NPR Story
2:01 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Life After Exoneration, For The Victims On Both Sides

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 3:34 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee in Washington. In the summer of 2002, Brian Banks was a promising high school football player with a verbal agreement to play college ball on a scholarship at USC. But when another student accused him of rape, that all changed.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Op-Ed: What Exhumation Means For A Legacy

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 3:34 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

But now to The Opinion Page. A week ago today, Chilean authorities exhumed the remains of Pablo Neruda, a poet, politician and diplomat who penned thousands of works, some of them like "Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair" almost ubiquitous in Hispanic culture. For nearly 40 years, it's been generally accepted that Neruda died of cancer, but some still insist Neruda was actually poisoned just days after General Augusto Pinochet came to power.

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The Two-Way
1:23 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Remains Sent From Vietnam To Hawaii May Be Those Of U.S. Service Member

Vietnam has sent what analysts believe could be the remains of a member of the American military who died in the country during the Vietnam War. After a repatriation ceremony at the airport in Da Nang Sunday, the remains were sent to Hawaii for examination and possible identification.

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Children's Health
1:18 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

The Doctor Trying To Solve The Mystery Of Food Allergies

matsou iStockPhoto

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 2:05 pm

No one is certain why food allergies are on the rise. By now nearly 15 million Americans have a food allergy, ranging from moderate to severe. One of every 13 children has one. Nuts, soy, milk, egg, wheat and shellfish are some of the foods that most commonly set off allergic reactions. In some cases, the reaction can be so severe that it results in the throat swelling up and closing, leading to death. For a child with a severe food allergy, every meal that isn't made under appropriate supervision can be hazardous.

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The Two-Way
1:06 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Oh, Yeah! Kool-Aid Man Gets A Makeover And A Personality

The new Kool-Aid Man.
PR Newswire

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:22 pm

Smashing through walls and yelling "Oh, Yeah!" apparently aren't cool enough for Kool-Aid Man anymore.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

European Union Report Details Growth Of Human Trafficking

EU Home Affairs Commissioner Cecilia Malmström said Monday that "trafficking in human beings is all around us, closer than we think."
European Union

More than 23,600 people were victims of human trafficking in Europe during a recent three-year period, according to a new European Union report that says the problem is growing worse. Its authors say the official figures do not come close to describing the crime, which has "hundreds of thousands of victims."

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The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Africans Win At Boston Marathon

The scene at the start of the elite women's division of the Boston Marathon on Monday.
Dominick Reuter Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 4:54 pm

Ethiopian runner Lelisa Desisa won the men's division at this year's Boston Marathon on Monday, finishing the 26.2 miles in 2 hours, 10 minutes and 22 seconds. It's the first win at Boston for the 23-year-old.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Mon April 15, 2013

March Was Cool, But Winter Was Warmer Than Average

In January, coats and gloves were optional as skaters enjoyed temperatures in the 40s and 50s at New York City's Bryant Park.
Mario Tama Getty Images

How wrong was Punxsutawney Phil when the groundhog said on Feb. 2 that we'd have an early spring?

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It's All Politics
11:40 am
Mon April 15, 2013

While Congress Slumbers, Laws Pass Elsewhere

A sliver of moon rises behind the Capitol dome in Washington, D.C. While Congress has shown signs of life this spring, its veritable hibernation has left plenty of room for states to experiment with policy.
Bill O'Leary The Washington Post via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 2:10 pm

Maybe Barack Obama would be happier as a governor.

It's early days in his second term, but the president's agenda doesn't appear to have a whole lot of momentum. His budget last week was greeted with more criticism than applause from Democrats and Republicans alike.

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The Salt
11:40 am
Mon April 15, 2013

First, You Growl: When Your Dog's Food Is Recalled For Salmonella

Salmonella and other pathogens can be in pet food, not just people food.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:43 pm

Ashley Chaifetz is getting a Ph.D. in food safety policy, so you'd figure she knows a thing or two about keeping bad microbes out of her house.

So she was more than a little surprised when she got an email from her online pet food purveyor, saying that they'd sold her dry dog food that might be contaminated with salmonella.

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