NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

DREAMer Hopes For Full Citizenship

Renata Teodoro is pictured in the Here & Now studios. (Here & Now)

As a child, 25-year-old Renata Teodoro was brought to the U.S. from Brazil by her parents, who lived and worked in the Boston area until her father’s asylum application was denied and her mother was deported.

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

New Alzheimer's Research Could Lead To Treatments

Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of resident Catherine Peake, in Washington, Feb. 6, 2012. (Charles Dharapak/AP)

A new report in the journal Nature shows a significant step forward in figuring out what causes things to go wrong in the brain early on in Alzheimer’s disease.

The research could lead to new treatments.

More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is projected to triple by 2050. So there’s urgent demand for treatments — or even better, a cure — but so far, there has been little progress on that front.

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

An Argument Against Standing Desks

(Pace McCulloch)

One office worker says he enjoys sitting and he’s tired of the “superior moral attitude” from the standers around him.

Writer Ben Crair told Here & Now he accepts the medical studies showing that sitting at your desk is bad for your health. His objection to standing is based on “the pure satisfaction I get from sitting,” he said.

He argues there are other solutions to the health problem of sitting too long.

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The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

In Closing Arguments, Prosecutors Portray Manning As Reckless

Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning attach banners to the perimeter fence of Fort Meade in Maryland, where Manning is facing a military trial.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:41 pm

Pfc. Bradley Manning acted recklessly when he released a massive cache of classified information, prosecutors said during closing arguments at his military trial in Fort Meade in Maryland today.

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It's All Politics
3:12 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Pelosi Says Weiner Should 'Get A Clue'; Popularity Dives In NYC

Huma Abedin (right) glances at her husband, New York City mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner, as he speaks at a press conference Tuesday.
Kathy Willens AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:48 pm

(Updated 6:50 p.m. EDT)

Democrat Anthony Weiner's path to the New York City mayor's office got a lot more complicated Thursday, just two days after he asserted that new revelations of his lewd online conduct would not chase him from the race for his party's nomination.

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

William And Kate Took 2 Days. How Long Can You Wait To Name A Baby?

Stumped on what to call the baby? Some places give you more time to decide than others.
EHStock iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:40 pm

With their announcement of His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge wasted little time putting to rest speculation about the name of the U.K.'s newest royal. (And that speculation was rife — bookies in the United Kingdom had been doing brisk business on baby name wagers for weeks.)

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Remembering Faye Hunter Of 'Let's Active'

Faye Hunter, the founding bassist of Let's Active. (Facebook)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:55 pm

Everybody knows R.E.M. but there were so many other southern bands that played the sort of jangly guitar pop that the boys from Athens, Georgia, made famous.

One of my favorites was Let’s Active, formed by Mitch Easter, Sara Romweber and Faye Hunter in 1981.

Any band that can produce a song like “Every Dog Has His Day” is OK in my book.

Well, Faye Hunter, who played bass and sang in Let’s Active, died on July 21, apparently a suicide.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Story Update: A Victory In Fight To Overhaul Penn Station

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:55 pm

There’s an update on a story Here & Now brought you in May, about the fate of New York City’s Pennsylvania Station.

On Wednesday, the New York City Council voted to limit Madison Square Garden’s permit to 10 years. Right now, the Garden sits on top of Penn Station.

With this decision, the stadium will have to find another spot. That’s great news to a couple of activists who said Penn Station was in need of a serious overhaul.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Award-Winning Novel On Asian American Artists

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:55 pm

In “The Collective,” writer Don Lee tells the story of three Asian Americans who meet at college and eventually form an artists’ collective in Cambridge, Mass.

The novel is a meditation on friendship and what it means to be Asian and an artist in the United States.

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Parallels
2:00 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

For American Defectors To Russia, An Unhappy History

Lee Harvey Oswald, the assassin of President Kennedy in 1963, had defected to the Soviet Union several years earlier, but returned to the U.S. after becoming disillusioned with that country. He is shown here in a Dallas police station after his arrest for Kennedy's shooting.
AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:52 pm

If NSA leaker Edward Snowden is allowed to leave the Moscow airport and enter Russia, as some news reports suggest, he'll join a fairly small group of Americans who have sought refuge there.

So how did it work out for the others?

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