Matt Bingay

Assistant General Manager, Programming / All Things Considered Host

Matt Bingay is Assistant General Manager for Programming on WMRA and WEMC and the local host for All Things Considered.

Matt began working for WMRA as a student at James Madison University in 1992.  And except for a brief year at New Hampshire Public Radio in Concord, Matt has spent the majority of his public radio career at WMRA.

Matt is also an amateur violist and guitarist, has played soccer since grade school (and still plays today), is always reading something (fiction and non-fiction), has a few marathons under his belt and loves living in the Shenandoah Valley.

Ways to Connect

2014 Fall Fundraiser

Sep 29, 2014

WMRA's 2014 Fall Fundraiser is underway!

Please Give Now and support the news, music and information you rely on.

Saturday September 20th, WMRA is celebrating A Prairie Home Companion's 40th anniversary season with a live videocast at Blue Sprocket Sound, 44 Miller circle in Harrisonburg. The event is SOLD OUT.

WMRA - Back on the Air

Aug 12, 2014

Due to a power failure at our main transmitter site (WMRA 90.7) we were off the air from 11:45am to 12:05pm in the valley at 90.7fm, and in Winchester at 94.5fm.  Power crews needed to replace components in a power substation.

Classical music is now a more prominent part of the daily broadcasts on WEMC including showcases of some of the nation’s premiere symphony orchestras.

We’re now featuring live performances from the Chicago Symphony, the Pittsburgh Symphony and the New York Philharmonic, as well as performances by the Chamber Society of Lincoln Center and highlights from Germany’s Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts. We’re also giving you a second opportunity to hear Mostly Mennonite, Mostly Accapella and Air Play.

Our Lexington transmitter, WMLU 89.9fm, is on the air and broadcasting.  We were off the air earlier today due to a generator failure on the campus of VMI, where our transmitter is located.

Our Charlottesville transmitter (WMRY) was off the air from Thursday night to Friday morning, but we're now back up to full power.

$70,000... Thank You!

Jun 9, 2014

The WMRA June Fundraiser ended Friday, June 6, with over $70,000 raised.

Thank you very much to all who contributed to help us get closer to ending our budget year in the black.

Also, thank you to all who contributed to the Member Matching Fund, and to the many businesses and individuals who issued challenges and contributed giveaways.

If you couldn't find the time to support WMRA during our Bridge The Gap June drive, please give now.

For Memorial Day, WMRA presents a special called  Food, Fun, and Relationships from the program series Innovation Hub. All those popsicles and ice cream cones you're gearing up to eat? Hear Dr. Robert Lustig explain why new research shows that we're addicted to sugar. Then, before you head off to Epcot and the Magic Kingdom, we look at what made Walt Disney so innovative.

Library of Congress

When Shenandoah National Park was built, hundreds of families were forced off their land. Margaret Marangione (Blue Ridge Community College) says new information has emerged suggesting that some of those displaced people were sent to state colonies and sterilized. Plus: Veterans of the Revolutionary War collected the nation’s first pensions for wounded soldiers.

Are humans basically selfish, or basically giving? There’s a widespread assumption that you have to offer people incentives to do good deeds and threaten punishment to stop them from doing evil deeds. But the way people act in the real world often contradicts that idea. Humans may actually have been shaped by evolution to care about each other, to share, and to cooperate. The Really Big Question explores this concept with researchers and everyday people about why we cooperate and share.

Listen and Learn More Here.

Stars & Tsars

May 4, 2014

In the past year, the White House and the Kremlin have sparred over Syria, the Winter Olympics, and now, the crisis in Ukraine. It can be tempting to view these events through the familiar lens of the Cold War, but in this episode, the History Guys probe the deeper history of our relationship with Russia — and discover moments of comity as well as conflict.

Blame

May 3, 2014
Susan Sermoneta/flickr/CC-BY-2.0

We've all felt it, that irresistible urge to point the finger. But new technologies are complicating age-old moral conundrums about accountability. This hour, we ask what blame does for us -- why do we need it, when isn't it enough, and what happens when we try to push past it with forgiveness and mercy?

Listen and Learn More Here.

I Was So High

May 3, 2014
Jody McIntyre

Your waitress. Your colleagues at work. Your doctor. Maybe even your parents. They’re all high. All the time. That’s what it feels like anyway. This week, stories in which drug use and daily life intersect – and in which people get high in secret and then do their best to function in the non-high world. Also, we hear some “I Was So High” stories from our very own listeners.

Listen and Learn More Here.

Spoken and Unspoken

May 2, 2014
Thinkstock

In this hour, TED speakers reflect on how words and methods of communication affect us, more than you might expect.

Listen and Learn More Here.

Carbon Curves

Apr 20, 2014

When environmental scientist Jane Lubchenco served as administrator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration from 2009 to 2013, the U.S.

Dust to Dust

Apr 20, 2014
Charles Peales

Scientists project that nearly 20,000 species across the globe are at a high risk of extinction, and that within the next 300 years, some 75 percent of all mammals could completely disappear from Earth. Experts say that we are in the middle of the sixth mass extinction of life on earth. And what distinguishes it from the previous five extinctions is that it is being caused by humans.

Race

Apr 19, 2014
Shea Walsh

This hour of Radiolab, a look at race.  When the human genome was first fully mapped in 2000, Bill Clinton, Craig Venter, and Francis Collins took the stage and pronounced that "The concept of race has no genetic or scientific basis." Great words spoken with great intentions. But what do they really mean, and where do they leave us? Our genes are nearly all the same, but that hasn't made race meaningless, or wiped out our evolving conversation about it.

Listen and Learn More Here.

We asked listeners to send us their best coincidence stories, and we got more than 1,300 submissions! There were so many good ones we decided to make a whole show about them. From a chance encounter at a bus station to a romantic dollar bill to a baffling apparition in a college shower stall. See more of your coincidence stories — with photos — here.

Listen and Learn More Here.

Believers and Doubters

Apr 18, 2014
flcarcavallo/thinkstock

In this hour, TED speakers offer perspectives on belief from all ends of the spectrum, from atheists to the devout.

Listen and Learn More Here.

Bible Babel

Apr 16, 2014

In her book Bible Babel: Making Sense of the Most Talked About Book of All Time, Kristin Swenson explains what the Bible is, where it comes from, and how it’s relevant today. Also featured: Edward Neukrug (Old Dominion University) has collected oral histories of colleagues and former patients of some of the great psychologists of our time, including B.F. Skinner and Carl Rogers.

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