The Picture Show
5:46 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

New And Returning Faces Reflect On The March On Washington

Gerald Bundy of Philadelphia was 13 when his older cousin convinced him to go to the March on Washington in 1963. Bundy returned 50 years later to celebrate the anniversary. When he looks back on it now he believes the experience, "made me more cognizant of social justice; made me an activist."
Chloe Coleman NPR

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:23 pm

Tens of thousands of people congregated in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom — one of the largest civil rights rallies in American history, and the day that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his indelible "I Have A Dream" speech.

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Author Interviews
5:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

'The Blessing Cup': Polacco And Her Family Of Storytellers

Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Patricia Polacco has written and illustrated more than 90 picture books. Her young readers are drawn to her stories about family and growing up. She has won many awards for her illustrations, which are done in gorgeous, full watercolor. Polacco's latest book is called The Blessing Cup.

Polacco tells NPR's Jacki Lyden that early life had a profound effect on her work. Many of her books feature her grandmother, called "Babushka" in Yiddish, and take place on her grandmother's farm in Michigan.

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Race
5:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

50 Years Later, A March On Washington Among Generations

Demonstrators on Saturday in Washington, D.C., commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 3:55 pm

They came by the beat of drums: grandparents with their grandchildren, community organizers and activists, church members and college students.

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Law
5:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

In Tennessee Jail, It May Soon Be Pay To Stay

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

If you do the crime, you do the time. But if you're doing time at Anderson County Jail in Clinton, Tennessee, it may get a bit more expensive. This week, lawmakers in the county passed a resolution that would charge inmates for basic necessities: nine bucks for pants, $6.26 for a blanket, 29 cents for a roll of toilet paper.

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Remembrances
5:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Remembering Ethicist Jean Bethke Elshtain, Who Backed 'Justifiable War'

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Writer and ethicist Jean Bethke Elshtain died this month in Nashville, Tenn. She was 72. As a very specific kind of political theorist, Elshtain was known as a realist, unafraid to talk about God. It made her a unique and influential public intellectual of her time. Rather unusually, she held a joint appointment at the University of Chicago in both the divinity school and the political science department. William Schweiker was Elshtain's colleague at the U of C, and her friend; and he offered this remembrance.

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Animals
5:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

It's Pandamonium Once Again In Washington, D.C.

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

We have a cub. The National Zoo made that announcement in all caps on Twitter at 5:32 p.m. last night. The zoo's giant panda, Mei Xiang, gave birth to her third cub Friday. Now there's a state of, wait for it, pandamonium here in Washington. Thousands of eyes were glued to the zoo's panda cam as the tiny creature came into the world.

(SOUNDBITE OF BABY PANDA)

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Law
5:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

N.Y. County Outsources The Job Of Monitoring Sex Offenders

Troy Wallace with his wife, Lynda. Wallace is suing Suffolk County, N.Y., contending its new sex offender monitoring law violates his civil rights.
Charles Lane NPR

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

A suburban county on Long Island, N.Y., is taking a novel approach to monitoring sex offenders: It's giving the job to a victims' advocacy group.

The measure was approved unanimously earlier this year; lawmakers call it a cost-effective way to keep citizens safe. But a local lawyer calls it a "vigilante exercise," and convicted sex offenders are organizing to challenge the legislation.

'The Trackers'

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Art & Design
5:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Hacker-Artist's Mantra: 'Fun Makes The Politics Go Down'

Artwork from Roth's solo exhibition "Welcome to Detroit," on display at Eastern Michigan University in 2012.
Evan Roth

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Evan Roth knows how to get a rise out of the people and organizations he targets.

Over his career, the Michigan-born "hacker-artist" has taken on Google, the Transportation Safety Administration, and — most bravely of all — Justin Bieber's fans, Beliebers.

Some might call him a prankster, a rabble-rouser, or an enfant terrible, but Roth prefers "hacker-artist" despite the connotation that "hacker" might hold for some people.

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Parallels
2:29 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

After 'Night From Hell,' People Of Damascus Ask: Are We Safe?

Men wearing masks walk along a deserted street that was hit by what activists said was a gas attack in the Damascus suburb of Ain Tarma on Wednesday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:32 am

The writer is a Syrian citizen living in Damascus who is not being further identified out of safety concerns.

Damascenes are shedding tears for the fallen and expressing fear and confusion in the aftermath of what could prove to be one of the worst chemical attacks in recent years. Residents are left unsure of how to protect their health in the wake of the incident.

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Code Switch
1:56 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

While Unsung in '63, Women Weren't Just 'Background Singers'

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer of Ruleville, Miss., speaks to the state's Freedom Democratic Party sympathizers outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C., in 1965.
William J. Smith AP

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

On that sweltering August day in 1963, almost a quarter-million people thronged the National Mall, from the Washington Monument to the columned marble box that is the Lincoln Memorial. The crowning moment, of course, was Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech.

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