News

On this week's Second Look, WMRA's Jordy Yager has the details of a proposed mental health docket in Charlottesville.  Marguerite Gallorini will take us on a tour of a small, private school creating an alternative for disabled students, a group with higher suspension rates in the public schools.  Jessie Knadler has the latest in the struggle by Valley poultry workers to organize, and we’ve even got a couple stories of different people, from different places, and different cultures, coming together through music.

Hello Out There...

Oct 19, 2017

On this episode of Our Island Universe: If there is a high probability of life in the universe, why haven't we ever been contacted by another form of life?

Marguerite Gallorini

Children with disabilities are some of the most frequently suspended students in public schools, according to a recent report. What does that mean for the future of special education? More and more attention is given to alternative education programs. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini visits a special kind of school in Charlottesville.

Marguerite Gallorini

The University of Virginia and its Commission on Slavery teamed up with the Slave Dwelling Project to organize a symposium called “Universities, Slavery, Public Memory and the Built Landscape.” This four-day conference will end with a field trip to Montpelier, Monticello and Highland on Saturday. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini was at the opening reception Wednesday [October 18] and filed this report.

Jordy Yager

Later this year Charlottesville may add a new docket to its court system, specially geared towards people who may have mental health issues that factored into their running afoul of the law. WMRA’s Jordy Yager has this report.

Dillon Broadwell

Last week James Madison University hosted ESPN’s College GameDay before the Dukes' home football game against Villanova. WMRA's Dillon Broadwell was there for the fun.

David Kreider

In their ongoing effort to unionize, aggrieved poultry workers in Rockingham County rallied again this month, this time outside the Cargill plant in Dayton. They claim the company willfully violates its own Code of Conduct, as WMRA’s Jessie Knadler reports.

On this week's Second Look... Is the growth of craft brewing sustainable, even with the extra boost from the state?  WMRA’s Jessie Knadler has that story....  Christopher Clymer Kurtz introduces us to two JMU students who, except for a piece of paper, are Americans.  But with Trump’s end of DACA, they’re now in limbo, again....  Christopher also surveys a slice of land in Harrisonburg getting a new lease, so to speak, and some much needed healing....

Hitchhiking by Asteroid

Oct 12, 2017
Wikipedia Commons

On this episode of Our Island Universe: What do we know about the origins of life on Earth?

Jessie Knadler

Governor McAuliffe has doubled down on Virginia’s craft brew industry, but some in the business wonder if that sector’s explosive growth has come at the expense of local players -- and if it's sustainable. WMRA’s Jessie Knadler reports on the craft brew enterprise in Virginia.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

Unused land within city limits has potential, and some community organizers have begun turning one such area in Harrisonburg into a place of social and ecological restoration. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

Hello Sun... Say "Ahhhhhhh"

Oct 5, 2017
Wikipedia Commons

On this episode of Our Island Universe: NASA is preparing to launch a solar probe designed to learn more about the temperature zones of our sun.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

In accordance with President Trump’s ending of President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, Thursday, October 5, 2017, is the last day that some eligible DREAMers, also called “DACAmented” residents, can apply for renewal of their DACA status. While Congress is working out what to do, many of these young people are anxious about their options. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz spoke with two students at James Madison University, and filed this report.

Paula Poundstone, comedian and Wait, Wait... Don't Tell Me panelist, will return to the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville, Friday, October 6th. Paula relies on audience participation for her performances, and says no two of her shows are ever the same. But her material also includes riffing on her life with three kids, and a houseful of pets. WMRA's Bob Leweke took the opportunity to  talk with Paula Poundstone about what's new in her life.

NASA / JPL

On this episode of Our Island Universe: Taking steps to protect alien life as we explore the galaxy.

Courtesy Lock & Talk Virginia

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month - which will be recognized at Piedmont Virginia Community College through an event organized by the Lock & Talk Virginia campaign, brought by the Health Planning Region One Suicide Prevention Committee. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini talked with its program coordinator Rebecca Textor.

Arnold Popkin

Many of us celebrate a birthday with a meal out at a favorite restaurant, or a party with cake and presents.  But retired Charlottesville ophthalmologist Arnold Popkin will celebrate his birthday by playing a concert at Charlottesville’s First Presbyterian Church on Sunday afternoon.  WMRA’s Kimberlea Daggy has more.

Jordy Yager

Less than 7 weeks since white supremacists marched with torches on the University of Virginia campus across the street, St. Paul’s Memorial church hosted a panel discussion on Wednesday evening aimed at addressing white supremacy and Christianity. WMRA’s Jordy Yager has more.

Marguerite Gallorini

What is the best practice to address the epidemics related to opioid use in Virginia – and in the nation? Last month, WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini reported on alternatives to prescribing opiates.  This week, a group of Canadian health care professionals are in Charlottesville as part of a two-day conference on the subject organized by the Center for Global Health at UVa. Marguerite has more.

Al Bartholet, Executive Director and General Manager for WMRA and WEMC, is retiring after working in radio for nearly 40 years. Bartholet came to WMRA in 2013 after a 32 year career with WKSU in Kent, Ohio. Bartholet leaves WMRA with a legacy of increased local news, new fundraising strategies and expanded community engagement. 

Marguerite Gallorini

Frank Dukes, a fellow at the Institute for Environmental Negotiation at UVa, is one of two presenters at an event today at JMU called "Why Confederate Monuments Matter: Charlottesville and Beyond."  WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini has this report.

Peggy Brubaker

This Saturday [Sept. 30], the 20th International Festival in Harrisonburg will again include Aztec dancing as part of the celebration of the city’s cultural and language diversity. The dancers are led by a Harrisonburg couple who are working to keep alive the Aztec traditions in their Mexican roots, as WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

On this week's Second Look, we profile Charlottesville's Eboni Bugg, as the next installment of our Women of Interest series, and we hear from other African Americans in Charlottesville who find conversations of race and inequality more urgent than ever.

Tomtoberfest is here! Today and tomorrow, the Tom Tom Fall festival is celebrating creative community and local innovation with, among other things, two free days of concert at Emancipation Park in Charlottesville. WMRA's Marguerite Gallorini talked with founder Tom Beyer about how the fall’s events differ from the big festival in the Spring.

Jordy Yager

For the latest installment of our Women of Interest series, WMRA’s Jordy Yager met a woman who is dedicated to breaking down not just barriers to mental wellness, but also barriers for African Americans in Charlottesville.

The Cassini Sacrifice

Sep 21, 2017
NASA / JPL

On this episode of Our Island Universe: Why did we crash Cassini into Saturn at the end of it's mission?

Marguerite Gallorini

One month ago three people died in Charlottesville in a violent day of white supremacist hatred and violent clashes with counter-protesters.  But how does the community heal after such a trauma? Several groups are providing free counseling and wellness services to the residents of Charlottesville who have been affected in one way or another by the violence of that weekend. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has more.

Faith E. Pinho

The church where Confederate General Robert E. Lee attended during his time in Lexington will no longer bear his name, as of a vote Monday night by the vestry of R. E. Lee Memorial Episcopal Church -- or, Grace Episcopal Church, as it is now called. WMRA's Faith Pinho has the story.

Jordy Yager

It’s been one month since a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville left three people dead and dozens more injured. The city has since attempted to piece itself back together, realizing that deeper issues are also at play. For a look towards the future, WMRA’s Jordy Yager spoke with educators and teens about their reality.

Dillon Broadwell

Last Saturday, Dynamic Aviation hosted a 50th anniversary party open to the public at their company headquarters near Bridgewater.  WMRA’s Dillon Broadwell was there to get a glimpse of the little airfield, and what Dynamic Aviation does.

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