All Things Considered

Monday - Friday 4pm to 6:30pm, Saturday & Sunday 5pm to 6pm
  • Hosted by Matt Bingay, Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by more than 13 million people on over 600 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Robert Siegel, and local host Matt Bingay, present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special... sometimes quirky... features. Arun Rath hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

A 60,000-Pound Problem

Apr 30, 2016
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 Capital Public Radio. To see more, visit Capital Public Radio.

There's a long-held debate in education. " 'Do you fix education to cure poverty or do you cure poverty to cure education?' And I think that's a false dichotomy," says the superintendent of Camden schools in New Jersey, Paymon Rouhanifard. "You have to address both."

That can be expensive.

In 1997, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that the state's school funding formula was leaving behind poor students. It ordered millions of dollars in additional funding to 31 of the then-poorest districts.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Just when health officials think the Ebola outbreak is over in West Africa, the virus pops up again seemingly out of the blue. It's happened at least five times so far.

Now scientists are starting to figure out why: The virus can lie dormant in a survivor for more than year and then re-emerge to infect others.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In his lab at George Mason University in Virginia, Sean Luke has all kinds of robots: big ones with wheels; medium ones that look like humans. And then he has a couple of dozen that look like small, metal boxes.

He and his team at the Autonomous Robotics Lab are training those little ones to work together without the help of a human.

In the future, Luke and his team hope those little robots can work like ants — in teams of hundreds, for example, to build houses, or help search for survivors after a disaster.

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