News

Emily Richardson-Lorente

This month marks the one year anniversary of Sweet Briar College’s near-shut down.  In the first part of this report, we heard from students and faculty who are just happy to be back at work on the college’s Amherst campus. Today, we return to take a closer look at how Sweet Briar is adapting to ensure its single-sex survival in a coed kind of world. WMRA's Emily Richardson-Lorente has the story.

Emily Richardson-Lorente

One year ago, Sweet Briar College shocked its students, faculty and alumnae by announcing that the 114 year old school would be closing — and quick — due to financial difficulties. But after a massive social media campaign and a successful lawsuit, the college is still kicking one year later. WMRA's Emily Richardson-Lorente visited the campus in Amherst.

On this week's Second Look, WMRA's Jessie Knadler hears from Staunton residents who braved snow on the last day of winter to help create a sort of city scrapbook.... she also attended an anti-KKK rally in Lexington... and explained the science behind marijuana's medicinal "Entourage Effect."  We also have a look at the effort of some Charlottesville officials to remove the statue of Robert E. Lee from a city park, and we'll sift through the archives for Bob Leweke's interview with Paula Poundstone.

Kai Degner, "Hello Harrisonbug"

On this episode of The Spark: Meet industrial hemp farmer Rick Trojan, who has been traveling across the country in the, “Hemp Bus,” advocating for the production of Hemp.

Life on Ceres?

Mar 25, 2016
NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/ASI/INAF

On this episode of Our Island Universe: Will we find life on Ceres?

Jessie Knadler

One component of marijuana has been gaining a lot of attention lately as a healing agent, treating everything from epilepsy to PTSD to arthritis. A law just passed in Virginia allows this component, known as cannabidiol, or CBD, oil, for the treatment of epilepsy. But medical marijuana proponents say that CBD on its own is actually not that effective as a healing agent. WMRA’s Jessie Knadler explores what really is doing the healing and why it’s so politically noxious.

Jessie Knadler

Numerous Ku Klux Klan leaflets were found on people’s lawns in a neighborhood in Lexington over the weekend of March 13th.   On Monday, March 21, Lexington residents turned out for an anti-KKK peace rally, and WMRA’s Jessie Knadler was there.

Jessie Knadler

How do you capture a town’s “It” factor at any given moment in time? Planners in Staunton came up with a clever idea. Think, Antiques Roadshow dosed with ample civic pride.  Staunton residents braved the cold and snow on the last day of winter and offered all sorts of interesting, quirky, momentous Staunton memorabilia — providing a sort of “scrapbook of the community.” WMRA’s Jessie Knadler was there.

On this week's edition of Second Look, WMRA's Emily Richardson-Lorente takes us to one classroom in Albemarle County where students are enjoying a unique educational version of the popular videogame Minecraft.... In Virginia news, we look at two studies -- one looking at how pipelines might affect property values, and another at trends on college campuses.... and, we meet two photographers documenting a very diverse part of Virginia.  Plus, Our Island Universe and The Spark!

On this episode of The Spark: Harrisonburg's Claudia McClain picked up her knitting years ago when she put down alcohol. And not being able to find the right yarns, she decided to design and manufacture her own. Voila! Claudia's Hand painted Yarn. When she's knitting, Claudia says that four words repeat like a mantra in her mind as she knits:  peace, love, comfort, joy.

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