Environment
5:23 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

The Algae Is Coming, But Its Impact Is Felt Far From Water

Chinese beachgoers walk by an algae-covered public beach in Qingdao, China, in July. The seas off China have been hit by their largest-ever growth of algae, ocean officials say, with waves of green growth washing onto the shores.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:49 pm

Algae blooms are green or red or brown, slimy, smelly and you don't want it coming soon to a waterfront near you.

Most of us don't give a lot of thought to algae until the furry-like monstrosity is spreading over beaches, rivers, lakes and bays, but gigantic algae blooms have become an increasing problem around the world.

The danger algae blooms pose is that they sap the body of water where they are growing of nutrients and oxygen; they then die, decompose and rot.

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Music
5:03 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Trumpeters And Troubadours: New And Old Music From Italy

The band Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino is leading the revival of an old Italian folk style called taranta, which has hypnotic rhythms meant to have restorative powers.
Daniela Cardone Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:53 pm

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Gabriel Spitzer covers health and science at KPLU, after a year covering youth and education. He joined KPLU after years covering science, health and the environment at WBEZ in Chicago. There, he created the award-winning mini-show, Clever Apes. Having also lived in Alaska and California, Gabriel feels he’s been closing in on Seattle for some time, and has finally landed on the bullseye.

Code Switch
3:56 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Amusement Parks And Jim Crow: MLK's Son Remembers

Martin Luther King Jr sits on a swing with his eldest daughter, Yolanda, and eldest son, Martin, at an amusement park he helped desegregate.
Courtesy of the King family

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

In this three-part series, Karen Grigsby Bates talks with children of Medgar Evers, Viola Liuzzo and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to see how they've coped with the burden and privilege of their legacies.

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Author Interviews
3:39 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

'Dressing Constitutionally': When Fashion And Laws Collide

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 10:19 am

How short is too short, according to the law? Wardrobe choices, or lack thereof, raise all sorts of issues — from First Amendment concerns to questions of equality, sexuality and control.

Ruthann Robson's new book, Dressing Constitutionally Hierarchy, Sexuality, and Democracy from Our Hairstyles to Our Shoes, examines anecdotes throughout history demonstrating the ways fashion and laws can conflict or influence one another. Robinson talks with Jacki Lyden, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about some of those examples.

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Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

How A Massive Power Outage Sent People Out In The Street

The New York City skyline is mostly dark in this photo of the 2003 blackout that hit U.S. and Canadian cities.
Frank Franklin II AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:38 pm

On Aug. 14, 2003, a series of cascading power failures led to a blackout that spread across the Northeast and as far west as Ohio. Some 50 million people were affected, and the power outages lasted up to 31 hours.

New York City was especially hard hit as the skyline went dark, and its 8 million residents coped without traffic lights or subways. We'll be exploring the lessons learned in the week ahead, but reporter Beth Fertig of member station WNYC reminds us what happened in her city.

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Books
12:38 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

'Books On Bikes' Helps Seattle Librarians Pedal To The Masses

Farmers market visitors browse the offerings of Seattle Public Library's "Books on Bikes" program.
Gabriel Spitzer for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

By the loading dock of Seattle's downtown library, librarian Jared Mills checks his tire pressure, secures his iPads and locks down about 100 books to an aluminum trailer the size of a steamer trunk. The scene is reminiscent of something you'd see in an action movie, when the hero is gearing up for a big fight, but Mills is gearing up for something very different.

"If you're not prepared and don't have a lot of experience hauling a trailer, it can be kind of dangerous," Mills says, especially when you're going downhill. "The trailer can hold up to 500 pounds."

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Reactor Powered Up On First 'Made in India' Nuclear Sub

A Russian Akula-class sub in Brest harbor, western France, in 2004. The INS Arihant is said to be based on this Cold War design.
Fred Tanneau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 12:44 pm

India has activated the reactor aboard the INS Arihant, believed to be the first nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine designed and built outside the Cold War "nuclear club."

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh called the event a "giant stride in ... our indigenous technological capabilities."

It's the first nuclear-powered submarine built in India and the first such vessel constructed by a country other than the United States, U.K., France, Russia or China.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Family Rescued In Pacific After Sailing 'Where God Led Us'

The Gastonguays hoped to reach the vast archipelago nation of Kiribati, part of which is shown in this 2001 photo.
Torsten Blackwood AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:59 pm

A leap of faith that sent an Arizona family bound for the South Pacific in a sailboat has returned them in an airplane after a harrowing ordeal at sea that saw them adrift and nearly out of food in one of the remotest stretches of ocean on the planet.

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The Two-Way
9:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Israel OKs New Settlement Construction In West Bank

Chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erakat speaks to the media with Israel's chief negotiator and Justice Minister Tzipi Livni (left) and Secretary of State John Kerry in Washington on July 30.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:20 am

Israel's housing minister has given the green light to build 1,200 apartments in Jewish settlements in the West Bank, complicating newly revived peace talks with the Palestinians.

The decision comes as the two sides prepare for a second round of talks in Jerusalem after a high-level meeting in Washington, D.C., on July 31 — the first in five years.

The Associated Press writes:

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