Marguerite Gallorini

Freelance Reporter

Marguerite is a French journalist and a Sorbonne Nouvelle graduate. She has two Master's degrees - one in bilingual journalism, and one in international studies, and she spent one semester at New York University. Her research has included cultural identity and diaspora studies, and media studies, and she wrote two theses on the historical role newspapers played in the making of their countries' history in the early 20th century (in Ireland and the U.S.).

It is through friendships made at NYU that she ended up at WMRA. Before all that, she studied a year in Greece as part of her bachelor in sociology, to practice the little modern Greek she learned at university. Since then, Greece has remained in her heart and mind... and going back there for good is a (not so) secret wish of hers.

She also took summer classes in general journalism at the London School of Journalism, after having backpacked a month in Ireland for a project related to Ireland's war-themed music legacy. Marguerite is a fan of The Dropkick Murphys, by the way.

She likes to say that she plays alto saxophone - but, really, she is ashamed to say that, since she never sticks to practicing on a regular basis.  But she can proudly say she used to play the oboe very well for seven years.

Marguerite Gallorini

Children with disabilities are some of the most frequently suspended students in public schools, according to a recent report. What does that mean for the future of special education? More and more attention is given to alternative education programs. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini visits a special kind of school in Charlottesville.

Marguerite Gallorini

The University of Virginia and its Commission on Slavery teamed up with the Slave Dwelling Project to organize a symposium called “Universities, Slavery, Public Memory and the Built Landscape.” This four-day conference will end with a field trip to Montpelier, Monticello and Highland on Saturday. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini was at the opening reception Wednesday [October 18] and filed this report.

Courtesy Lock & Talk Virginia

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month - which will be recognized at Piedmont Virginia Community College through an event organized by the Lock & Talk Virginia campaign, brought by the Health Planning Region One Suicide Prevention Committee. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini talked with its program coordinator Rebecca Textor.

Marguerite Gallorini

What is the best practice to address the epidemics related to opioid use in Virginia – and in the nation? Last month, WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reported on alternatives to prescribing opiates.  This week, a group of Canadian health care professionals are in Charlottesville as part of a two-day conference on the subject organized by the Center for Global Health at UVa. Marguerite has more.

Marguerite Gallorini

Frank Dukes, a fellow at the Institute for Environmental Negotiation at UVa, is one of two presenters at an event today at JMU called "Why Confederate Monuments Matter: Charlottesville and Beyond."  WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini has this report.

Tomtoberfest is here! Today and tomorrow, the Tom Tom Fall festival is celebrating creative community and local innovation with, among other things, two free days of concert at Emancipation Park in Charlottesville. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini talked with founder Tom Beyer about how the fall’s events differ from the big festival in the Spring.

Marguerite Gallorini

One month ago three people died in Charlottesville in a violent day of white supremacist hatred and violent clashes with counter-protesters.  But how does the community heal after such a trauma? Several groups are providing free counseling and wellness services to the residents of Charlottesville who have been affected in one way or another by the violence of that weekend. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has more.

Marguerite Gallorini

What is the state, and future, of investigative journalism under the new Trump administration? To try to answer to this question and many more, the Miller Center in Charlottesville invited a panel of prominent investigative journalists from The New York Times, ProPublica and BuzzFeed News. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini was there.

Marguerite Gallorini

Margot Lee Shetterly is the author of the New York Times bestseller Hidden Figures, about the true story of a group of black female mathematicians working at NASA and helping America dominate aeronautics, space research, and computer technology – although no textbook acknowledges their work. She discussed her novel yesterday at the Paramount Theater, in a lecture part of UVa’s Engagement Lecture Series. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

A new project at UVa's law school aims to improve the criminal justice system, based on a thorough study of criminal justice data. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini talked to Professor Brandon Garrett, a member of the project’s leadership team.

Marguerite Gallorini

At yesterday's Facuty Senate meeting, UVa President Teresa Sullivan presented the actions the university has taken since the events of August 11 and 12. She was accompanied by Risa Goluboff, Dean of the School of Law and chair of a UVa working group of deans and community members to assess the University's response to the events. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

The Charlottesville Pride Festival is September 16, but a week of events leading up to the festival begin this Saturday (Sept. 9). WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini talked with the leader of the organization behind the festival.

Marguerite Gallorini

The local chapter of 100 Black Women will launch this fall. It has been in the making for the past year, with many local professional women pitching in. One of them is Shantron Franklin-Sims, who has taken a leadership role in the fledgling organization. And she is the subject of the next installment of our Women of Interest series.  WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has her profile.

Marguerite Gallorini

Charlottesville City Council members met behind closed doors on Wednesday afternoon, and afterward Mayor Mike Signer apologized.  WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has more.

Marguerite Gallorini

The Vietnam War is the focus of a new PBS documentary produced by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick.  Marc Selverstone, associate professor in presidential studies at the Miller Center and specialist of the Cold War and the Vietnam War, discussed his role as a consultant for the film at the Miller Center yesterday.  WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini reports.

Courtesy Jennifer Doleac

Do Ban the Box laws do more harm than good?  That policy, which removes the box on a job application form that asks about a job seeker’s criminal history, aims to give ex-felons a better chance to re-enter the workforce. Some praise the policy’s impact, but research suggests it might have unfortunate unintended consequences, and may even harm young black applicants. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

Marguerite Gallorini

Former Albemarle NAACP director Rick Turner spoke at Saturday’s monthly Democratic Breakfast about racial disparities in the education system. He and other panelists talked about how school discipline practices lead to disproportionate discipline for racial minorities, and ultimately, to increased contact with the criminal justice system. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

Marguerite Gallorini

Monday evening, the Jefferson School's African-American Heritage Center hosted a Community Conversation to talk about Saturday's violence in the city, and how to move forward.  WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini was there.

Marguerite Gallorini

Charlottesville’s Police Department is again under heavy criticism. After last month’s KKK rally, some blamed the police for taking an over-militarized, aggressive approach towards protesters. Now, some are saying the police erred in the other direction, and in many instances of disorder did nothing. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

Marguerite Gallorini

As crowds were beginning to disperse after Saturday’s rally of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and KKK members in Charlottesville, a car plunged into a crowd of peaceful counter-protesters near the downtown mall.  One woman was killed, and 19 others in the street were injured.  WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini was there when it happened.

In July, a committee of scientists and legal experts chaired by UVa law professor Richard Bonnie, made several recommendations to address the opioid problem. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini talked to him and some Charlottesville-area health care professionals about the report, and about possible solutions.

Marguerite Gallorini

The Chihamba African American Cultural Arts Festival will launch its 28th edition this week, Thursday through Saturday. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has this preview.

Marguerite Gallorini

Of the 15 residents speaking at last night’s city council meeting in Charlottesville, 13 complained about the militarization of the Charlottesville police at the KKK counter-protests on July 8th.  WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

Marguerite Gallorini

Former Washington correspondent for the Boston Globe Thomas Oliphant spoke at the Miller Center of Public Affairs yesterday to discuss John F. Kennedy’s continued legacy on the 100th anniversary of his birth on May 29. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini was there.

Marguerite Gallorini

How can the environmental community unite to make a difference at the grassroots level?  Answering that question was the goal of the Annual Choose Clean Water Coalition Conference, which convened Wednesday and Thursday in Charlottesville.  And as WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports, participants regarded past successes as a guide for the future of environmental activism.

Marguerite Gallorini

Patients waiting for hours, doctors delayed, missing patient files ... These are common health care scenarios that could be improved with a better communication system. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini talked to three business students at UVa about their new app, Tandem Medical, designed to solve these problems.

Charlottesville City Council voted 3-2 on Monday to sell to the highest bidder the Robert E. Lee statue that has been the subject of so much controversy.  In February, Council had voted by the same margin to remove the monument from Lee Park – a controversial vote that spurred a lawsuit against the City Council, limiting its action for now.  WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reports.

Marguerite Gallorini

It’s billed as a week of innovation and art, with Charlottesville itself as the canvas.  The sixth annual Tom Tom Founders Festival is happening this week in Charlottesville. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has the story.

Courtesy of Chloe Bertholon

During her summer internship at WMRA Marguerite Gallorini, who is from France, has been exploring the differences, and similarities, between the ways that Americans and the French approach today’s world.  In the last few weeks, that’s included the global refugee crisis, and how we view work and vacation time.  Today, Marguerite has some insight on how the American presidential election campaign is being viewed from the French perspective.

Marguerite Gallorini

During this American election year, NPR has been exploring how people in other countries view the United States.  WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini gets the reaction of French immigrants to the U.S., in particular how they feel about a distinctly different approach the two countries take to work life and vacation time.

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