Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

Last Friday the Supreme Court made a landmark decision for gay rights. But another institution has also played a significant role in changing American public opinion about this issue: Hollywood.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans talks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about the “Modern Family effect” and how television has changed the way Americans think about gay relationships.

DJ Session: Sounds For The Holiday Weekend

6 hours ago

For the upcoming holiday weekend, this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions features KCRW’s Anthony Valadez, with new music from the artist Bilal, a trained opera singer who has now gone in a very different direction. He also shares songs from U.K. artist LA Priest, Canadian singer and musician Mocky and Argentine DJ/producer Chancha Via Circuito.

Confederate flags are coming down across the South as governments and institutions respond to calls to remove symbols of a racist past. At the University of Texas at Austin, thousands of students have petitioned the school to remove a statue of Jefferson Davis, who was president of the Confederate States of America during the Civil War.

Facebook is millennials’ No. 1 source for political news, according to a recent study by Pew Research Center. Now, other social media outlets are trying to get on board.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with media analyst John Carroll about social networks’ stampede to become news outlets and get journalists on staff.

The Supreme Court’s recent ruling on same-sex marriage is a striking reminder of the strides LGBT Americans have made toward acceptance in recent years.

But it wasn’t very long ago that the broader society treated them with scorn. That’s clear from a 1961 television documentary called “The Rejected.” It was one of the first to openly address sexual orientation, and was considered progressive at the time.

After the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage, couples in states around the country rushed to courthouses to get marriage licenses. Many states that had been hold-outs, including Michigan, shifted policies very quickly.

But in some places in the South, including counties in Alabama, clerks are pushing back. One clerk in Arkansas has reportedly quit in opposition. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR reporter Debbie Elliott about the trend.

On July 15, NASA’s unmanned spacecraft New Horizons is expected to encounter its primary target of Pluto. It’s a project nine years in the making, and with 3 billion miles recorded, it is the longest, farthest and fastest-ever space mission.

“Time flies when you’re having fun,” Alan Stern, who leads the mission, told Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson. “We’ve crossed the entirety of the solar system and now we’re on Pluto’s doorstep.”

Obama To Expand Overtime Pay For Millions

Jun 30, 2015

President Obama announced this week that the Labor Department will expand overtime pay, in a move the administration estimates would impact 5 million U.S. workers. That would double the income threshold at which employers can avoid paying overtime.

Right now, only salaried employees earning less $23,660 a year are eligible for overtime. This rule would raise that threshold so that employees making up to $50,660 a year would get paid overtime.

Its been a busy week for the Supreme Court. Not surprisingly, that means it has been a busy week for linguists. Consider that in the last few days we’ve heard Justice Antonin Scalia use both jiggery-pokery and mummeries.

A new chorus in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is helping transgender men and women find their voices – and community. The Butterfly Music Transgender Chorus was founded by Sandi Hammond, a singer and vocal teacher, who wanted to help trans men and women learn to use their changing voices in a safe space.

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