All Things Considered

Monday - Friday 4pm to 6:30pm, Saturday & Sunday 5pm to 6pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Matt Bingay

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by more than 13 million people on over 600 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Robert Siegel, and local host Matt Bingay, present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special... sometimes quirky... features. Arun Rath hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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U.S.
5:09 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Calif. Firefighters Rush To Get Ahead Of Early Fire Season

The Summit Fire burned hot and fast up the Banning Pass area, near Beaumont, Calif., on May 1, leaving a moonscape in its wake. Houses that had cleared brush and wood from around their property were left unscathed.
Nathan Rott NPR

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 4:39 pm

Fire season is off to an early start in the West. Across California, a hot and dry spring has fire crews on alert. Northeast of Los Angeles, thousands of firefighters are making progress toward controlling the so-called Powerhouse Fire, which has burned more than 30,000 acres and destroyed several homes.

And with no rain in sight, firefighters are out readying homes for a particularly bad year.

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Music Interviews
4:54 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Authentic Early Jazz, From A 23-Year-Old 'WomanChild'

Cecile McLorin Salvant's new album is titled WomanChild.
John Abbott Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 6:53 pm

Jazz musicians Cecile McLorin Salvant and Aaron Diehl, both in their 20s, have already racked up major industry pr

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Monkey See
4:14 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Foster Families Take Center Stage

Cierra Ramirez, Teri Polo, and Jake T. Austin star in ABC Family's The Fosters.
Randy Holmes ABC Family

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 1:42 pm

This summer, NPR is taking a closer look at media for kids, taking it as seriously as what's offered to adults. Our first piece looks at a new show starting Monday night on ABC Family.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Supreme Court Rules DNA Can Be Taken After Arrest

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday in a case that looked at whether police could take DNA samples from people who had been arrested but not yet convicted of a crime.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 6:53 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that police can routinely take DNA samples from people who are arrested but not yet convicted of a crime, and see if the DNA matches any samples from unsolved crimes in a national database.

The 5-to-4 decision split the court's conservative and liberal blocs, with conservative Justice Antonin Scalia authoring a fiery dissent. Twenty-eight states and the federal government have enacted laws that provide for automatic DNA testing of arrestees.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Apple Gets Day In Court Over Alleged E-Book Price Fixing

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 3:52 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now, in today's ALL TECH CONSIDERED, Apple on trial. The company is in federal court today fighting government charges that it colluded with book publishers to drive up the price of electronic books.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Justice Department claims publishers used the introduction of the iPad as an opportunity to set higher prices. Five publishers have already settled civil charges with the government, but Apple has not. Laura Sydell is in New York, covering the first day of the trial. Hi there, Laura.

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Author Interviews
4:02 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Hello Muddah, Hello Drama: The Brief Bloom Of Parodist Allan Sherman

Allan Sherman released three albums between October 1962 and August 1963.
Courtesy Robert Sherman

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 6:53 pm

The summertime novelty tune "Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh" has been pouring out of radios for 50 years now. In late July of 1963, Billboard magazine reported that fans were "actually breaking down doors" of record stores to buy the song about the pains of summer camp.

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Education
5:59 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Why Some Schools Want To Expel Suspensions

When Garfield High School in Los Angeles stopped suspending students for "willful defiance" several years ago. Tuesday, the Los Angeles Unified School District board voted to follow suit in all Los Angeles schools.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 12:12 am

The effectiveness of school suspensions is up for debate. California is the most recent battleground, but a pattern of uneven application and negative outcomes is apparent across the country.

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Books News & Features
5:13 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Arthur Geisert's 'Thunderstorm' Celebrates Life On The Prairie

Arthur Geisert's Thunderstorm follows a tempest in the rural Midwest.
Enchanted Lion Books

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 11:39 am

Arthur Geisert is the author of more than two dozen children's picture books. Three of his titles have won The New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book Award. He's most famous for his intricate illustrations of the Midwest — sprawling prairie, family farms and his signature mischievous pigs.

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From Our Listeners
5:09 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction Readings: 'Litter' And 'The Shirt'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:18 pm

NPR's Bob Mondello and Susan Stamberg read excerpts of two of the best submissions for Round 11 of our short story contest. They read Litter by Kalad Hovatter of Orange, Calif., and The Shirt by Jennifer Anderson of Shorewood, Wis. You can read their full stories below and find other stories on our Three-Minute Fiction page or on Facebook.

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Author Interviews
5:09 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Mapping 'The World' Of A Remote Afghan Village

In Oqa, Afghanistan, Boston weaves a saddlebag for her husband's donkey. The weavers of Oqa also weave large carpets, earning less than $1 a day for their work.
Courtesy Anna Badkhen

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:18 pm

When freelance journalist Anna Badkhen returned to Afghanistan in 2011, she set her eyes on a region so remote it doesn't exist on Google Maps.

In her new book, The World Is A Carpet: Four Seasons in an Afghan Village, Badkhen chronicles her time in Oqa - a rural, rainless village of 240 people and "40 doorless huts."

For many of its residents, survival hinges on the fingers of women and children. They engage in the local tradition of carpet weaving, earning about 40 cents a day for carpets that eventually sell for $5,000 to $20,000 abroad.

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