Matt Bingay

Assistant General Manager, Programming / All Things Considered Host

Matt Bingay is Assistant General Manager for Programming on WMRA and WEMC and the local host for All Things Considered.

Matt began working for WMRA as a student at James Madison University in 1992.  And except for a brief year at New Hampshire Public Radio in Concord, Matt has spent the majority of his public radio career at WMRA.

Matt is also an amateur violist and guitarist, has played soccer since grade school (and still plays today), is always reading something (fiction and non-fiction), has a few marathons under his belt and loves living in the Shenandoah Valley.

Ways to Connect

Identities

Feb 21, 2014
Ryan McVay/Getty Images

In this hour, TED speakers describe their journeys to answer the question: who am I?

Learn more and listen here

Usually during Black History Month, we remember civil rights icons and reflect on their legacy. But over the past couple of years, SOTRU has met a new generation of African American leaders, people you may not see on TV specials or making nationally acclaimed speeches. Most of these men and women are on the front lines of their communities, rolling up their sleeves and diving in to what can be very unglamorous work.

Listen and learn more here.

Dead Reckoning

Feb 15, 2014

From a duel with the world's deadliest disease to a surprising peek into the way doctors think about death, in this hour Radiolab tries to reckon with the grim reaper. And, in the end, we confront the question at the heart of it all — when the time comes to finally leave, how do we want to go? 

Mike Anderson was 36 years old, married, a suburban father of four. He owned a contracting business and built his family’s modest, three-bedroom house in St. Louis from the ground up. He volunteered at church on the weekends and coaches his son’s football team. All pretty normal, right? Except for one thing … which surfaced one day last summer.

Listen and learn more here.

Simply Happy

Feb 14, 2014

In this hour, finding happiness may be simpler than you think.

Learn more and listen here

Brow Anxiety

Feb 12, 2014

During the 1910s and 1920s, the question of whether one was “highbrow” or “lowbrow” became a concern in the minds of modernist Americans. Brooks Hefner (James Madison University) says this “brow anxiety” dominated the career of Willard Huntington Wright, who fancied himself an intellectual aristocrat while secretly writing a series of wildly popular detective stories under the pseudonym S.S. Van Dine. And: When Christopher McGee (Longwood University) first discovered the Hardy Boys books as a child, he had no idea the author, Franklin W.

Pete Souza

Join WMRA and NPR for live special coverage of President Obama's State of the Union address. The address will begin at 9pm this Tuesday night and our coverage will include the Republican response.

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, WMRA presents State of the Re:Union - Who Is This Man? at 3pm, Monday, January 20th.

This December, as you remember and think back over the year, remember WMRA. Your support is needed to help us bring you another year of stories, conversations and deep analysis.

NPR's Here & Now is now on at 1pm weekdays, allowing us to present the full 2-hour program from 1pm - 3pm, Monday through Thursday, and a single hour at 1pm Friday.

Giving Thanks

Nov 28, 2013
Fedorov Oleksiy

With music and stories for Thanksgiving, it's Giving Thanks.

After eight years and about 2,000 stories broadcast, The Story is off the air.

Early Tuesday morning, Virginia Senator Creigh Deeds was involved in an altercation with his son Austin, and the Senator was stabbed at his house in Bath County.  Senator Deeds was seriously wounded, but is reported to be alert and in fair condition at UVA Medical Center.

First responders to the house found Austin, whose nickname was Gus, suffering from life-threatening injuries associated with a gunshot wound. He died at the scene.

On Friday, November 22, 2013, WMRA hosted an evening with Neda Ulaby.

The WMRA Fall Fundraiser raised over $200,000!

Tuesday, September 10th, the Shenandoah Valley Electric Cooperative needed to conduct some power equipment replacement near our main transmitter site. This affected our signal between 9:30am and 12:10pm on that day. In the future, if our signal becomes hard to hear, please keep in mind that you can always listen online.

We are back on the air in Lexington at 89.9, with a new transmitter in place.

Thank you for you patience while we switched out the old one.

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