percent unemployment and one of the slowest growth rates in the European Union, the country’s flagging economy has been an issue during the campaign.

CNN’s Maggie Lake (@maggielake) speaks with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about the state of the French economy.

Aaron Hernandez died by suicide Wednesday, less than a week after a jury cleared him of committing a double murder in 2012.

The former New England Patriots tight end was already serving a sentence of life without parole for another murder in 2013. Massachusetts state police have launched an investigation into Hernandez’s death, which authorities say occurred early Wednesday at the Souza-Baranowski Correctional Center in Shirley, Massachusetts.

A shooting rampage in Fresno, California, that lasted just a few minutes on Tuesday has killed three people. Officials say the suspect, Kori Ali Muhammad, might have been racially motivated. He reportedly posted comments on social media expressing hatred toward white people.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Jeffrey Hess, reporter for Valley Public Radio, to get the latest.

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