Matt Bingay

Assistant General Manager, Programming / All Things Considered Host

Matt Bingay is Assistant General Manager for Programming on WMRA and WEMC and the local host for All Things Considered.

Matt began working for WMRA as a student at James Madison University in 1992.  And except for a brief year at New Hampshire Public Radio in Concord, Matt has spent the majority of his public radio career at WMRA.

Matt is also an amateur violist and guitarist, has played soccer since grade school (and still plays today), is always reading something (fiction and non-fiction), has a few marathons under his belt and loves living in the Shenandoah Valley.

Ways to Connect

I Was So High

May 3, 2014
Jody McIntyre

Your waitress. Your colleagues at work. Your doctor. Maybe even your parents. They’re all high. All the time. That’s what it feels like anyway. This week, stories in which drug use and daily life intersect – and in which people get high in secret and then do their best to function in the non-high world. Also, we hear some “I Was So High” stories from our very own listeners.

Listen and Learn More Here.

Spoken and Unspoken

May 2, 2014
Thinkstock

In this hour, TED speakers reflect on how words and methods of communication affect us, more than you might expect.

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Carbon Curves

Apr 20, 2014

When environmental scientist Jane Lubchenco served as administrator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration from 2009 to 2013, the U.S.

Dust to Dust

Apr 20, 2014
Charles Peales

Scientists project that nearly 20,000 species across the globe are at a high risk of extinction, and that within the next 300 years, some 75 percent of all mammals could completely disappear from Earth. Experts say that we are in the middle of the sixth mass extinction of life on earth. And what distinguishes it from the previous five extinctions is that it is being caused by humans.

Race

Apr 19, 2014
Shea Walsh

This hour of Radiolab, a look at race.  When the human genome was first fully mapped in 2000, Bill Clinton, Craig Venter, and Francis Collins took the stage and pronounced that "The concept of race has no genetic or scientific basis." Great words spoken with great intentions. But what do they really mean, and where do they leave us? Our genes are nearly all the same, but that hasn't made race meaningless, or wiped out our evolving conversation about it.

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We asked listeners to send us their best coincidence stories, and we got more than 1,300 submissions! There were so many good ones we decided to make a whole show about them. From a chance encounter at a bus station to a romantic dollar bill to a baffling apparition in a college shower stall. See more of your coincidence stories — with photos — here.

Listen and Learn More Here.

Believers and Doubters

Apr 18, 2014
flcarcavallo/thinkstock

In this hour, TED speakers offer perspectives on belief from all ends of the spectrum, from atheists to the devout.

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Bible Babel

Apr 16, 2014

In her book Bible Babel: Making Sense of the Most Talked About Book of All Time, Kristin Swenson explains what the Bible is, where it comes from, and how it’s relevant today. Also featured: Edward Neukrug (Old Dominion University) has collected oral histories of colleagues and former patients of some of the great psychologists of our time, including B.F. Skinner and Carl Rogers.

Puck, 1898

In 1898, President McKinley called for war with Spain to liberate Cuba from the “barbarities, bloodshed, starvation, and horrible miseries now existing there”—offering a humanitarian justification that has underpinned other interventions, from Haiti in 1915 to Libya in 2011. But in 1994, President Clinton took a stance against intervening in Rwanda, even as the scale of the humanitarian crisis there became clear. As we mark the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide, BackStory takes on the history of humanitarian intervention.

23 Weeks 6 Days

Apr 12, 2014

When Kelley Benham and her husband Tom French finally got pregnant, after many attempts and a good deal of technological help, everything was perfect. Until it wasn't. Their story raises questions that, until recently, no parent had to face… and that are still nearly impossible to answer.

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