Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

As presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump get ready for their first debate Monday night, Here & Now looks at some of the highlights in the history of presidential debates.

The first Clinton-Trump debate falls on the anniversary of the first-ever televised presidential debate, between Republican Richard Nixon and Democrat John F. Kennedy, on Sept. 26, 1960.

There’s just over a week left in Major League Baseball’s regular season. But only one team — the Chicago Cubs — has clinched a playoff berth.

That means the race for the postseason, both division winners and wild card hopefuls, is reaching a crescendo.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca about how the end of the season is shaping up.

A sculpture with a secret message at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, has stumped amateur code breakers for a quarter-century.

Elonka Dunin, a software developer from Nashville, Tennessee, has spent the better part of two decades trying to unravel the mystery of Kryptos.

Tony Youngblood from Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio has her story.

How One Syrian Family Found A Home In Texas

Sep 21, 2016

Bassam Al Abbas does not like to think about the civil war raging in his home country of Syria.

The conflict, which produced nearly 5 million refugees and internally displaced millions more, also drove him and his family from their homes in 2012. For years they navigated foreign languages and vetting systems before eventually settling in Austin, Texas, in May.

“I cannot describe how much they welcomed me,” Al Abbas told Here & Now. “They made us love this country.”

The Washington Post reported Tuesday that Donald Trump spent more than $250,000 from his charitable foundation to settle lawsuits involving his businesses.

When the new National Museum of African American History and Culture opens this weekend in Washington, D.C., one of the exhibits will be a collection of photographs from the late 1930s to the 1940s, taken by a young African-American woman named Laura Fitzpatrick.

As NPR’s Elizabeth Blair reports, Fitzpatrick chose to capture images of life at its best.

A law enforcement official says the Afghan immigrant wanted in connection with explosions in New York City and New Jersey has been taken into custody following a shootout with police officers.

The official says two officers were shot in the encounter in Linden, New Jersey.

Authorities were looking for Ahmad Khan Rahami, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Afghanistan with an address in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti gets the latest from NPR’s Hansi Lo Wang.

Guest

Historically, the working poor in America had very little leisure time while the upper class had plenty. Now, the opposite is true, at least for working class men.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic about the surprising statistics, what working class men do with their leisure time and what might be the reasons behind their behavior.

In the past few days, authorities in New York, Minnesota and New Jersey have been seeking answers in a series of incidents that are raising questions about homegrown extremism.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti takes a closer look at each event with security expert Seth Jones of RAND Corporation.

The Chinese and Russian navies are conducting military exercises in the South China Sea, which has been the subject of territorial disputes between China and its Southeast Asian neighbors.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Stephen Nagy of the International Christian University of Tokyo about whether they are risking a provocation.

Interview Highlights: Stephen Nagy

On what the exercises are about

Health experts have warned about the growing risks people face as bacteria increasingly become resistant to antibiotics.

A team led by Professor Roy Kishony of Harvard Medical School and Technion Israel Institute of Technology found a way to show just how quickly bacteria can evolve to be resistant, and their video has gone viral.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with postdoctoral fellow Michael Baym about how he made the video, and what the team hopes to accomplish with its research.

Award-winning shows like “Game of Thrones” and “Veep” will be well represented at Sunday’s Emmy Awards, but some new names may collect statuettes.

“The Americans’” Keri Russell is looking for her first Emmy, as is veteran actor Courtney B. Vance, who gave a strong performance as Johnny Cochran in “American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson.” ABC’s “Black-ish” may also finally get recognized as a top comedy this year, though in an election year, Emmy voters may continue to award another solid season of “Veep.”

The top four Paralympic runners competing in the 1,500-meter final on Sunday beat the final time posted by Olympic gold medalist Matt Centrowitz Jr. at the Rio Games less than a month ago. The visually impaired runners did not use assisted technologies or guides.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Erin Strout of Runner’s World magazine about the record-breaking runners, and other standout Paralympic performances.

Managers have many reasons to say “no” to employees, but it can be difficult to work for someone who always says “no” to new ideas.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with author and employee engagement expert David Sturt about why saying “yes” more often might be better for business.

Don’t trust the polls. Trust the average. That’s the general advice from most pollsters or politicos when reading presidential predictions.

But even so, not all polls are created equal.

Results differ based on who is being selected for a poll, whether it is a national or state poll, the number of candidates on the ballot and how close the poll is to the election.

What Does The Electoral College Do?

Sep 13, 2016

Voters go to the polls on Nov. 8. But the 538 members of the Electoral College vote on Dec. 19.

They’re supposed to follow the popular vote, but there’s always a chance a few might not. And what happens if Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are tied?

Political scientist Kyle Dell joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young for a refresher on the Electoral College, and how members of Congress might break a potential tie.

Interview Highlights: Kyle Dell

On the Electoral College’s function

The world’s wilderness areas have experienced catastrophic losses in the past two decades, according to a new study published Friday in the journal “Current Biology.”

Comparing current maps with those from the 1990s, researchers concluded that more than 3.3 million square kilometers, or about one-tenth of the world’s total wilderness, has been lost, raising deep concerns about what effect that has on local economies and global climate change.

Stock markets in the U.S. were steady this morning, after closing at their lowest level since July on Friday.

The drop came after comments from Eric Rosengren, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston president, raising the expectations for a rate hike from the Federal Reserve later this year.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Jill Schlesinger about what is rattling investors.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Femi Oke of Al Jazeera English about some of the stories that are gathering steam on social media.

Jury selection began this week in the federal trial of two former top aides to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who are said to have orchestrated the traffic jam at the George Washington Bridge in 2013 known as “Bridgegate.”

Bridget Anne Kelly, Christie’s former deputy chief of staff, and Bill Baroni, a Christie appointee to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, are charged with fraud and conspiracy for allegedly planning the lane closures as an act of retribution against Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich, for not endorsing Christie’s bid for re-election.

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