Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

Police say they are unsure about the location of a shooter in an attack near a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs that left three officers injured.

A witness says she heard as many as 20 shots in less than five minutes and saw an officer fall to the ground Friday during the shooting.

Denise Speller, manager of a nearby haircut salon, told The Gazette of Colorado Springs that she saw another officer kneel down to render aid to the officer who fell.

Books To Give As Gifts This Year

Nov 27, 2015

If you’re looking to give a book to a friend or family member this holiday, check out these recommendations from NPR Books editor Petra Mayer.

This year marks the centennial of the last log drives on the Connecticut River. From the late 1800s to the early 1900s, logs up to 30 feet long were floated 300 miles downriver to sawmills in Massachusetts and Connecticut to build the cities of 19th century New England.

Jon Kalish brought Here & Now this story about two Vermonters who are keeping the history alive by chronicling the history of the drives.

Friendship is unlike any other relationship in a person’s life. It can be difficult to define and may carry different meanings for different people. Two friends may describe the degree of their relationship in totally different ways.

While family bonds are typically considered unconditional, friendships are voluntary and thus subject to being set aside when people enter adulthood and “more important” events arise.

Here & Now’ Robin Young and her now-late uncle, Lachlan Maclachlan Field, take a trip to see the migrating snow geese in Vermont. Revisiting their pilgrimage has become a Thanksgiving tradition at Here & Now.

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Qirat Chappra, a terminally ill 18-year-old who has spent most of her life at a children’s hospital in Houston, will be granted what she calls her dying wish.

Chappra has not seen her parents, who live in Pakistan, for 13 years. They have been repeatedly denied travel visas, but after a social media campaign and some help from a congressman, their visas have been approved. The parents could be in the United States as early as next week.

National security analyst and author John Walcott argues that the conversation about how to fight ISIS – with more surveillance, restrictions on refugees and more military action – is all wrong. He speaks with Here & Now’s Indira Lakshmanan about the critical missing piece of the campaign against ISIS: human intelligence.

Lynn Fisher and Nick Crohn, two web designers from the Phoenix area, love airport codes. They launched the website in March that links hundreds of those three-letter codes with a pretty picture and a brief story about the airport – enough to keep you busy while you’re waiting in line at one of those airports this week.

This story originally aired on April 1, 2015.

When Seattle public radio news station KUOW announced recently that it would purchase Seattle’s other major public radio station KPLU, it was met with shock and anger by members of the KPLU advisory board. The board subsequently voted unanimously to oppose the sale of the radio station.

KUOW has said that it would change the format of KPLU from news and music to jazz and blues. NPR’s David Folkenflik tells Here & Now’s Indira Lakshmanan about the broadcast landscape behind the proposed merger.

There’s a long history of people chaining themselves to trees or posts or buildings – or to each other – to protest some injustice or simply to get their voices heard. But up in New Hampshire, they may have a first.

Early in November, Kevin Dumont, the owner of Liquid Planet Water Park in Candia, New Hampshire climbed to the top of his water slide tower and chained himself to the rail. His goal: To save the park from a planned December 2nd auction.