Matt Bingay

Assistant General Manager, Programming / All Things Considered Host

Matt Bingay is Assistant General Manager for Programming on WMRA and WEMC and the local host for All Things Considered.

Matt began working for WMRA as a student at James Madison University in 1992.  And except for a brief year at New Hampshire Public Radio in Concord, Matt has spent the majority of his public radio career at WMRA.

Matt is also an amateur violist and guitarist, has played soccer since grade school (and still plays today), is always reading something (fiction and non-fiction), has a few marathons under his belt and loves living in the Shenandoah Valley.

Ways to Connect

Bible Babel

Apr 16, 2014

In her book Bible Babel: Making Sense of the Most Talked About Book of All Time, Kristin Swenson explains what the Bible is, where it comes from, and how it’s relevant today. Also featured: Edward Neukrug (Old Dominion University) has collected oral histories of colleagues and former patients of some of the great psychologists of our time, including B.F. Skinner and Carl Rogers.

Puck, 1898

In 1898, President McKinley called for war with Spain to liberate Cuba from the “barbarities, bloodshed, starvation, and horrible miseries now existing there”—offering a humanitarian justification that has underpinned other interventions, from Haiti in 1915 to Libya in 2011. But in 1994, President Clinton took a stance against intervening in Rwanda, even as the scale of the humanitarian crisis there became clear. As we mark the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide, BackStory takes on the history of humanitarian intervention.

23 Weeks 6 Days

Apr 12, 2014

When Kelley Benham and her husband Tom French finally got pregnant, after many attempts and a good deal of technological help, everything was perfect. Until it wasn't. Their story raises questions that, until recently, no parent had to face… and that are still nearly impossible to answer.

Tarred and Feathered

Apr 12, 2014
Belfast Telegraph

This week, stories of people being threatened and punished with public shame. Including the story of someone who was literally tarred and feathered. It happened a lot more recently than you'd guess.

Listen and Learn More Here.

Framing the Story

Apr 11, 2014

In this hour, TED speakers explore the art of storytelling — and how good stories have the power to transform our perceptions of the world.

Listen and Learn More Here.

George Caleb Bingham

Today when we vote, we enter a private space, secretly make our choice, and go about our day. Don Debats (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities Fellow) explains that early voting wasn’t just public; it was a raucous, drunken community festival. Plus: It’s hard to find a smile in a 19th century photograph—instead, you’ll see stern faces and stiff poses.

In the late 19th century, German medical practices were considered to be the best in the world. But by the start of World War II, German physicians were directly involved in the mass killings of the Holocaust. Theodore Reiff (Christopher Newport University) looks at the subversion of German doctors in the Nazi era. Also featured: The movie The Great Escape dramatizes the experience of American and European prisoners of war in Germany during World War II.

Thomas James

Is the college of the future online? With the popularity of MOOCs (massive open online courses) and the availability of online degree programs at a fraction of their on-campus price, we are experiencing an exciting experiment in higher education. Does the traditional classroom stand a chance? Will online education be the great equalizer, or is a campus-based college experience still necessary?

Listen and learn more here.

Puck, 1898.

With President Obama making the case for military action against Syria, BackStory takes on the history of humanitarian intervention. In 1898, President McKinley called for war with Spain to liberate Cuba from the “barbarities, bloodshed, starvation, and horrible miseries now existing there” – offering the kind of humanitarian rhetoric that has come up time and time again in American history, justifying numerous interventions around the world – from Haiti in 1915 to Libya in 2011. But where does the idea of a humanitarian obligation originate?

The Soul Patch

Apr 5, 2014
xtopalopaquetl/flickr

This hour, stories of unlikely (and surprisingly simple) answers to seemingly unsolvable problems.

We get to know a man who struggles, and mostly fails, to contain his violent outbursts...until he meets a bird who can keep him in check. Then, Oliver Sacks and Chuck Close, who are both face-blind, share workarounds that help them figure out who they’re talking to. And a senior center stumbles upon an unexpected way to help Alzheimer’s patients -- by building a bus stop.

Listen and Learn more here.

Tribes

Apr 5, 2014

A Native American tribe is doing exactly the opposite of what you'd think they'd do: they're kicking people out of the tribe, huge numbers of them, including people whose ancestors without question were part of the tribe. And the story of a white guy who only wants to date Asian women, who then has to adjust to the reality of a real actual Asian woman in his life. The phrase "finding your tribe" is a total cliche — but one that does apply to certain situations.

Listen and learn more here.

The Money Paradox

Apr 4, 2014
iStockphoto

How does money motivate, trick, satisfy and disappoint us? In this hour, TED speakers share insights into our relationship with money.

Listen and learn more here.

Mountain Meltdown

Mar 30, 2014
Ed Ritger

SNOW SNOW SNOW  --- It’s been a big year for that in our area, but around the world the mountain snowpack is declining which is bad news for ski areas and the water supply for those who depend on the run-off.

LOC

In February, President Obama signed an executive order raising the minimum wage to $10.10 for federal contract workers. With minimum wage increases being debated in 24 states, Obama is also calling on Congress to raise the minimum wage for all workers — even as the CBO estimates that such a move could cost the economy 500,000 jobs. On this episode of BackStory, we’re exploring the history of American thinking about wage work. We’ll hear how the early colonies shifted away from indentured servitude, and toward racially-based slavery.

KILL EM' ALL

Mar 29, 2014
US National Library of Medicine

They buzz. They bite. And they have killed more people than cancer, war, or heart disease. Here’s the question: If you could wipe mosquitoes off the face of the planet, would you? 

Apocalyptical

Mar 29, 2014

In this live stage performance, Radiolab turns its gaze to the topic of endings, both blazingly fast and agonizingly slow.

Listen and learn more here.

Misconceptions

Mar 28, 2014
Steve McAlister/Getty Images

In this hour, TED speakers move beyond conventional wisdom and reveal complex realities about what we think we know to be true.

Listen and learn more here.

Bad Baby

Mar 28, 2014
Chris Gethard

They're small. And they're cuddly. But sometimes it feels as though our babies were replaced with demon replicas — controlling, demanding, or just downright awful. This week, stories of infants and children who dominate the adults around them with their baditude, or whom adults have painted with the "bad" brush from early on. We also ask the question: at what age does badness begin?

Listen and learn more here.

Maria DeValpine

There is an extreme shortage of nurses in “bush” Alaska, a stunningly beautiful part of the world only reachable by plane or barge.  Maria DeValpine (James Madison University) has spent the last three years learning why nurses elect to stay in this challenging environment on the edge of the earth.

Thomas James

Disarming Syria. Asylum for Edward Snowden. Arming Iran. Deploying troops to Crimea. Is Vladimir Putin flexing his muscles, while our own president fades into the background of world politics, or is it all a global game of smoke and mirrors? Russia is one of the world’s largest oil producers and has the power of veto on the U.N. Security Council, but it remains an authoritarian state, rife with corruption and economic struggles. Is our toxic relationship something to worry about, or is Putin’s Russia fading in importance?

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