Marguerite Gallorini

Freelance Reporter

Marguerite is a French journalist and a Sorbonne Nouvelle graduate. She has two Master's degrees - one in bilingual journalism, and one in international studies, and she spent one semester at New York University. Her research has included cultural identity and diaspora studies, and media studies, and she wrote two theses on the historical role newspapers played in the making of their countries' history in the early 20th century (in Ireland and the U.S.).

It is through friendships made at NYU that she ended up at WMRA. Before all that, she studied a year in Greece as part of her bachelor in sociology, to practice the little modern Greek she learned at university. Since then, Greece has remained in her heart and mind... and going back there for good is a (not so) secret wish of hers.

She also took summer classes in general journalism at the London School of Journalism, after having backpacked a month in Ireland for a project related to Ireland's war-themed music legacy. Marguerite is a fan of The Dropkick Murphys, by the way.

She likes to say that she plays alto saxophone - but, really, she is ashamed to say that, since she never sticks to practicing on a regular basis.  But she can proudly say she used to play the oboe very well for seven years.

Lulu Miller, former Radiolab producer and co-founder and co-host of Invisibilia on NPR, is currently a fellow at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities to write her book: Why Fish Don’t Exist, looking at how we categorize the world.  Virginia performed the second-highest number of forced sterilizations in the country, and a chapter in her book focuses on the not-so-old practice of eugenics. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

Some experts say the teacher shortage in Virginia is now a crisis. And not only is there a downward trend in enrollment in teaching curriculums overall, but the lack of African-Americans in that field is even more alarming at a time when diversity in classrooms is becoming increasingly necessary. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has this overview.

Marguerite Gallorini

The aftermath of August 12 in Charlottesville prompted many responses, including a report that was released on Friday [Dec. 1] citing multiple problems with the police response to the white supremacists that rallied over the summer.  But there have also been calls for more regulation of weapons and private militias in the city. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has this overview of those proposals.

Marguerite Gallorini

On Sunday, the League of Women Voters of the Charlottesville Area organized a Meet and Greet between residents and their delegates - including Democratic House Minority Leader David Toscano. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini was there.

Every Saturday before Thanksgiving, National Adoption Day is celebrated through various events in the country - and in the region. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has this preview.

Marguerite Gallorini

Former Secretary of State and First Lady Hillary Clinton provided the closing remarks of the University of Virginia's two-day Women's Global Leadership forum Tuesday afternoon, as part of the university's bicentennial commemoration. Topics included sexism in politics and elsewhere, but also the protection of democracy in the U.S. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini has more.

The 30th annual Virginia Film Festival kicks off Thursday, with more than 120 films over the weekend throughout Charlottesville. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has this preview.

Marguerite Gallorini

As Virginians went to the polls to select the next governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, as well as candidates for the House of Delegates, WMRA's Christopher Clymer Kurtz and Marguerite Gallorini talked to some of them.

TEDx Charlottesville is back for its 8th edition this year, and promises a full day of inspiring talks Friday, Nov. 3 at the Paramount Theater. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has this preview.

Zaakir Tameez

Over the summer, Governor Terry McAuliffe signed an Executive Directive setting up a Millennial Civic Engagement Task Force. Its goal: get millennials more engaged throughout the Commonwealth. The Task Force held a summit last Friday in Richmond, and WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini talked to one of the participants.

Courtesy of the Miller Center

In an event organized by the University of Virginia and the Miller Center, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, himself the son of a World War II refugee, reflected on the reasons of the white supremacist violence in August and in the nation. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has more.

Marguerite Gallorini

Increasingly, Virginia schools are getting financial support to seek a more diverse population in STEM programs -- that's science, technology, engineering and math. In Charlottesville, grants are funding a partnership between Piedmont Virginia Community College, the University of Virginia and Buford Middle School to make that dream come true. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has this report.

Marguerite Gallorini

Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam met with Charlottesville residents on Sunday.  Northam is the Democratic candidate for governor.  WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini talked with him.

Marguerite Gallorini

Children with disabilities are some of the most frequently suspended students in public schools, according to a recent report. What does that mean for the future of special education? More and more attention is given to alternative education programs. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini visits a special kind of school in Charlottesville.

Marguerite Gallorini

The University of Virginia and its Commission on Slavery teamed up with the Slave Dwelling Project to organize a symposium called “Universities, Slavery, Public Memory and the Built Landscape.” This four-day conference will end with a field trip to Montpelier, Monticello and Highland on Saturday. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini was at the opening reception Wednesday [October 18] and filed this report.

Courtesy Lock & Talk Virginia

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month - which will be recognized at Piedmont Virginia Community College through an event organized by the Lock & Talk Virginia campaign, brought by the Health Planning Region One Suicide Prevention Committee. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini talked with its program coordinator Rebecca Textor.

Marguerite Gallorini

What is the best practice to address the epidemics related to opioid use in Virginia – and in the nation? Last month, WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reported on alternatives to prescribing opiates.  This week, a group of Canadian health care professionals are in Charlottesville as part of a two-day conference on the subject organized by the Center for Global Health at UVa. Marguerite has more.

Marguerite Gallorini

Frank Dukes, a fellow at the Institute for Environmental Negotiation at UVa, is one of two presenters at an event today at JMU called "Why Confederate Monuments Matter: Charlottesville and Beyond."  WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini has this report.

Tomtoberfest is here! Today and tomorrow, the Tom Tom Fall festival is celebrating creative community and local innovation with, among other things, two free days of concert at Emancipation Park in Charlottesville. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini talked with founder Tom Beyer about how the fall’s events differ from the big festival in the Spring.

Marguerite Gallorini

One month ago three people died in Charlottesville in a violent day of white supremacist hatred and violent clashes with counter-protesters.  But how does the community heal after such a trauma? Several groups are providing free counseling and wellness services to the residents of Charlottesville who have been affected in one way or another by the violence of that weekend. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has more.

Marguerite Gallorini

What is the state, and future, of investigative journalism under the new Trump administration? To try to answer to this question and many more, the Miller Center in Charlottesville invited a panel of prominent investigative journalists from The New York Times, ProPublica and BuzzFeed News. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini was there.

Marguerite Gallorini

Margot Lee Shetterly is the author of the New York Times bestseller Hidden Figures, about the true story of a group of black female mathematicians working at NASA and helping America dominate aeronautics, space research, and computer technology – although no textbook acknowledges their work. She discussed her novel yesterday at the Paramount Theater, in a lecture part of UVa’s Engagement Lecture Series. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

A new project at UVa's law school aims to improve the criminal justice system, based on a thorough study of criminal justice data. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini talked to Professor Brandon Garrett, a member of the project’s leadership team.

Marguerite Gallorini

At yesterday's Facuty Senate meeting, UVa President Teresa Sullivan presented the actions the university has taken since the events of August 11 and 12. She was accompanied by Risa Goluboff, Dean of the School of Law and chair of a UVa working group of deans and community members to assess the University's response to the events. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

The Charlottesville Pride Festival is September 16, but a week of events leading up to the festival begin this Saturday (Sept. 9). WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini talked with the leader of the organization behind the festival.

Marguerite Gallorini

The local chapter of 100 Black Women will launch this fall. It has been in the making for the past year, with many local professional women pitching in. One of them is Shantron Franklin-Sims, who has taken a leadership role in the fledgling organization. And she is the subject of the next installment of our Women of Interest series.  WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has her profile.

Marguerite Gallorini

Charlottesville City Council members met behind closed doors on Wednesday afternoon, and afterward Mayor Mike Signer apologized.  WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has more.

Marguerite Gallorini

The Vietnam War is the focus of a new PBS documentary produced by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick.  Marc Selverstone, associate professor in presidential studies at the Miller Center and specialist of the Cold War and the Vietnam War, discussed his role as a consultant for the film at the Miller Center yesterday.  WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini reports.

Courtesy Jennifer Doleac

Do Ban the Box laws do more harm than good?  That policy, which removes the box on a job application form that asks about a job seeker’s criminal history, aims to give ex-felons a better chance to re-enter the workforce. Some praise the policy’s impact, but research suggests it might have unfortunate unintended consequences, and may even harm young black applicants. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

Marguerite Gallorini

Former Albemarle NAACP director Rick Turner spoke at Saturday’s monthly Democratic Breakfast about racial disparities in the education system. He and other panelists talked about how school discipline practices lead to disproportionate discipline for racial minorities, and ultimately, to increased contact with the criminal justice system. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

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