On The Next Virginia Insight
4:10 pm
Mon October 24, 2011

The SpongeBob Study

This program was re-broadcast Monday, February 13 at 3pm.

Psychologist Angeline Lillard had been examining story lines of different children's TV shows when she began to notice difficulty getting work done after watching some of those programs in particular.

Eventually this would lead to the now famous "SpongeBob" study... and findings about the deleterious effect of certain kinds of fast-paced TV on young children.

But Dr. Lillard says many of the media reports about her findings have been less than accurate.

We go for the full story with the lead researcher of the so-called "SpongeBob Report."

Guest:
Angeline Lillard, PhD - Lead author of "The Immediate Impact of Different Types of Television on Young Children's Executive Function" in the October, 2011 issue of the journal Pediatrics. Professor of Psychology, University of Virginia.  More information about other child development studies Dr. Lillard and her colleagues are planning, as well as details on how families can participate in those studies, is available at Child Development Laboratories at the University of Virginia.

Additional Contributor:
Jennifer Peterson - Co-author of "The Immediate Impact of Different Types of Television on Young Children's Executive Function" in the October, 2011 issue of the journal Pediatrics. Masters of Education student at the University of Virginia. Speech Pathology Intern at Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego.

Related Program