Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

President Barack Obama made history this week by becoming the first U.S. president to cross the invisible line into the Arctic Circle while in office. He used the trip to draw attention to global warming trends that are melting ice in the Arctic Ocean.

Scientists predict the body of water will be ice-free for much of the summer, as early as 2030. That calls into question who has access to what in an increasingly accessible part of the world.

How much are you working when you’re at work? That’s the question increasingly on the minds of employers, especially ones in Silicon Valley.

The New York Times exposé on Amazon painted a portrait – one that Amazon refutes – of a harsh workplace where employees are measured by algorithms and anonymous peer reviews.

New Zealand is holding a public competition to possibly replace the country’s current flag. Over 10,000 designs were submitted and yesterday, four designs were revealed as finalists.

New Zealand residents will vote on a winner later this year and then in March 2016, they will vote on whether that winner will replace the current New Zealand flag.

Lawyers representing thousands of inmates who have been held in small, windowless rooms say they’ve reached a settlement with the state of California to end the practice of extreme long-term isolation. Michael Montgomery talks with Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins about the history of solitary confinement in California and what is going to change.

Flying presents a particular set of challenges for people with allergies to peanuts and tree nuts. Even touching an armrest with residue on it can cause someone with an allergy to go into anaphylactic shock, where the airway closes and the person is unable to breathe.

People who use Google’s internet browser Chrome could soon see fewer of those ads that pop up or start playing automatically. Starting today, Chrome will block online ads that use Adobe Flash. Flash is the technology behind many of the online video and banner ads that pop up or start playing on their own.

Now the ads will be defaulted to pause on Chrone, so users will have to elect to watch them. Jason Bellini of The Wall Street Journal joins Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins to take a look at what this means for Adobe Flash and for online advertising.

As part of a series of listening sessions across the country, representatives from the Bureau of Land Management recently came to Gillette, Wyoming, to meet with residents about the agency’s federal coal program.

The BLM says it wants to modernize the program to ensure American taxpayers receive a fair return on mining on federal lands. A reformed program will be an additional blow to the coal industry, already struggling with declining production and restrictive regulations.

Daniel James Brown‘s book about the University of Washington’s eight-oar rowing team, “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” was a bestseller for months when it was published in 2013.

The U.S. open gets underway today, and there’s a buzz in the air as Serena Williams tries to complete her first Grand Slam – winning all four major tennis competitions in one season.

For what is believed to be the first time in history, tickets for the women’s final sold out before tickets for the men’s final. Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins speaks with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News for a look at the U.S. Open and women’s tennis through a business lens.

Gyms and personal trainers across the country are watching new regulations coming from the Board of Physical Therapy in Washington, D.C. The board is preparing new guidelines that would make a registry of personal trainers and place further requirements on the industry.

Gyms fear Washington will be a testing ground for other states. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Phillip Godfrey, a medical exercise specialist in Washington, D.C. who opposes the regulations.

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