Here & Now

Weekdays at 1pm (WMRA)
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now is public radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after Morning Edition and before All Things Considered.

Host Robin Young
Credit Kalman Zabarsky/Boston University Photography

Robin Young

Robin Young is the award-winning host of Here & Now, produced by WBUR in Boston. Under her leadership, Here & Now has established itself as public radio's indispensable midday news magazine: hard-hitting, up-to-the-moment and always culturally relevant.

A Peabody Award winning documentary filmmaker, Robin has been a correspondent for ABC, NBC, CBS and the Discovery Channel. She is a former guest host of The Today Show on NBC, and one of the first hosts on Boston's ground-breaking television show, Evening Magazine.

Robin has received five Emmy Awards for her television work, as well as two CableACE Awards, the Religious Public Relations Council's Wilbur Award, the National Conference of Christians and Jews Gold Award, and numerous regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

A native of Long Island, Robin holds a bachelor's degree from Ithaca College. She has lived and worked in Manhattan, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, but considers Boston her hub. Follow Robin on Twitter, @hereandnowrobin and like the show, Here & Now on Facebook.

Co-host Jeremy Hobson
Credit Kalman Zabarsky for Boston University Photography

Jeremy Hobson

Jeremy Hobson joins Robin Young in July 2013 as co-host of Here & Now, public radio's indispensable midday news magazine, produced by NPR and WBUR.

Jeremy was formerly host of American Public Media's (APM) Marketplace Morning Report, an eight-minute daily business news program with an audience of more than six million. He started at Marketplace in 2007 as a reporter based in Washington, D.C. and covered Wall Street and its impact on ordinary Americans during the 2008 financial collapse.

Prior to his time at APM, Jeremy worked as a reporter and producer at NPR on shows ranging from All Things Considered, Day to Day and Wait Wait…Don't Tell Me! He has also worked as a host and reporter for public radio stations including WBUR (Boston), WILL (Urbana), WCAI (Cape Cod) and WRNI (Providence).

Jeremy's radio career began at age nine when he started contributing to a program called Treehouse Radio. He's a graduate of Boston University and the University of Illinois Laboratory High School. Follow Jeremy on Twitter, @jeremyhobson and @hereandnow - and like Here & Now on Facebook.

Substitute host Meghna Chakrabarti
Credit Lucy Cobos

Meghna Chakrabarti

Meghna Chakrabarti is the co-host of Radio Boston, WBUR's acclaimed weekday show with a focus both on the news of the day, and on broader issues that have an impact on Boston and beyond.

Before joining Radio Boston in 2010, she reported on New England transportation and energy issues for WBUR's news department. She also produced and directed WBUR's national news and talk program, On Point, for five years and served as fill-in host for Here & Now, WBUR's national midday show.

Meghna has won awards from both the Associated Press and the Radio Television News Directors Association for her writing, hard news reporting, and use of sound. On Radio Boston, her interviews have encompassed a wide range: Secretary of State John Kerry and law professor Anita Hill, actor F. Murray Abraham and pianist Lang Lang, language expert Steven Pinker and author Lois Lowry, comedians Mindy Kaling and Rachel Dratch, public radio favorites David Isay and the late David Rakoff, and many more.

A former fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Environmental Reporting, Meghna holds bachelor's degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Oregon State University, as well as a master's degree from Harvard University. She is currently completing work toward an MBA at Boston University.

A Guide To Herbs For Your Garden And Table

15 minutes ago

Now that it’s spring, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst says herbs are a must-have for would-be gardeners and cooks. With host Robin Young, Kathy runs through some of her favorite herbs and shares a few recipes that showcase them:

Fossils Go Digital In A Bid To Aid Researchers

15 minutes ago

Many people go to natural history museums to look at dinosaur bones or dioramas of earlier times. But these museums can also house vast collections of fossils used by researchers to study our past. For decades, the only way to know what’s in a collection was to sift through it in person. But now, L.A. County’s Natural History Museum is hoping to change that by bringing their fossils online. KPCC’s Sanden Totten reports.

President Obama will visit Flint, Michigan on Wednesday, where he’ll meet with residents who have been living with lead-tainted tap water for more than two years. Eight-year old Flint resident Mari Copeny will be one of them. Mari, who earned the nickname Little Miss Flint in her community for her activism, wrote to Obama in March, telling him how she’s been trying to help her city, and saying she would love to meet him or Michelle Obama.

The Pros And Cons Of A Gap Year

May 2, 2016

The White House says Malia Obama will attend Harvard University in fall, 2017 after taking a gap year. Once more common among European college students, a number of American students are now taking a year off between high school and college. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks to college counselor Lisa Micele about why some students take gap years, what they do what their time, and how colleges view students who decide to take that year off.

Keeping The Navajo Language Relevant

May 2, 2016

As the largest tribe in the country, more Navajos speak their mother tongue than any other indigenous language in the U.S. But the Navajo language is still considered endangered. Each year, fewer Navajo children speak it. Laurel Morales from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports that there’s a new effort to not only preserve the language, but to revive it.

Listen to more of KJZZ’s coverage of the Navajo language here.

In an era where big sports titles most often go to the wealthiest teams, England’s modest Leicester City Foxes are defying the odds. Specifically 5,000-1 odds. The team that Sports Illustrated calls, “arguably the wildest underdog story in the history of professional sports,” is just one game away from being crowned champions of the English Premier League. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Grant Wahl of Sports Illustrated’s Planet Fútbol about what makes the Foxes such unlikely champions, and what needs to happen to make that dream a reality.

Femi Oke of Al Jazeera English joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss stories currently getting traction on social media.

As the Republican nominating contest turns into a race for delegates and not just votes, some might ask why we even have delegates. Shouldn’t a popular vote suffice? Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Richard Pacelle, professor of political science at the University of Tennessee, to find some answers.

The crew of the Air Force warplane that destroyed a hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan last year did not have access to the “no-strike list” that specifically forbade targeting it, a Pentagon report says today. But the Pentagon says that lapse and the airstrike that killed more than 40 people at the Doctors Without Borders hospital was “caused by a combination of human errors” – not by deliberate action. That’s why US officials say the strike is not a “war crime,” as Doctors Without Borders and other critics have charged.

The odds of making a full recovery following a stroke aren’t great. Nearly half of all people who survive end up either needing permanent assistance to perform basic functions, or wind up in a nursing home.

Physical rehabilitation exercises post-stroke can help people recover use of a damaged limb, but there’s a growing belief that the typical exercises and routines aren’t providing enough repetitions.

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